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FOUR OF THE BIGGEST THINGS NUCLEOAPES AND THEIR APOLOGISTS CONSTANTLY LIE ABOUT

Ken Raskin, FOUR OF THE BIGGEST THINGS NUCLEOAPES AND THEIR APOLOGISTS CONSTANTLY LIE ABOUT ARE

1. THE ACTUAL MORTALITY AND MORBIDITY OF RADIONUCLDES AND THEIR EFFECTS

2. THE HIGH TOXIICITY AND RADIOTOXICITY OF TRITIUM

3. THE BIG LIE OF HORMESIS

4. THAT RADIOACTIVE WASTE CAN BE SAFELY STORED  –  WE ARE ALL LIVING ON THE BEACH NOW! (see  https://nuclear-news.net/2018/09/14/no-way-to-store-nuclear-waste-safely-we-are-living-on-the-beach-in-the-usa-in-japan-it-is-much-worse/)

 

In this post, Ken Raskin covers 1. THE ACTUAL MORTALITY AND MORBIDITY OF RADIONUCLDES AND THEIR EFFECTS

Radionuclides In Industry In Pharmaceuticals  (the other items will be published in later posts.)

I have seen first hand, THE RESULTS OF RADIOPHARMACEUTICAL OVEREXPOSURES AND industrial ACCIDENTS with things like cesium 137.
I am constantly amazed, at how willingly, experts are so quick to lowball morbidity and mortality calculations and effects, in the face of Chernobyl and Fukushima. There is no such thing as low-level radioactive waste. Any ingested radionuclide, does its damage and then some. Even in microscopic amounts!

The dose of I131, used for thyroid ablation is about 30 billionths of a gram. It is not necessary to do any radiation modeling for that. I131 is used as a pharmaceutical drug, to destroy thyroid tissue in place of surgery. There is little need for complicated individual dose calculations. There is certainly, no need for any bs radiation modeling. If a bolus of radiopharmaceutical I131 is administered via oral solution, it will find its way to the thyroid to do its dirty deed.

I131 is also a fission product . An acute dose of I131 in the environment, rarely reaches the saturation level of a radiopharmaceutical administered, in a hospital for a thyroidectomy. Global thyroid damage will be observed, for those who are unlucky enough to absorb higher boluses of I131, in an exposure. Thyroid cancer may occur. I saw a case of Iridium Exposure, where a man died in an industrial accident. How many of us have seen bad results of gamma knife therapy or readiopharmaceutical therapy. A lot. Then the rotten frikin nucleoapes have the gall to stand around ans say there were minimal casualties from chernobyl or fukushima.

There is the fella I knew,  who worked a brief time in an Uranium complex. Fifteen of his coworkers died before age 50, of cancer. The chickenshits will turn around and tell you, THAT only one worker has died, from radionuclide related causes at fukushima. They will say the Mclatchy study that showed 33,000 or so, nuclear workers died over 2 years, is wrong. They will say it because they are liars, propagandists, professional shills, or unrepentant-ignorant fools.

Similar to Iodine131 in it’s incredible toxicity, is Cesium 137 . It is a gamma and beta emmiter. CESIUM 137 Is acutely toxic to heart tissue, at 100 billionths of a gram. Remember chernobyl heart.  No radiation modelling is necessary to establish this fact. The observation of heart effects from cesium 137/134 exposure to cesium 137,  effects on the heart  quite discernable. From the many studies from chernobyl and belarussian victims of chernobyl, observed by Bandhechevsky, Yablokov, and Miller.

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September 17, 2018 Posted by | 2 WORLD, radiation | 1 Comment

Campaign against “interim” (stranded) waste dump – USA

The country doesn’t need “parking lot dumps for interim storage,”

“We as communities want it out of here. We want it to be in safe place where its never moved again. We think it’s lunacy to move it twice.”

Waste Control Specialists has been lobbying federal officials to establish an interim high-level waste repository

Anti-nuclear groups urge action against national waste dump  https://www.recorder.com/CAN-plans-nuclear-waste-speaking-tour-20148074   
Staff Writer, September 15, 2018

With closure and dismantling of the Yankee Atomic plant in Rowe and now Vermont Yankee and other New England nuclear sites pretty much a fait accompli, watchdog groups like Citizens Awareness Network are focused on the one tremendous remaining issue: the high-level nuclear waste remaining on the reactor sites.

CAN is planning a tour with a giant can — a 32-foot-long wooden mock-up of a radioactive waste cask — and an array of speakers to speak about what the organization calls “the abdication by the federal government and the nuclear industry” to deal with high-level nuclear waste “stranded” at nuclear sites around. Continue reading

September 17, 2018 Posted by | USA, wastes | Leave a comment

Typhoon Mangkhut heads towards two nuclear power stations on China’s Guangdong coast

Typhoon Mangkhut: Two nuclear power plants on China’s Guangdong coast in path of storm  Workers batten down the hatches at Yangjiang and Taishan facilities as superstorm set to make landfall nearby, South China Morning Post Sarah Zheng, 16 September, 2018,Two nuclear power plants stand on the projected path of Typhoon Mangkhut, which is expected to make landfall in mainland China as early as Sunday afternoon. Taishan Nuclear Power Plant and Yangjiang Nuclear Power Station, both in Guangdong province, said they were “in combat readiness” mode as the superstorm approached.

The Taishan plant, which is about 135km from Hong Kong, said via WeChat that officials had discussed how best to deal with the approaching storm and specialist workers had conducted safety investigations.

Emergency response teams had also been briefed and were prepared for the typhoon’s arrival………

The Yangjiang power plant, which went into commercial operation in 2014, has been in the news before.

In 2016, four members of its staff were punished for breaching operational guidelines and covering up an incident in which a residual heat-removal pump on one of the reactors stopped functioning for six minutes.

Last year, component supplier Dalian Teikoku Canned Motor Pump Company was fined for violating operating rules regarding welding at the plant……..https://www.scmp.com/news/china/society/article/2164363/chinese-nuclear-power-plant-path-super-typhoon-mangkhut

September 17, 2018 Posted by | China, climate change | Leave a comment

List published of events that increased the risk of reactor core meltdown in French nuclear power plants.

Mediapart 14th Sept 2018 , Mediapart publishes a document that has never been made public: the list of all events increasing the risk of reactor core meltdown in French nuclear
power plants. Between 2003 and 2014, thirty-seven production units experienced more than ten. Cruas, Fessenheim, Gravelines and Tricastin are the most affected. It’s a list that has never been made public.

It was forwarded by the Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN) to German MP Sylvia Kotting-Uhl, who herself sent it to Mediapart. It brings together the so-called “precursor” events, that is to say that increase the risk of reactor core meltdown occurring in French nuclear power plants between 2003 and 2014.

https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/france/140918/nucleaire-nouvelles-questions-sur-la-surete-des-centrales

September 17, 2018 Posted by | France, safety | Leave a comment

Sticking with nuclear power will make climate change worse — Beyond Nuclear International

Nuclear is too slow and gets in the way of real solutions

via Sticking with nuclear power will make climate change worse — Beyond Nuclear International

September 17, 2018 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

What are nuclear power plants doing to address climate threats? — Beyond Nuclear International

Sea level rise could inundate coastal reactors, with catastrophic consequences

via What are nuclear power plants doing to address climate threats? — Beyond Nuclear International

September 17, 2018 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Dr Chris Busby’s False Arrest and that report of “Sellafield Radioactive Mud” —

Last Thursday Dr Chris Busby – one of the few UK scientists challenging the nuclear civil/military industry was falsely arrested and his liberty taken away for 19 hours. This is extreme. The Daily Mail reported that “Dr Busby, 73, is said to have his own laboratory at home and supposedly keeps, among […]

via Dr Chris Busby’s False Arrest and that report of “Sellafield Radioactive Mud” —

September 17, 2018 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Tepco to build finally extra sea wall to reinforce Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant

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Fukushima Daiichi to be reinforced against tsunami

September 14, 2018
The operator of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant plans to build additional seawalls along its damaged reactors.
Its aim is to keep another possible mega-tsunami from causing the leakage of highly radioactive water accumulated in the basement of buildings housing 3 reactors that suffered a meltdown following the 2011 quake and tsunami.
The Tokyo Electric Power Company, or TEPCO, announced the plan at a meeting of the Nuclear Regulation Authority on Friday.
Last December, a government earthquake research panel warned of a possible imminent mega-quake in the Chishima Trench off the northern prefecture of Hokkaido.
TEPCO says its research shows such a quake could send tsunami of more than 10 meters into the Fukushima Daiichi plant and cause highly radioactive water to gush out of its damaged reactors.
The Fukushima Daiichi plant is in the process of decommissioning after the triple meltdown.
TEPCO has been pumping water into the 3 reactors to cool down fuel that melted. About 46,000 tons of contaminated cooling water and groundwater flowing into the reactor buildings have accumulated, mainly in their basement floors.
TEPCO now plans to move up work to seal the buildings’ entrances and other openings to prevent any more tsunami-related damage.
The company will also extend the coastal seawalls further north along reactor units 1 to 4, and plans to finish the work as soon as possible.
At Friday’s meeting, an official of the Secretariat of the Nuclear Regulation Authority asked TEPCO to study whether the planned extension of seawalls will affect the decommissioning work.
TEPCO’s Chief Decommissioning Officer, Akira Ono, said another tsunami could knock out equipment and delay the decommissioning process. He said the company will quickly study how and where the seawalls should be built.
 

In shift in stance, TEPCO to build extra sea wall at Fukushima plant

September 15, 2018
Heeding a government warning, Tokyo Electric Power Co. said it will build a 600-meter-long sea wall to strengthen protection against tsunami at the already battered Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant.
TEPCO announced its change in stance on Sept. 14 at a meeting of the Nuclear Regulation Authority, the country’s nuclear watchdog.
The wall will be constructed on the east side of four reactor buildings at the plant, TEPCO said. Details, such as height, construction schedule and costs, have yet to be decided.
The utility built a temporary sea wall after the March 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami caused the triple meltdown at the Fukushima plant.
The company had said the temporary wall would provide sufficient protection of the plant from tsunami.
But TEPCO officials had second thoughts after the government’s Headquarters for Earthquake Research Promotion in December 2017 warned that the probability of an extremely powerful earthquake of magnitude 8.8 or higher striking in the Pacific Ocean off Hokkaido within 30 years was 40 percent.
The headquarters called for additional safety measures at nuclear plants, saying the strength of such a quake would be similar to the magnitude-9.0 Great East Japan Earthquake that spawned the devastating tsunami in 2011.
If another huge tsunami hits the plant, it could cause tons of radioactive water to flow out and obstruct work to decommission the nuclear reactors there.
“If another tsunami comes, the measures we have taken for the past seven years will be meaningless,” a TEPCO official said.
Work continues at the Fukushima No. 1 plant to cool the melted nuclear fuel within the heavily damaged reactor buildings. This water, coupled with the tons of daily groundwater that becomes contaminated after entering the reactor buildings, has forced the utility to store tons of radioactive water in tanks on the premises of the plant.
Those tanks and radioactive water accumulating in the reactor buildings could be swept away in a tsunami that hits the plant.
In addition, 1,573 nuclear fuel assemblies are stored in pools in the damaged reactor buildings.
If a tsunami knocks out functions to cool the fuel assemblies, the fuel could melt and release radioactive substances into the atmosphere.
TEPCO constructed the temporary 400-meter-long sea wall on the south side of the No. 4 reactor building in June 2011.
For possible tsunami coming from the east or north sides, TEPCO said waterproof doors on reactor buildings could overcome the problem.
The utility decided that an additional sea wall would be needed after the headquarters’ warning about an earthquake off Hokkaido, which is located north of the Fukushima plant.
TEPCO had considered constructing a sea wall at the site even before the 2011 nuclear disaster. However, it failed to reach a decision on its construction.

September 17, 2018 Posted by | Fukushima 2018 | , | 1 Comment

Fukushima prof., residents seek to establish an archive of nuke disaster lessons

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In this July 17, 2018 file photo, tanks containing water contaminated with radioactive materials are seen on the grounds of the Fukushima No. 1 Nuclear Power Plant in Okuma, Fukushima Prefecture.
 
September 12, 2018
KATSURAO, Fukushima — A Fukushima University professor and his team are gathering materials for an archive project to pass on the lessons learned from the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and nuclear disaster in this prefecture in northeastern Japan.
In a March 2017 plan finalized by the Fukushima Prefectural Government, the archives will be inaugurated in the summer of 2020 at a cost of approximately 5.5 billion yen in the town of Futaba, which has been rendered “difficult to live” due to radioactive fallout from the triple core meltdowns at Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO)’s Fukushima No.1 Nuclear Power Plant in March 2011. The facility will have a total floor space of 5,200 square meters with areas for exhibitions, management and research, storage, training sessions and holding meetings. The design was modeled after a similar center in the western Japan city of Kobe that was built to store records of the 1995 Great Hanshin Earthquake, but with more focus on the nuclear disaster than the quake itself.
Professor Kenji Yaginuma of Fukushima University’s Fukushima Future Center for Regional Revitalization and his team are visiting places affected by the nuclear accident and collecting testimonies of residents, documents, pictures and images for the project.
Yaginuma recently interviewed Tetsuyama Matsumoto, 61, who used to be a cattle breeder in the village of Katsurao, to hear his story about how his cows had to be slaughtered after the nuclear accident.
“I can’t believe they killed the cows without running any tests first,” Matsumoto fumed about the action taken after the central government decided that all cattle inside the no-go zone, within a 20-kilometer radius of the crippled plant, had to be culled. All eight cattle Matsumoto was keeping had to be killed because his farm was inside the zone. “The cattle were supporting me and my family,” Mastsumoto said as he looked over pictures of what happened after the disaster.
Yaginuma listened to Matsumoto’s tale intently, using a video camera to record the interview. “The value of relevant documents goes up with testimonies,” explained the professor.
On the same day, he also visited the village’s board of education as well as the former municipal Katsurao Junior High School to confirm the existence of whiteboards with plans for March 2011 written on it as well as what was written on the blackboards at the school. The school held a graduation ceremony on March 11 that year, the day of the quake disaster. According to the professor, sometimes it takes months for some residents to build up enough confidence to give him some important papers they have.
Yaginuma’s team is collecting just about anything that shows the daily lives of residents before the quake, or items that show what happened in the disaster and the ensuing nuclear accident, as well as materials indicative of post-disaster situations.
In November 2017, Yaginuma and his team visited the prefectural Ono Hospital in the town of Okuma, which is just 4 kilometers away from the nuclear plant and is still included in the “difficult-to-return” evacuation area designated by the government.
On the day of the earthquake seven and a half years ago, the hospital accepted many people injured by the jolt and the subsequent tsunami. But all patients and medical staff needed to evacuate at 7 a.m. the next morning using buses and ambulances after an evacuation order due to the nuclear accident was issued. Near the clinic’s entrance, papers with patients’ names and conditions are posted on a whiteboard. Stands to hang intravenous drip bags are also scattered around, reminiscent of the tense atmosphere of the time.
“We want to make it possible for people to look back on and study the earthquake and nuclear accident from every angle based on these documents,” said Yaginuma.
(Japanese original by Takuya Yoshida, Mito Bureau)

September 17, 2018 Posted by | Fukushima 2018 | , , | Leave a comment

Japan tries to dilute tritium danger

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September 11, 2018
TEPCO could dump radioactive water into ocean any day. Help stop it!
From various correspondents
More than one million tonnes of radioactively contaminated water has already accumulated at the destroyed Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant site, stored in steel tanks and increasing in volume daily — by some accounts one new tank is added every four days. Space to store it is rapidly running out. So far, the only “plan” TEPCO has come up with to deal with the problem is to dump the water into the Pacific Ocean.
The water is accumulating in part because about 150 tonnes of groundwater seeps daily through cracks in the stricken reactors’ foundations, thereby becoming contaminated with radioactive isotopes. In addition, water flows down the surrounding hillsides onto the site, picks up radiation, and must be captured and stored on site.
TEPCO has so far been pumping the contaminated water through a filtering system that can only remove cesium and strontium. But the process creates a highly toxic sludge as a byproduct, which also has to be stored in sealed canisters on site.
Tritium, a radioactive isotope of hydrogen, cannot of course be removed from water. Hence the plan to dump the radioactive (tritiated) water into the ocean. This move has long been strongly opposed by people from many spectra in Japan. A “Resolution Against the Ocean Dumping of Radioactive Tritium-contaminated Waste Water From the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant,” initiated by physics Professor Emeritus at Kyoto University, Kosaku Yamada, has already garnered signatures from 280 individuals and 35 organizations. The Resolution is reproduced below.
The goal of the resolution is to raise public awareness about the prolonged serious health effects of the Fukushima nuclear disaster that the Japanese government is taking every step to conceal.
Now, the organizers are calling on the international community to sign on as well. You can do so by sending your contact details directly to Professor Yamada at:
kosakuyamada@yahoo.co.jp
A Resolution Against the Ocean Dumping of Radioactive Tritium-contaminated Waste Water From the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant
It was announced in March, 2014, that in the defunct Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant there was a total of approximately 3,400 trillion becquerels of tritium, with 830 trillion becquerels stored in tanks. This enormous amount of radioactive waste water has still continued to increase since then. In these circumstances, the Japanese government and Tokyo Electric Power Company Ltd. (TEPCO), in their efforts to find an easy way to dispose of the tritium-contaminated waste water created by the Fukushima nuclear disaster, have been trying to dilute and dump it into the ocean. They have been watching for an unguarded moment among the opposition movements including the fishery cooperatives who are strongly against the dumping. Now they are about to finally decide to implement the ocean dumping plan. Far from regulating such activities, Toyoshi Fuketa, the chairman of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority, has been championing this plan.
We are determined that the Japanese government and TEPCO shall never dump the radioactive waste water into the ocean for the following reasons:
1. Generally misunderstood as posing little risk to life and health, tritium is an extremely hazardous radioactive material. This is because organisms are not able to chemically distinguish tritium water from the normal water which composes most of the human body. This means that tritium can invade any part of the human body, irradiating it from inside; therefore, tritium can damage cell membranes and mitochondria in cells, indirectly through reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other radicals generated in irradiation. Tritium decay can directly cut chemical bonds of genomes or DNA strands. The risk peculiar to tritium is that if some hydrogen atoms which make up the genomes are replaced with tritium, the beta decay of the tritium into helium will cut off the chemical bonds of the genome.
Plants produce starch from water and carbon dioxide gas by using photosynthesis. Some of the hydrogen atoms in this starch can be replaced with tritium, forming organic tritium, which animals, plants and human beings absorb into their bodies over the long term, causing internal radiation.
2. With reference to the tritium released by various nuclear facilities, reports indicate a number of findings including: an increased incidence of leukemia among those living around the Genkai Nuclear Power Plant; an increased incidence of infant leukemia around nuclear reprocessing plants all over the world; and an increased incidence of child cancers around nuclear power plants. Real damage has already occurred.
3. Tritium, even if diluted and dumped into the ocean, will become concentrated again through aspects of the ecosystem such as food chains. Furthermore, tritium will vaporize into tritium-containing moisture or hydrogen gas, only to return to the land and eventually circulate within the environment. The idea that dilution ensures safety has caused fatal blunders to be repeated in many environmental pollution cases in the past, the vital factor being the total quantity released into the environment.  Therefore, as far as environmental pollution problems are concerned, the only righteous and principled policy is to thoroughly confine and isolate radioactive materials or toxic substances from the ecosystem.
As tritium has a long half-life of 12 years, it destroys the environment over the long term.  Tritium is an isotope of hydrogen which constitutes not only most of the living body but also its genes, so tritium disposal via dilution cannot be safe. Thus, we strongly urge the Japanese government and the Nuclear Regulatory Authority never to dump tritium into the ocean.

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September 17, 2018 Posted by | Fukushima 2018 | , , , | Leave a comment

Nearly 60,000 evacuees, 5,623 in temporary housing 7.5 yrs after Tohoku disaster

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A tsunami triggered by the March 11, 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake is seen surging inland in Natori, Miyagi Prefecture, in the country’s northeast
 
September 11, 2018
Seven and a half years have passed since the Great East Japan Earthquake hit Japan on March 11, 2011, but nearly 60,000 people still remain in evacuation and more than 5,600 people are living in temporary housing because of the quake, devastating tsunami and the triple core meltdowns at the Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO)’s Fukushima No.1 Nuclear Power Plant.
According to the government’s Reconstruction Agency, about 58,000 people still remained in evacuation as of August, although their number declined by about 15,000 during the past six months. As many as 5,623 people were living in prefabricated houses in the northeastern Japan prefectures of Iwate, Miyagi and Fukushima, as of the end of August.
The construction of public housing for victims of the disaster is 96.5 percent complete, with 29,124 units built out of a planned 30,178 in those three prefectures as of late July. The achievement rate is 91.1 percent for Iwate and 98.4 percent for Miyagi. In Fukushima, the figure is 96.3 percent for evacuees from the nuclear accident.
Around the TEPCO nuclear power plant that spewed out a large amount of highly radioactive materials from the melted cores, 11 municipalities received evacuation orders from the central government. Although the orders were lifted in 70 percent of those areas by the spring of 2017, a total of seven cities, towns and villages still have so-called “difficult-to-return” zones with high radioactivity. Even in areas where evacuation orders have been lifted, the ratio of actual to registered residents is about 20 percent.
The central government intends to phase out temporary housing in Iwate and Miyagi by fiscal 2020 when its designated reconstruction and revitalization period will end, but the timing will be delayed to fiscal 2021 or later in Fukushima. The preparation of land plots where people affected by the disaster can build their own houses is 90.6 percent complete in the three prefectures.
 
Okawa Elementary School, which was flooded by the tsunami caused by the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake, is seen in this Oct. 15, 2016 file photo taken from a Mainichi Shimbun helicopter.
 
As of Sept. 10, the number of those killed by the 2011 disaster stood at 15,896, and 2,536 people remained missing. The Reconstruction Agency says 3,676 people in 10 prefectures, including Tokyo, had died of causes related to the disaster, as of the end of March this year.
(Japanese original by Nobuyuki Hyakutake, Ishinomaki Local Bureau, and Toshiki Miyazaki, Fukushima Bureau)

September 17, 2018 Posted by | Fukushima 2018 | , , | Leave a comment

Change public view of nuclear from “acceptance” to “DEMAND” – the new spin from International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

September 17, 2018 Posted by | 2 WORLD, spinbuster | 2 Comments

Flamanville: decision to authorise the new reactor should be cancelled

Global Chance 12th Sept 2018 [Machine translation] , Comment on the draft decision of the Nuclear Safety Authority authorizing the commissioning and use of the EPR reactor vessel of the Flamanville NPP (BNI No. 167) The Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN) has put into public consultation a draft decision authorizing the commissioning of the EPR reactor vessel under construction at Flamanville.
Ten years of technical faults and concealment by operators Areva and EDF led to the finding by the ASN, made public in April 2015 that the requirement of
technical qualification was not respected for the substance and EPR tank lid and that the operators had not made the choice of the best technique for the realization of these two parts, considered in “rupture exclusion and therefore subject to strict requirements. Such a judgment should have led to the rejection of these documents and the decision to replace them.
This was not done: EDF ignored these warnings, set up these two faulty parts and loaded the tank into the reactor and obtained a derogation from the
normal procedure, through an “ad hoc” decree of the government of December 2015 authorizing a derogation in case of “particular difficulties” (these
being in this case economic and not safety). There is thus a perverse shift in the requirements of nuclear safety, confirmed by the fact that the tank
lid will have to be replaced at the latest in 2024. In these circumstances, we consider that the decision submitted for consultation is not acceptable
and must be canceled.
http://www.global-chance.org/Commentaire-sur-le-projet-de-decision-de-l-Autorite-de-surete-nucleaire-autorisant-la-mise-en-service-et-l-utilisation-de-la-cuve-du-reacteur-EPR-de-la-centrale-nucleaire-de-Flamanville-INB-No-167

September 17, 2018 Posted by | France, safety | Leave a comment

Greenpeace taking court action over Orano [formerly Areva] and transport of Australian nuclear waste to Cherbourg, France

Actu.fr 13th Sept 2018 Australian nuclear waste in Cherbourg: court hearing between Greenpeace and Orano postponed Greenpeace requested from the judge  the summary of the Cherbourg contract between ANSTO and  Orano [formerly Areva] . The case was postponed until 25 September.

Greenpeace was authorized, this Thursday, September 13, to file an interim complaint against Orano, to obtain a summary of the contract between Orano and the  Australian Agency for Nuclear Science and Technology (ANSTO).

The ship is expected this Friday. In the framework of an agreement between France and Australia signed in November 2017, the nuclear waste was loaded on board a cargo ship, BBC Austria,  – 236 spent fuel assemblies, reprocessed in four TN-MTR containers. It   left Sydney on July 29, the ship is expected Friday, September 14 in Cherbourg. Disguised storage? Greenpeace questions the legality of this contract.   It could actually be a disguised storage in France France……   https://actu.fr/normandie/cherbourg-en-cotentin_50129/dechets-nucleaires-australiens-cherbourg-laudience-entre-greenpeace-orano-reportee_18591884.html  

September 17, 2018 Posted by | France, Legal | Leave a comment

Fukuhima academic team establishing an archive of nuclear disaster lessons

Fukushima prof., residents seek to establish an archive of nuke disaster lessons, Mainichi  News,  KATSURAO, Fukushima, 16 Sept 18 — A Fukushima University professor and his team are gathering materials for an archive project to pass on the lessons learned from the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and nuclear disaster in this prefecture in northeastern Japan.

In a March 2017 plan finalized by the Fukushima Prefectural Government, the archives will be inaugurated in the summer of 2020 at a cost of approximately 5.5 billion yen in the town of Futaba, which has been rendered “difficult to live” due to radioactive fallout from the triple core meltdowns at Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO)’s Fukushima No.1 Nuclear Power Plant in March 2011. The facility will have a total floor space of 5,200 square meters with areas for exhibitions, management and research, storage, training sessions and holding meetings. The design was modeled after a similar center in the western Japan city of Kobe that was built to store records of the 1995 Great Hanshin Earthquake, but with more focus on the nuclear disaster than the quake itself.

Professor Kenji Yaginuma of Fukushima University’s Fukushima Future Center for Regional Revitalization and his team are visiting places affected by the nuclear accident and collecting testimonies of residents, documents, pictures and images for the project…………
Yaginuma’s team is collecting just about anything that shows the daily lives of residents before the quake, or items that show what happened in the disaster and the ensuing nuclear accident, as well as materials indicative of post-disaster situations………..https://mainichi.jp/english/articles/20180912/p2a/00m/0na/028000c

September 17, 2018 Posted by | culture and arts, Japan | Leave a comment