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“Radioactive Waste and Canada’s First Nations” – perilously close to ruining this Earth

Mother Earth and the “too late” time https://beyondnuclearinternational.org/2018/04/24/radioactive-waste-first_nations/ We are getting perilously close, warn First Nations, By Linda Pentz Gunter

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April 25, 2018 Posted by | Canada, wastes | Leave a comment

US President Donald Trump and French counterpart Emmanuel Macron called for a “new” deal with Iran

Trump, Macron call for ‘new’ nuclear deal with Iran  US President Donald Trump and French counterpart Emmanuel Macron called for a “new” deal with Iran Tuesday, looking beyond divisions over a landmark nuclear accord that now hangs in the balance. SBS News 25 Apr 18  Trump pilloried a three-year old agreement designed to curb Iran’s nuclear program as “insane” and “ridiculous”, despite European pleas for him not to walk away from the accord.

Instead, Trump eyed a “grand bargain” that would also limit Iran’s ballistic missile program and support for militant groups across the Middle East.

“I think we will have a great shot at doing a much bigger, maybe, deal,” said Trump, stressing that any new accord would have to be built on “solid foundations.”………

Macron, visiting Washington on a landmark state visit, admitted after meeting Trump that he did not know whether the US president would walk away from the nuclear deal when a May 12 decision deadline comes up.

“I can say that we have had very frank discussions on that, just the two of us,” Macron told a joint press conference with Trump at his side.

Putting on a brave face, he said he wished “for now to work on a new deal with Iran” of which the nuclear accord could be one part.

Trump — true to his background in reality TV — teased his looming decision.

…… Neither Trump nor Macron indicated what Iran would get in return for concessions on its ballistic programs or activities in the Middle East.Iran, meanwhile, has warned it will ramp up enrichment activities if Trump walks away from the accord, prompting Trump to issue a blunt warning.

“They’re not going to be restarting anything. If they restart it, they’re going to have big problems, bigger than they ever had before. And you can mark it down,” he said…….. https://www.sbs.com.au/news/trump-macron-call-for-new-nuclear-deal-with-iran

 

April 25, 2018 Posted by | France, Iran, politics international, USA | Leave a comment

Trump administration considers adding a special new military branch – for weapons in space

Trump considers adding a military branch – for space, News Target , 04/21/2018 / By David Williams  “……..President Trump himself has declared that creating an entirely new branch of the military, one that’s dedicated solely for matters of defense and war in space – is now in the cards.

April 25, 2018 Posted by | USA, weapons and war | Leave a comment

The slow death of net neutrality

Net Neutrality’s Slow and Insidious Death Officially Begins Today http://www.truth-out.org/news/item/44252-urgent-demands-for-congress-to-act-as-net-neutrality-s-slow-and-insidious-death-begins  April 23, 2018By Jake JohnsonCommon Dreams | Report 

Today is the day that net neutrality’s “slow and insidious” death at the hands of the Republican-controlled FCC officially begins, and Congress is facing urgent pressure to save the open internet before it’s too late.

With Monday marking 60 days after the FCC’s net neutrality repeal entered the Federal Register, parts of the GOP-crafted plan — spearheaded by agency chair and former Verizon lawyer Ajit Pai — will now slowly begin taking effect, while some still need to be approved by the Office of Management and Budget.

Net neutrality backers in Congress, meanwhile, are still struggling to compile enough votes to repeal Pai’s new rules, despite the fact that they are deeply unpopular among the American public.

The Senate needs just one more vote to pass a Congressional Review Act (CRA) resolution to restore net neutrality protections before it can move to the House, where it would face an uphill battle. An official vote in the Senate has yet to be scheduled, but could come in the next few weeks.

In a recent Twitter thread, the advocacy group Fight for the Future warned against sensationalistic headlines proclaiming that net neutrality will immediately be gone on Monday, noting that large telecom companies will ensure that the open internet’s death is as quiet and subtle as possible in order to minimize public backlash.

“The ISPs aren’t going to immediately start blocking content or rolling out paid prioritization scams. They know Congress and the public are watching them,” the group noted. “And that’s the worst part. What will happen is over time ISP scams and abuses will become more commonplace and more accepted. They’ll roll out new schemes that appear good on their face but undermine the free market of ideas by allowing ISPs to pick winners and losers.”

 

April 25, 2018 Posted by | civil liberties, USA | Leave a comment

Trump says North Korea must get rid of its nuclear weapons

 https://www.cnbc.com/2018/04/24/trump-says-north-korea-must-get-rid-of-its-nuclear-weapons.html 25 Apr 18
U.S. President Donald Trump on Tuesday said the United States would continue to put “maximum pressure” on North Korea ahead of what he hoped would be positive talks with North Korean leader Kim Jong Unthat would lead to Pyongyang’s denuclearization.

“I want them to get rid of their nukes,” Trump said at a joint news conference with French President Emmanuel Macron at the White House.

April 25, 2018 Posted by | politics international, USA | Leave a comment

Westinghouse CEO admits that the 2000s “nuclear renaissance” was never going to happen

Westinghouse CEO opens up about collapse of 2000s ‘nuclear renaissance’,  (Mainichi Japan)  WASHINGTON — The CEO of the U.S. nuclear power firm Westinghouse Electric Co. — which used to be under the Toshiba Corp. umbrella and which filed for bankruptcy in March 2017 — has told the Mainichi Shimbun that the “nuclear renaissance” in the 2000s “was not realistic.”……..

April 25, 2018 Posted by | business and costs, USA | Leave a comment

How the diabolically dangerous plutonium cores killed two nuclear scientists

The Nuclear ‘Demon Core’ That Killed Two Scientists https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/demon-core-that-killed-two-scientistsAfter World War II ended, physicists kept pushing a plutonium core to its edge. BY SARAH LASKOW 
APRIL 23, 2018 

Since the United States dropped two atomic bombs on Japan, the world has been in a state of readiness for nuclear combat. In this secretive domain, mistakes and mishaps are often hidden: This week we’re telling the stories of five nuclear accidents that burst into public view.
THE WAR WAS OVER—JAPAN HAD surrendered. The third plutonium core created by the United States, which scientists at Los Alamos National Lab had been preparing for another attack, was no longer needed as a weapon. For the moment, the lab’s nuclear scientists were allowed to keep the sphere, an alloy of plutonium and gallium that would become known as the demon core.

In a nuclear explosion, a bomb’s radioactive core goes critical: A nuclear chain reaction starts and continues with no additional intervention. When nuclear material goes supercritical, that reaction speeds up. American scientists knew enough about the radioactive materials they were working with to be able to set off these reactions in a bomb, but they wanted a better understanding of the edge where subcritical material tipped into the dangerous, intensely radioactive critical state.

 One way to push the core towards criticality involved turning the neutrons it shedback onto the core, to destabilize it further. The “Critical Assembly Group” at Los Alamos was working on a series of experiments in which they surrounded the core with materials that reflected neutrons and monitored the core’s state.

The first time someone died performing one of these experiments, Japan had yet to formally sign the terms of surrender. On the evening of August 21, 1945, the physicist Harry Daghlian was alone in the lab, building a shield of tungsten carbide bricks around the core. Ping-ponging neutrons back the core, the bricks had brought the plutonium close to the threshold of criticality, when Daghlian dropped a brick on top. Instantly, the core reacted, going supercritical and Daghlian was doused in a lethal dose of radiation. He died 25 days later.

His death did not dissuade his colleagues, though. Nine months later, they had developed another way to bring the core close to that critical edge, by lowering a dome of beryllium over the core. Louis Slotin, another physicist, had performed this move in many previous experiments: He would hold the dome with one hand, and with the other use a screwdriver to keep a small gap open, just barely limiting the flow of neutrons back to the bomb. On a May day in 1946, his hand slipped, and the gap closed. Again, the core went supercritical and dosed Slotin, along with seven other scientists in the room, with gamma radiation.

In each instance, when the core slipped over that threshold and started spewing radiation, a bright blue light flashed in the room—the result of highly energized particles hitting air molecules, which released that bolt of energy as streams of light.

The other scientists survived their radiation bath, but Slotin, closest to the core, died of radiation sickness nine days later. The experiments stopped. After a cooling-off period, the demon core was recast into a different weapon, eventually destroyed in a nuclear test.

April 25, 2018 Posted by | - plutonium, incidents, USA | Leave a comment

Will Trump take emergency measures to bail out 2 economically failing nuclear power stations?

As state help fades for 2 nuclear plants, will Trump attempt rescue? Lancaster Online, 24 Apr 18, AD CRABLE | Staff Writer

With two nuclear plants in Pennsylvania now inching closer to the point of no return, it appears there is little political will for a financial life preserver on the legislative level.

“A bailout, subsidy-type approach that we’ve seen in New York, Illinois, now New Jersey — I’ve not been satisfied that is politically viable here in Pennsylvania,” state Sen. Ryan Aument said last Tuesday.

Aument spoke after a hearing with beleaguered utility leaders called by the House-Senate Nuclear Energy Caucus that the Landisville Republican helped form to come to the aid of nuclear plants. He was not available for additional comment Monday.

……..Exelon has said that without federal or state help, its Three Mile Island nuclear plant in Dauphin County will close in September 2019, idling more than 600 workers.

FirstEnergy Corp, which recently filed for bankruptcy, recently announced that without relief it would close its Beaver Valley nuclear plant near Pittsburgh in 2021, as well as two nuclear plants in Ohio.

……. Appeals to feds

FirstEnergy Corp. has taken the drastic step of asking the U.S. Department of Energy to declare an energy emergency to ensure profits for nuclear and coal plants.

DOE has indicated it is cool to such a move.

In January, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission rejected a DOE proposal to approve rules to subsidize nuclear and coal plants to keep the nation’s power supply “reliable and resilient.”

But the Trump administration reportedly is considering a new initiative to make good on the president’s campaign pledge to protect the coal and nuclear power industries.

Bloomberg is reporting that President Trump is considering coming to the aid of struggling coal and nuclear by invoking a Cold War-era federal law that gives a president sweeping authority to nationalize the energy sector to make sure it is available in times of war or after a disaster.

The Defense Production Act was passed under the Truman administration and was used then to cap wages and impose price controls on the steel industry.

The White House Press Office did not respond to a request for comment.

At the Nuclear Caucus hearing in Harrisburg last week, representatives from Exelon, FirstEnergy and Talen Energy said that the federal government is not likely to act in time to save the nuclear plants, and they appealed for Pennsylvania legislators to act as several other states have.

“Help is not coming from Washington,” said Kathleen Barron, Exelon’s senior vice president of federal regulatory affairs and policy…….https://lancasteronline.com/news/local/as-state-help-fades-for-nuclear-plants-will-trump-attempt/article_5119d0a2-472d-11e8-a65d-0730d4760e55.html

April 25, 2018 Posted by | politics, USA | Leave a comment

In the 1950s, military accidents meant that nuclear warheads went missing.

When the U.S. Kept Losing Nuclear Bombs https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/has-america-ever-lost-nuclear-bombs  In the 1950s, military accidents meant that nuclear warheads went missing,  ,APRIL 24, 2018

April 25, 2018 Posted by | incidents, USA | Leave a comment

Design flaws in Holtec’s canisters for nuclear waste burial (-teleconference and comments)

Holtec Proposal To Bury High Level Nuclear Waste – Teleconference Sign-up Deadline Monday-Written Comments Due End Mayhttps://wordpress.com/read/feeds/4410547/posts/1834518669  22 Apr 2018
 by miningawareness   

Deadline Monday to Register for teleconference re burial of high level nuclear waste (including spent Mox fuel) in New Mexico by Holtec. Privately owned Holtec’s plan would involve cross country transport and burial of first 500 and then ultimately 10,000 high level nuclear waste cans (Chernobyls in a can). Read more here:https://adamswebsearch2.nrc.gov/webSearch2/view?AccessionNumber=ML18107A144
Written Comment deadline end of May:https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2018/03/19/2018-05438/holtec-internationals-hi-store-consolidated-interim-storage-facility-for-interim-storage-of-spent

An earlier US DOE funded site study of the site states that: “Mineral extraction in the area consists of underground potash mining and oil/gas extraction. Both industries support major facilities on the surface, although mining surface facilities are confined to a fairly small area…. Intrepid has rights to potash beneath the Site as shown in Appendix 2A, Map 9 and Figure 2.1.2-3. Mining has not progressed as far as Site….” https://www.nrc.gov/docs/ML1024/ML102440738.pdfWhile the dry salt lakes and potash mines suggest higher than normal corrosion rate for the 1/2 inch thick Holtec canisters, the location suggests sinkhole risk. The limited DOE funded study, which Holtec uses, denies the existence of karst, but this is hard to believe. Risk is exacerbated by the oil and gas wells and potash mining. The original DOE funded study states that “A producing gas and distillate well with associated tank battery is located near the communications tower…”

If “the requested CIS Facility license is issued by the NRC, Holtec subsequently anticipates requesting an amendment to the license to request authorization to possess and store an additional 500 canisters for each of 19 subsequent expansion phases to be completed over the course of years. Ultimately, Holtec anticipates that approximately 10,000 SNF canisters would be stored at the CIS Facility upon completion of all 20 phases…Phase 1 of the CIS Facility will include two HI-STORM UMAX pads that will allow storage of 500 canisters of SNF and GTCC waste from commercial nuclear reactors as well as a small quantity of spent mixed-oxide fuel..” https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2018/03/19/2018-05438/holtec-internationals-hi-store-consolidated-interim-storage-facility-for-interim-storage-of-spent

As explained by Donna Gilmore of San Onofre Safety:
“Holtec HI-STORM UMAX canister storage systems and all other thin-wall nuclear waste canister storage systems are vulnerable to short-term radioactive leaks and potential explosions and criticalities.  Each canister has roughly as much highly radioactive Cesium-137 as was released from the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear disaster.


These thin-wall “Chernobyl” cans have the following design flaws: 

* Vulnerable to short-term cracking and major radioactive leaks
* Cannot be inspected inside or out
* Cannot be repaired 

* Cannot be monitored or maintained to PREVENT radioactive leaks
* No plan for failing canisters.
Holtec proposes to transport thousands of US aging nuclear waste cans across the country to New Mexico and store them in an unproven HI-STORE CIS “Consolidated Interim Storage” facility,…
“. See Handout:  Holtec Storage System Designed to Leak.
https://sanonofresafety.files.wordpress.com/2015/10/designedtoleakholtec-cis-2017-06-24.pdf Read the rest here: https://sanonofresafety.org/holtec-hi-storm-umax-nuclear-waste-dry-storage-system/

Holtec actually admits in a recent presentation that these huge canisters which may be up to 75 ¾ inches in diameter, and up to 213 inches tall are only 1/2 inch thick and the vented protective shell only 1 inch thick: https://www.nrc.gov/public-involve/conference-symposia/dsfm/2015/dsfm-2015-stefan-anton.pdf…..

HOLTEC IS PRIVATELY OWNED, APPARENTLY BY KRIS PAL SINGH, THOUGH REALLY NO ONE KNOWS. IN THE US THIS MEANS THAT IT IS ALMOST IMPOSSIBLE TO GET INFORMATION ON THE COMPANY. IN THE PAST, SINGH HAS REFUSED TO GIVE INFORMATION ABOUT THE SPENT FUEL CASK SYSTEMS TO THE US GOVERNMENT WHEN IT WAS NEEDED BY THEM TO ESTIMATE COSTS DURING A LAWSUIT. HOLTEC HAS BEEN FINED FOR BRIBING THE TVA. HOLTEC HAS REQUESTED AND GOTTEN WHAT SEEMS LIKE ENDLESS REQUESTS FOR EXEMPTIONS TO THE AGREED STANDARDS FOR PRODUCTION AND PACKING THE SPENT FUEL CASK SYSTEMS. AN UNKNOWN NUMBER OF THE SPENT FUEL CASKS ARE NOT EVEN CORRECTLY PACKED AND RECEIVED “EXEMPTIONS”. ON AT LEAST ONE NUCLEAR REACTOR SITE ALMOST ALL ARE IMPROPERLY PACKED. NOTE THAT HOLTEC EVEN TRIES TO CLAIM COPYRIGHT ON INFORMATION WHICH HOLTEC TOOK FROM AN EARLIER US GOVERNMENT FUNDED DOCUMENT. THIS GIVES A TINY IDEA OF WHAT JERKS THEY ARE.

April 22, 2018 Posted by | USA, wastes | Leave a comment

Danger of rising sea levels to nuclear waste canisters at Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station

Special vehicles are required to move the casks, as are specially built roads that can handle the immense weight.

“We don’t know if this highly dangerous material will be there for another 100 years or a thousand years.

if the casks are not moved in the coming decades, or even centuries, they worry about who would ultimately be responsible for protecting the nuclear waste. It’s unlikely, for example, that Entergy will still own the property, they say.

Pilgrim officials consider moving nuclear waste to higher ground more https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2018/04/20/seas-rise-pilgrim-mulls-moving-its-nuclear-waste-higher-ground/rcrkilSqo4cGpfledFyrJJ/story.html? 

The problem is where to store the nuclear waste — especially since its current location won’t stay 25 feet above Plymouth Bay for long.

As sea levels rise at an accelerating rate, increasing the threat that an extreme storm surge could flood the coastal facility, Pilgrim officials are considering whether to move the spent fuel to higher ground.

Plant officials and federal regulators maintain that the current location is safe, at least for the foreseeable future, noting that the containers are designed to withstand flooding. But local activists are urging Pilgrim to take action, worried that the daunting political obstacles to moving the casks to a federal repository could force them to remain in Plymouth permanently.

“Not moving them would be irresponsible,” said Pine duBois, executive director of the Jones River Watershed Association in Kingston, which is about 8 miles from Pilgrim. “We don’t know if this highly dangerous material will be there for another 100 years or a thousand years. It has to be moved.”

Environmental advocates are calling on the state to require Entergy Corp., the Louisiana-based conglomerate that owns Pilgrim, to move the casks to its helipad or parking lot, which are three times higher than the existing storage site and set further back from the water.

Plant officials and federal regulators maintain that the current location is safe, at least for the foreseeable future, noting that the containers are designed to withstand flooding. But local activists are urging Pilgrim to take action, worried that the daunting political obstacles to moving the casks to a federal repository could force them to remain in Plymouth permanently.

“Not moving them would be irresponsible,” said Pine duBois, executive director of the Jones River Watershed Association in Kingston, which is about 8 miles from Pilgrim. “We don’t know if this highly dangerous material will be there for another 100 years or a thousand years. It has to be moved.”

Environmental advocates are calling on the state to require Entergy Corp., the Louisiana-based conglomerate that owns Pilgrim, to move the casks to its helipad or parking lot, which are three times higher than the existing storage site and set further back from the water.

Despite the concerns, plant officials say the casks are secure……….

Under recent worst-case projections, tides could rise as much as 10 feet by the end of the century and as much as 37 feet by 2200. That’s not accounting for storm surges, such as the 15-foot high tides that battered the Massachusetts coast during two nor’easters this winter, causing widespread flooding. …….

Under recent worst-case projections, tides could rise as much as 10 feet by the end of the century and as much as 37 feet by 2200. That’s not accounting for storm surges, such as the 15-foot high tides that battered the Massachusetts coast during two nor’easters this winter, causing  widespread flooding………

The decision about where to store the casks comes as the 46-year-old plant faces a host of maintenance challenges. Entergy announced three years ago that it would close Pilgrim in June 2019, after a litany of economic woes and safety issues. In 2015, the NRC designated Pilgrim as one of the nation’s three least-safe reactors.

Those problems have persisted. Until Thursday, the plant had been offline for 43 days — one of its longest unplanned outages — after crews discovered a significant issue with a transformer that provides power for Pilgrim to operate. It was the second unplanned shutdown this year.

Plant officials must also weigh a range of other issues in deciding whether to move the waste, including security, radiation, and the impact on decommissioning the plant.

Cost is another factor.

Special vehicles are required to move the casks, as are specially built roads that can handle the immense weight. For example, at Vermont Yankee, which began the decommissioning process several years ago, it cost $143 million to fill and move their remaining casks to a new storage site.

Moving the casks uphill would add to the expense, and plant officials have not ruled out building a new storage pad adjacent to the existing one, which is only about 100 feet from the reactor building.

Storing nuclear waste has long been a thorny political issue, one that has become increasingly urgent as more aging plants are shuttered………

For local activists who have long raised concerns about the dangers of nuclear power, the assurances of Pilgrim and the NRC provide little comfort.

While the casks may not leak from being submerged for a brief period, they could be subject to corrosion from exposure to saltwater, which could create cracks and eventually lead to leaks, they said.

And if the casks are not moved in the coming decades, or even centuries, they worry about who would ultimately be responsible for protecting the nuclear waste. It’s unlikely, for example, that Entergy will still own the property, they say.

“We need a plan for the next 100 to 300 years,” said Mary Lampert, director of Pilgrim Watch, a civic watchdog group. “I don’t see that happening.”

April 22, 2018 Posted by | climate change, safety, USA, wastes | Leave a comment

America’s mounting piles of plutonium cores – to be removed, perilously, by contract workers

Reuters 20th April 2018 , In a sprawling plant near Amarillo, Texas, rows of workers perform by hand
one of the most dangerous jobs in American industry. Contract workers at
the U.S. Department of Energy’s Pantex facility gingerly remove the
plutonium cores from retired nuclear warheads. Although many safety rules
are in place, a slip of the hand could mean disaster.

In Energy Department facilities around the country, there are 54 metric tons of surplus
plutonium. Pantex, the plant near Amarillo, holds so much plutonium that it
has exceeded the 20,000 cores, called “pits,” regulations allow it to
hold in its temporary storage facility. There are enough cores there to
cause thousands of megatons of nuclear explosions. More are added each day.
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-nukes-plutonium-specialreport/americas-nuclear-headache-old-plutonium-with-nowhere-to-go-idUSKBN1HR1KC

April 22, 2018 Posted by | - plutonium, employment, USA | Leave a comment

Trump to use wartime emergency Act to support coal and nuclear industries?

White House reportedly exploring wartime rule to help coal, nuclear, Ars Technica,President has used Act’s powers before for space industry. MEGAN GEUSS  

April 22, 2018 Posted by | politics, USA | Leave a comment

French President Macron urges Trump to stick with 2015 Iran nuclear accord

Iran nuclear deal: Macron urges Trump to stick with 2015 accord http://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-43858040, 23 Apr 18   French President Emmanuel Macron has urged his US counterpart, Donald Trump, to stick with the Iran nuclear deal, saying there is no better option.

He was speaking to Fox News ahead of a three-day state visit to the US starting on Monday.

Mr Trump has threatened to abandon the deal, which limits Iran’s nuclear programme in return for sanctions relief, unless it is toughened up.

He has until 12 May to decide whether to restore US sanctions against Iran.

Correspondents say such a move would effectively kill the landmark agreement between Iran and six major western powers.

The two leaders are expected to address the issue when Mr Trump hosts Mr Macron this week.

Mr Macron told Fox News he had no “plan B” for the deal if the US decided to restore sanctions, and said the US should stay in the agreement as long as there was no better option.

“Let’s present this framework because it’s better than the sort of North Korean-type situation.”

He said the two leaders had “a very special relationship” and he wanted to address ballistic missiles as part of the deal – a key demand of the US president – as well as work to contain Iran’s influence in the region.

President Trump is also demanding that signatories to the deal agree permanent restrictions on Iran’s uranium enrichment. Under the current deal they are set to expire in 2025.

He has put pressure on his European co-signatories to address these issues before the 12 May deadline, when he needs to decide whether to sign a waiver giving sanctions relief to Iran.

Under US law, passed during the Obama administration, the president needs to sign these waivers every 120-180 days acknowledging Iran’s compliance with the deal.

When Mr Trump signed the last one, in January, he said it was a “last chance” to change the accord, before the US withdraws.

Iran’s Foreign Minister Javad Zarif warned on Saturday that his country was prepared to resume its nuclear programme “at much greater speed”, if the US withdrew from the accord.

Mr Macron also appealed to the US president not to pull troops out of Syria after the final defeat of so-called Islamic State, saying that would “leave the floor” to Iran and Syria’s President Bashar al-Assad.

April 22, 2018 Posted by | France, Iran, politics international, USA | Leave a comment

Trump’s Nuclear Posture Review makes allowance for NEW NUCLEAR BOMB TESTING

War on the rocks 20th April 2018 , While the Obama administration’s Nuclear Posture Review included a
blanket commitment not to conduct explosive nuclear tests, the Trump
administration’s 2018 version of the document argues that the United
States “must remain ready to resume nuclear testing if necessary to meet
severe technological or geopolitical challenges [emphasis added].”

Severe technological challenges that could merit a return to testing do not
currently exist. Specific geopolitical challenges, a new criterion, are not
defined. Does this mean the administration could resume testing if China
continues making aggressive moves in the South China Sea? If North Korea
tests another missile? If Russian hackers disrupt U.S. government websites?
https://warontherocks.com/2018/04/mushroom-clouds-beneath-the-surface-the-dangers-of-a-return-to-nuclear-testing/

April 22, 2018 Posted by | politics, USA, weapons and war | Leave a comment