nuclear-news

The News That Matters about the Nuclear Industry Fukushima Chernobyl Mayak Three Mile Island Atomic Testing Radiation Isotope

“I couldn’t tell anyone for ten years” – Six teenagers who developed thyroid cancer after the nuclear accident file lawsuit against TEPCO 

 

“””We’re scared to be discriminated against when we say we’ve got thyroid cancer, we’ve spent the last 10 years without telling anyone.”””

“But there are approximately 300 children suffering from thyroid cancer.”

“I want to change the situation for the better by raising my voice.”

Six men and women between the ages of 17 and 27 who were living in Fukushima Prefecture at the time of the accident filed a lawsuit against TEPCO on April 27, claiming that they had thyroid cancer due to radiation exposure caused by the accident at TEPCO’s Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. On the 27th, six men and women between the ages of 17 and 27, who were living in Fukushima Prefecture at the time of the accident, filed a lawsuit with the Tokyo District Court demanding a total of 616 million yen in damages including compensation from TEPCO. The biggest point of contention in the lawsuit is expected to be whether or not there is a causal relationship between radiation exposure and thyroid cancer.

The plaintiffs’ lawyers hold a press conference after filing a lawsuit against TEPCO for compensation for thyroid cancer caused by exposure to radiation from the nuclear power plant accident at the First Legislative Assembly Hall in the House of Representatives in Nagata-cho, Tokyo.

January 27, 2022
The six, who were between the ages of 6 and 16 at the time of the accident, are high school students, part-time workers, and office workers living in Fukushima Prefecture, Tokyo, and Kanagawa Prefecture. They were diagnosed with thyroid cancer in their teens, two had one side of their thyroid gland removed, four had it completely removed due to recurrence, and one had it spread to their lungs. They have had to quit college or work due to the surgery and treatment, and are also worried about the recurrence of the disease as their daily lives are restricted.
 The complaint points out that most of the thyroid cancers found in children in Fukushima Prefecture, including the six children, are not hereditary and that no cause other than radiation exposure is possible. It argues that if there are other causes, TEPCO needs to prove them.
 Normally, the number of cases of thyroid cancer in children that are diagnosed and reported is about one to two per one million people per year. After the nuclear accident, about 300 people were diagnosed with thyroid cancer or suspected of having thyroid cancer in Fukushima Prefecture through prefectural health surveys and other means, but the prefectural expert panel has stated that a causal relationship with radiation exposure is “not recognized at this time.

A plaintiff woman holds a press conference after filing a lawsuit against TEPCO.

I want to change the situation by raising my voice.
 On the afternoon of April 27, the plaintiff, 26, held a press conference in Tokyo after filing her lawsuit. In a press conference held in Tokyo after the lawsuit was filed, the plaintiff, 26, choked back tears as she made her appeal. There are still about 300 children suffering from thyroid cancer. I want to change the situation for the better by raising my voice, even if only a little.
 A woman from Nakadori in central Fukushima Prefecture was diagnosed with thyroid cancer in 2015, when she was a 19-year-old sophomore in college. After an operation to remove one side of her thyroid gland the following year, her physical strength dropped drastically. Her physical condition continued to deteriorate, and she left the advertising agency where she had worked after graduating from university in Tokyo after a year and a half. She is now working as an office worker in Tokyo. She said, “I had to give up my dream job, and it’s still hard for me to work properly. I no longer have any dreams or hopes for the future.
 Immediately after being informed of her cancer, she felt uncomfortable when the doctor told her that it had nothing to do with the nuclear accident.

She was moving outside that day…
 When her mother heard this with her, March 14, 2011, the day of the hydrogen explosion at the Unit 3 reactor of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, came to her mind. She was outside helping her grandparents move their belongings out of their house, which was half destroyed by the disaster. When I heard about the explosion in the evening, I immediately brought the woman inside. I wish I hadn’t let her help me move at that time,” she said. I wish I hadn’t let her help me move. This was the only time she showed any regret.
 The woman traveled back and forth between Fukushima and Tokyo many times for the tests before she was notified. The prefectural government provides full support for insured medical expenses, but does not include transportation costs. I took a long-distance bus, which is cheaper than the bullet train, but it became physically demanding.

Surgeries and examinations in Tokyo, a heavy burden
 Because of her distrust of hospitals in Fukushima, she underwent surgeries and tests in Tokyo after she was notified. Her parents traveled to Tokyo each time, and the endoscopic surgery she underwent to reduce the scar on her neck as much as possible was not covered by the prefectural government at the time, so she had to pay for it herself.
 As the treatment continued, the woman forgot to apply for a non-repayable scholarship from the university, and from her third year, she had to pay the full tuition. She said, “When I heard my parents asking for advice on reconfiguring their insurance, I felt depressed that I had caused them so much trouble.

Fear of recurrence: “I’m worried about what will happen next.
 After the surgery, she caught colds frequently and developed pneumonia, bronchitis, and asthma. However, unless it is recognized as treatment for thyroid cancer, he is not eligible for support. The prefectural government’s support for medical expenses is budgeted every year with the government’s subsidies as the source, and “will continue for as long as possible,” according to the prefectural government’s Civil Health Survey Division, but there is no telling how long it will last. However, there is no way to know how long the support will last. The woman said, “I am always afraid of a recurrence, and I am very anxious about what will happen to me in the future. (Natsuko Katayama)

https://www.tokyo-np.co.jp/article/156781?fbclid=IwAR1W3fEvpnge1RiedoQw863o8vpHEYxJjkcpBAMjxjnGYQFcT31h5unzBI4

January 28, 2022 Posted by | Fuk 2022 | , , , , | Leave a comment

Can reactor fuel debris be safely removed from Fukushima Daiichi?

January 25, 2022

Source: University of Helsinki

Decommissioning and clean-up are ongoing at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP); however, many difficult problems remain unaddressed. Chief amongst these problems is the retrieval and management of fuel debris.

Decommissioning and clean-up are ongoing at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP); however, many difficult problems remain unaddressed. Chief amongst these problems is the retrieval and management of fuel debris. Fuel debris is the name given to the solidified mixture of melted nuclear fuel and other materials that now lie at the base of each of the damaged reactors (reactor Units 1 — 3). This material is highly radioactive and it has potential to generate enough neutrons to trigger successive nuclear fission reactions (uranium-235 breaks into two elements after capturing neutrons, emitting enormous amounts of energy, radiation, and more neutrons). Successive fission reactions would present a serious safety and material management risk.

One of the materials in nuclear reactors that can lower the number of neutrons interacting with uranium-235 is boron carbide (B4C). This was used as the control rod material in the FDNPP reactors, and it may now remain within the fuel debris. If so, it may limit fission events within the fuel debris.

Can the fuel debris be safely removed?

On March 11th 2011, the control rods were inserted into the FDNPP reactors to stop the fission reactions immediately after the earthquake, but the later tsunami destroyed the reactor cooling systems. Fuel temperatures soon became high enough (>2000 °C) to cause reactor meltdowns. Currently, the fuel debris material from each reactor is cooled and stable; however, careful assessment of these materials, including not only their inventories of radioactive elements but as well their boron content, a neutron absorber, is needed to ascertain if successive fission reactions and associated neutron flux could occur in the fuel debris during its removal. Many important questions remain: was boron from the control rods lost at high temperature during the meltdown? If so, does enough boron remain in the fuel debris to limit successive fission reactions within this material? These questions must be answered to support safe decommissioning.

Study shows direct evidence of volatilization of control rods during the accident.

Despite the importance of this topic, the state and stability of the FDNPP control rod material has remained unknown until now. However, work just published in the Journal of Hazardous Materials now provides vital evidence that indicates that most of the control rod boron remains in at least two of the damaged FDNPP reactors (Units 2 and/or 3).

The study was an international effort involving scientists from Japan, Finland, France, and the USA. Dr. Satoshi Utsunomiya and graduate student Kazuki Fueda of Kyushu University led the study. Using electron microscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), the team has been able to report the first-ever measurements of boron and lithium chemistry from radioactive Cs-rich microparticles (CsMPs). CsMPs formed inside FDNPP reactor units 2 and/or 3 during the meltdowns. These microscopic particles were then emitted into the environment, and the particles hold vital clues about the extent and types of meltdown processes. The team’s new results on boron-11/boron-10 isotopic ratios (~4.2) clearly indicate that most of the boron inside the CsMPs is derived from the FDNPP control rods and not from other sources (e.g., boron from the seawater that was used to cool the reactors). Dr Utsunomiya states that the presence of boron in the CsMPs “provides direct evidence of volatilization of the control rods, indicating that they were severely damaged during the meltdowns.”

Ample boron likely remains in the reactors, but more research is needed

In the study the team also combined their new data with past knowledge on CsMP emissions. From this, they have been able to estimate the total amount of boron released from the FDNPP reactors was likely very small: 0.024-62 g.

Prof. Gareth Law, a co-author from the University of Helsinki emphasized that this “is a tiny fraction of the reactor’s overall boron inventory, and this may mean that essentially all of the control rod boron remains inside the reactors.” The team hopes that this should prevent excessive fission reactions in the fuel debris. Utsunomiya stresses that “FDNPP decommissioning, and specifically fuel debris removal must be planned so that the extensive fission reactions do not occur. Our international team has successfully provided the first direct evidence of volatilization of B4C during the FDNPP meltdowns, but critically, our new data indicated that large quantities of boron, which adsorbs neutrons, likely remains within the fuel debris.”

Prof. Rod Ewing, a co-author from Stanford University acknowledged the importance of these new findings but highlighted that the team’s measurements now need to be “extended in follow-up studies, where the occurrence and distribution of boron species should be characterized across a wide range of debris fragments.”

Prof. emeritus Bernd Grambow, a study co-author from SUBATECH, Nantes, France,highlights that the work “paves the way for improving the safety assessment of debris retrieval during decommissioning at FDNPP,” with the team’s methods “providing a template for further studies.” Utsunomiya concludes that “it is nearly 11 years since the FDNPP disaster. In addition to tireless efforts from engineers at the FDNPP, scientific contributions are becoming more and more important as tools to address the major difficulties that will be faced during decommissioning.”

Journal Reference:

  1. Kazuki Fueda, Ryu Takami, Kenta Minomo, Kazuya Morooka, Kenji Horie, Mami Takehara, Shinya Yamasaki, Takumi Saito, Hiroyuki Shiotsu, Toshihiko Ohnuki, Gareth T.W. Law, Bernd Grambow, Rodney C. Ewing, Satoshi Utsunomiya. Volatilization of B4C control rods in Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactors during meltdown: B–Li isotopic signatures in cesium-rich microparticles. Journal of Hazardous Materials, 2022; 428: 128214 DOI: 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2022.128214

University of Helsinki. “Can reactor fuel debris be safely removed from Fukushima Daiichi?.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 January 2022. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/01/220125093041.htm.

January 27, 2022 Posted by | Fuk 2022 | , , , | Leave a comment

Leakage of liquid from frozen soil wall caused by misalignment of pipe joints TEPCO

January 25, 2022

Leakage of liquid from frozen soil wall caused by misalignment of pipe joints TEPCO

As part of the measures to deal with contaminated water at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, liquid used to freeze the ground leaked from the “frozen earth wall” that was installed to prevent underground water from flowing into the buildings. The Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) is investigating the cause of the damage and replacing the pipes.

On the 16th of this month at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, an estimated 4 tons of liquid at minus 30 degrees Celsius, which is used as a “refrigerant” to build a “frozen earth wall” to freeze the ground around the buildings, leaked. The leakage was estimated to be about 4 tons.

Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) investigated the leak and found that the joints between the pipes that feed the refrigerant and the underground pipes used to freeze the ground had shifted.

The parts of the joint were replaced by the 22nd of this month. The parts of other pipes will be replaced in the future and the cause of the shift of the joint is still being investigated.
https://www3.nhk.or.jp/lnews/fukushima/20220125/6050017050.html?fbclid=IwAR2oxPXF79fFf2r3EpIMvW7CLRrpys6OdsKPbPJuOeGf0_344tVeP6VBaxo

January 26, 2022 Posted by | Fuk 2022 | , , | Leave a comment

Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Incineration Facility to Start Operations in March, TEPCO Aims to Eliminate Outdoor Storage of Waste from Decommissioning Work, Including Logging / Fukushima

A facility for incinerating wood from logging and other waste piled up in the open at the Fukushima No. 1 Nuclear Power Plant

January 22, 2022

An incineration facility is expected to start full-scale operations in March to burn trees and other materials cut down to secure land for storage tanks for contaminated and treated water at TEPCO’s Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. The amount of waste from the decommissioning of the plant continues to increase, and much of it is being stored outdoors. TEPCO hopes to reduce the amount of waste by incineration and eliminate outdoor storage by FY2028.

 The facility is a five-story building. It will incinerate wood, paper and other combustible materials contained in debris, as well as waste oil, and will process up to 95 tons per day.

https://mainichi.jp/articles/20220122/ddl/k07/040/054000c?fbclid=IwAR0sjZ27VTWTemdy0q-QdHZ84XbMDi3qzJGimyLB4eP-YePcujxIJnS9gxE

January 26, 2022 Posted by | Fuk 2022 | , , | 1 Comment

TEPCO reports coolant solution leakage at Fukushima nuclear plant

University students rally in front of the Japanese Embassy in South Korea to protest the Japanese government’s decision to dump nuclear wastewater into the sea, in Seoul, April 14, 2021. /CFP

23-Jan-2022

Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO), the operator of Japan’s crippled Fukushima nuclear power plant, has discovered that a coolant solution used to create an ice wall halting groundwater seepage into the reactor buildings has leaked from two storage tanks, Reuters reported on Sunday.

The company claims that there has been no impact on the wall or the environment, according to the report.

Still, it underscores the unpredictable challenges in the clean-up of the site, nearly 11 years after an earthquake and tsunami ravaged Japan’s northeastern coast, causing the world’s worst nuclear disaster since the Chernobyl accident in 1986.

On Sunday, TEPCO spokesperson Tsuyoshi Shiraishi said about four tonnes of a calcium chloride solution used to maintain the ice wall had leaked for the eighth time.

In the last such accident in December 2019, 16 tonnes spilled, likely due to metal fatigue resulting from vibrations caused by construction vehicles, Shiraishi said, adding that TEPCO is “now confirming the reason.”

There was no immediate impact on the wall’s function as it takes several months for the wall to thaw in the absence of coolant, he said.

Work on the underground frozen wall around unit 1-4began in June 2014 to block the flow of groundwater into the plant’s basements, according to China Media Group.

The 1.5-kilometer wall, which became operational in 2017, is made up of 1,568 pipes filled with a refrigerant and inserted 30 meters underground, turning the soil into a solid mass.

Only last year, Japan’s government approved the release of over 1 million tonnes of irradiated water from the site after treatment, starting around spring 2023. TEPCO last month said it would build a tunnel reaching into the sea for the operation.

Separately, a group of six men and women is set to file on January 27 a lawsuit against TEPCO claiming they developed thyroid cancer due to exposure to radiation from the Fukushima disaster, the Mainichi newspaper reported.

https://news.cgtn.com/news/2022-01-23/TEPCO-admits-coolant-solution-leaked-at-Fukushima-nuclear-plant-173qEVNvCPm/index.html

January 24, 2022 Posted by | Fuk 2022 | , , | Leave a comment

Coolant solution leaks at Fukushima Daiichi plant

The frozen wall was a temporary solution for maximum 7 years and the time has run out anyway.

Jan. 22, 2022

The operator of the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant says coolant solution used to create a frozen soil wall around reactor buildings has leaked.

The underground barrier is meant to block groundwater from flowing into the reactor buildings that were damaged as a result of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami.

Tokyo Electric Power Company has been using a calcium chloride solution to maintain the barrier. The firm has been storing the liquid at minus 30 degrees Celsius in four tanks.

TEPCO says liquid levels in two of the tanks dropped on January 16. It says its workers found a pool of the solution near the wall and estimated roughly 4 tons of it had leaked.

The utility says the wall remains capable of keeping groundwater out as it takes several months before the barrier begins to thaw. It adds that the solution does not harm the environment.

TEPCO says the pipe circulating the solution may have been partially damaged. It says it will pinpoint the damaged section and fix it as soon as possible.

January 24, 2022 Posted by | Fuk 2022 | , , | Leave a comment

Japan’s Tepco hit by setback in clean-up of crippled Fukushima nuclear plant

Good faith does not exist in Tepco’s dictionary!

TOKYO, Jan 23 (Reuters) – The operator of Japan’s crippled Fukushima nuclear power plant has found that a coolant solution, used to create an ice wall halting the seepage of groundwater into reactor buildings, has leaked from two storage tanks.

The leakage has had no impact on the wall or environment, said Tokyo Electric Power Co Holdings Inc (Tepco) (9501.T).

Still, it underscores the unpredictable challenges in the clean-up of the site, nearly 11 year after an earthquake and tsunami ravaged Japan’s northeastern coast, causing the world’s worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl, Ukraine, in 1986.

Only last year, Japan’s government approved the release of over 1 million tonnes of irradiated water from the site after treatment, starting around spring 2023. Tepco last month said it would build a tunnel reaching into the sea for the operation. read more

On Sunday, Tepco spokesperson Tsuyoshi Shiraishi said about four tonnes of a calcium chloride solution used to maintain the ice wall had leaked in what was the eighth such leakage.

“We’re now confirming the reason,” he said.

The last leak in December 2019 saw 16 tonnes spilled, likely due to metal fatigue resulting from vibrations caused by construction vehicles, Shiraishi said.

There was no immediate impact on the wall’s function as it takes several months for the wall to thaw in the absence of coolant, he said.

Separately, a group of six men and women is set to file on Jan. 27 a lawsuit against Tepco claiming they developed thyroid cancer due to exposure to radiation from the Fukushima disaster, the Mainichi newspaper reported.

The plaintiffs, who were minors living in Fukushima prefecture at the time of the 2011 disaster, are seeking 616 million yen ($5.42 million) in compensation from the electricity provider, the Mainichi said.

If the complaint was served, Tepco would respond in good faith after hearing the contents of the claims and arguments in detail, the firm said in a statement.

https://www.reuters.com/world/asia-pacific/japans-tepco-hit-by-setback-clean-up-crippled-fukushima-nuclear-plant-2022-01-23/

January 24, 2022 Posted by | Fuk 2022 | , , | Leave a comment

Leakage of 4 tons of liquid at minus 30 degrees Celsius at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

The frozen wall was a temporary solution for maximum 7 years and the time has run out anyway.

January 23, 2022

There was a problem at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant where about 4 tons of liquid leaked out of a pipe that was injected into the ground to freeze the ground as part of the “frozen earth wall” that forms an “ice wall” around the buildings to prevent the inflow of underground water. Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) believes that a part of the pipe may have been damaged, and has decided to hurry to identify the location and repair it.

According to TEPCO, on January 16, the water level dropped in two of the four tanks that contain liquid at minus 30 degrees Celsius, which is used to freeze the ground around the buildings at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, and when they checked the area around the frost wall, they found a place where this liquid had accumulated.

The leaked liquid is a calcium chloride solution that acts as a “refrigerant” to freeze the ground, and it is estimated that about 4 tons of the liquid leaked from the water level of the tanks.

Even if the refrigerant leaks out, there is still a few months before the freezing wall itself starts to melt, so it is still functioning to prevent the inflow of groundwater, according to the report.

Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) believes that part of the pipe may have been damaged, and is hurrying to identify the location and repair it.

The freezing wall has been in operation since 2016, but last year some parts of the freezing wall experienced problems with the underground temperature remaining above 0 degrees Celsius, and TEPCO is investigating the cause and taking countermeasures.
https://www3.nhk.or.jp/news/html/20220123/k10013445291000.html?fbclid=IwAR06soHF-koVniJxnYVyMeADSSul3AXZTrGbMAW7folqVBtmfgk93cS5TLs

January 24, 2022 Posted by | Fuk 2022 | , , | Leave a comment

Call for Japan to join nuclear ban treaty on 1st anniversary

Members of a civic group call on Japan to sign the U.N. Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons near the Atomic Bomb Dome in Hiroshima on Jan. 22. (Jun Ueda)

January 23, 2022

Supporters of a U.N. treaty banning nuclear weapons gathered Jan. 22 in Hiroshima and Nagasaki to mark the first anniversary of the pact going into force, stepping up their calls on Japan to sign it.

Standing in front of the symbolic Atomic Bomb Dome in Hiroshima, 10 or so members of a Hiroshima-based group calling for the abolition of nuclear weapons hoisted a banner that read the “whole world should join the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.”

“Unless Japan, the only country in the world to have been ravaged by atomic bombing, speaks out in the international community, it will be impossible to eliminate nuclear weapons,” said Shuichi Adachi, a lawyer representing the group.

Participation in the rally was kept to a minimum as a safety precaution against the COVID-19 pandemic.

Tomoyuki Mimaki, a representative of the association of A- and H-bomb sufferers in Hiroshima Prefecture, expressed disappointment with a joint statement released Jan. 21 by Tokyo and Washington on the issue of nuclear weapons.

“They treated the question with kid gloves,” he said dismissively, noting that although the statement encouraged the world’s political leaders and youth to visit Hiroshima and Nagasaki, it made no reference to the treaty.

Mimaki, 72, said he sent a letter to Prime Minister Fumio Kishida, who is from a constituency in Hiroshima, urging Japanese representatives to attend the first meeting of signatory countries of the treaty in Austria in March as observers.

Attendance on the part of Japan, he said, is indispensable as Kishida has pledged that Tokyo will work as an intermediary between the nuclear and nonnuclear powers.

In Nagasaki, about 150 nuclear-bomb survivors and their supporters gathered in the Peace Park to press the Japanese government to join and ratify the treaty.

“The government continues to ignore the treaty even though many countries have signed it,” said Shigemitsu Tanaka, president of the Nagasaki Atomic-bomb Survivors Council. “We want to get the public become familiar with the treaty so we can join forces in applying pressure on the government.”

Fifty-nine countries and territories have ratified the treaty.

But the nuclear powers as well as Japan, which is protected under the U.S. nuclear umbrella for its defense purposes, have refrained from doing so.

According to the Japan Council against Atomic and Hydrogen Bombs, 627 assemblies, or 35 percent, of the 1,788 local governments, including those at the prefectural level, had adopted a resolution as of Jan. 12 calling on the Japanese government to sign and ratify the treaty.

The figure included 90 or so local governments that adopted the resolution after the treaty went into force in 2021.

“The resolution adopted by local governments reflects public opinion and thus is more visible,” said Shiro Maekawa, an official of the council who tracks the trend among local governments on the issue. “The Japanese government should hear what the public says.”

https://www.asahi.com/ajw/articles/14528449

January 24, 2022 Posted by | Japan | , , | Leave a comment

Trickle of residents return to Fukushima’s last deserted town

Futaba, whose population of around 5,600 was forced to flee over radiation fears, had been the final deserted municipality in the Fukushima region

Jan. 21, 2022

TOKYO – Five former residents of the last remaining uninhabited town near Japan’s stricken Fukushima nuclear plant returned on Thursday to live there for the first time since the 2011 disaster.

Following extensive decontamination, numerous areas around the plant in northeast Japan have been declared safe after a huge earthquake and tsunami triggered a meltdown over a decade ago.

TV footage showed the returnees inspecting the buildings, with one testing a tap outside his house.

“It’s out! This is the first time in 10 years and 11 months that running water comes out,” he said.

Futaba, whose population of around 5,600 was forced to flee over radiation fears, had been the final deserted municipality in the Fukushima region.

But restrictions were lifted in a small part of the town in March 2020 and the government is preparing to lift the cordon on a wider area later this year.

A local official told AFP that five people from four households are returning to live in Futaba on a trial basis, the first of just 15 people who have applied to a scheme, working towards a permanent return to the town.

The group had already been back to visit Futaba, but Thursday marks the first time they will stay overnight.

They can live there as part of the trial until at least June, when the wider cordon is expected to be lifted and their residence can become permanent, the official said.

The scheme “aims to ensure that residents will be able to live without problems, by, for example, checking if the sewers function well and there are facilities to support everyday life”, a cabinet office official in charge of supporting Fukushima residents told AFP.

More than 18,400 people died or remain missing after the 9.0-magnitude quake and tsunami on March 11, 2011 which sparked the nuclear disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi plant.

The government has undertaken an extensive decontamination programme in the region, literally scraping layers of topsoil, among other methods to remove radiation.

It has gradually declared areas safe for residents to return, with just 2.4 percent of the prefecture still covered by no-go orders as of last year.

But in some places, evacuees have been reluctant to return even after measures are lifted, worried about persistent radiation or fully resettled in other places.

https://japantoday.com/category/national/trickle-of-residents-return-to-fukushima%27s-last-deserted-town

January 24, 2022 Posted by | Fuk 2022 | , , | Leave a comment

Beer made with Fukushima rice launched in HK

Beer anyone? NO THANKS!

Jan. 21, 2022

A brewery in Hong Kong has unveiled a craft beer made with rice grown in Fukushima Prefecture, northeastern Japan. Hong Kong restricts imports of many agricultural products from the prefecture following the 2011 nuclear accident, but rice is allowed in.

The company invited the media and Consul-General of Japan, Okada Kenichi, to a launch event on Kowloon Peninsula on Thursday.

It produced the beer at the request of Fukushima Prefecture and Japan Agricultural Cooperatives, or JA.

It is made with a brand of rice called “Ten-no-tsubu”.

JA says Hong Kong imports 3 tons of Ten-no-tsubu rice every year. The craft beer will be sold at events promoting foods from Fukushima Prefecture.

The head of JA’s Hong Kong office says he wants people there to learn about the rice brand, so it will lead them to buy other food products from the prefecture.

https://www3.nhk.or.jp/nhkworld/en/news/20220121_16/

January 24, 2022 Posted by | Fuk 2022 | , , | Leave a comment

6 people to sue TEPCO over thyroid cancer after Fukushima nuclear disaster

How may Tepco use now the word “sincerely” when they have shown the whole world their dishonesty and their lack of sincerity repeatedly for the past 10 years?

Kenichi Ido, left, head of the legal team for a group of plaintiffs set to sue TEPCO over thyroid cancer, speaks during a press conference in Tokyo on Jan. 19, 2022. (Mainichi/Kazuhiro Toyama)

January 21, 2022 (Mainichi Japan)

TOKYO — A group of six young men and women is set to file a class action suit against Tokyo Electric Power Company Holdings Inc. (TEPCO) claiming that they developed thyroid cancer due to exposure to radiation emanating from the Fukushima nuclear disaster, and demand the utility pay a total of 616 million yen (about $5.4 million) in compensation.

It will be the first group lawsuit in Japan by those who were minors at the time of the 2011 nuclear disaster and have since been diagnosed with thyroid cancer.

The plaintiffs, now aged between 17 and 27, were living in Fukushima Prefecture when the nuclear meltdowns occurred at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station in March 2011, and developed thyroid cancer after the disaster. They are filing the damages suit with the Tokyo District Court on Jan. 27, according to the legal counsel for the plaintiffs who revealed the plan at a press conference on Jan. 19.

An expert investigation committee set up by the Fukushima Prefectural Government has not recognized the causal relationship between radiation exposure from the Fukushima disaster and thyroid cancer, and whether there is such a correlation could be the focal issue in the lawsuit.

The six plaintiffs were aged between 6 and 16 at the time of the nuclear disaster. They were diagnosed with thyroid cancer between 2012 and 2018. Two of them had one side of their thyroid removed, while the other four had their thyroid fully extracted and need to take hormonal drugs for the rest of their lives. One of the patients had cancer spread to their lungs. Some of them currently reside in Tokyo and Kanagawa Prefecture.

The Fukushima Prefectural Government has conducted a survey on thyroid glands covering some 380,000 people aged 18 or younger who were living in Fukushima Prefecture at the time of the nuclear catastrophe. As of June 2021, 266 people had been diagnosed with thyroid cancer or suspected thyroid cancer. According to the legal team for the plaintiffs, five of the six complainants had their cancer detected in the prefectural survey. The remaining plaintiff found out about their cancer through testing at a hospital they voluntarily underwent.

According to the legal counsel, the cancer discovery rate in the Fukushima Prefecture survey stands several tens of times higher than usual. While the prefectural government points to the possibility of “overdiagnosis” through which many cancer cases requiring no treatment have been found, the plaintiffs’ cancer has actually progressed, the legal team asserted. The lawyers argue that none of the six plaintiffs’ cancer is hereditary, and that it is extremely highly likely that they developed their conditions due to the nuclear disaster.

In past pollution lawsuits including those over Minamata disease, there is a court precedent in which the company responsible for the pollution was ruled liable for compensation unless it could prove there was no causal relationship between the contamination and the plaintiffs’ diseases. The attorneys for the upcoming lawsuit claim that this decision could also be applied to nuclear plant accidents and that TEPCO should bear the burden of proving the absence of a causal link between radiation exposure and thyroid cancer.

Kenichi Ido, head of the legal counsel, commented, “Some plaintiffs have had difficulties advancing to higher education and finding jobs, and even given up on their dreams for their future.”

TEPCO released a comment saying, “We will respond to the case sincerely after hearing the content of their claims and their arguments in detail.”

(Japanese original by Kazuhiro Toyama, Tokyo City News Department)

https://mainichi.jp/english/articles/20220121/p2a/00m/0na/018000c

January 24, 2022 Posted by | Fuk 2022 | , , , , | Leave a comment

Tepco sued over thyroid cancer cases – 6 people aged 6-16 at time of Fukushima nuclear accident – Tokyo District Court

Kenichi Ido, a former judge and head of the legal team, pointed out that “the Japanese government is assuming that there is no health damage caused by the accident. Hiroyuki Kawai, a lawyer, said, “There is strong social pressure to believe that cancer is not caused by the accident, and it took a lot of courage for the six people to file the lawsuit, which is why the time has come.

Lawyers hold a press conference on the policy of filing lawsuits for six people who have developed thyroid cancer in Chiyoda Ward, Tokyo on the afternoon of March 19.

January 19, 2022

Six people who were between the ages of 6 and 16 years old at the time of the accident at the Fukushima No. 1 Nuclear Power Plant of Tokyo Electric Power Co. On April 19, it was learned that six people, aged 6-16 at the time of the accident and living in Fukushima Prefecture, will file a lawsuit against TEPCO in the Tokyo District Court, seeking a total of 616 million yen in damages. This is believed to be the first lawsuit in which residents are suing for damage caused by the nuclear accident on the grounds that they have developed thyroid cancer.

The legal team representing the six revealed this at a press conference on the same day. The lawsuit is scheduled to be filed on the 27th.
 According to the lawyers, the six are currently residing in Tokyo, Kanagawa, and Fukushima prefectures. Four of them have had their thyroid glands surgically removed, and some have undergone multiple surgeries because of metastasis or recurrence.
 The Fukushima Prefectural Health Survey, which covers about 380,000 people who were under the age of 18 at the time of the accident, revealed 266 cases of cancer or suspected cancer in its report last October. In October last year, it was revealed that 266 people had cancer or suspected cancer. Some experts have pointed out the possibility of “over-diagnosis,” in which cancers that do not require treatment are found, but the lawyers are claiming that all six of the cases required surgery, and that this was due to the accident.
 On the other hand, the review committee for the prefectural health survey has stated that radiation is unlikely to be a factor in the development of thyroid cancer.
 Kenichi Ido, a former judge and head of the legal team, pointed out that “the Japanese government is assuming that there is no health damage caused by the accident. Hiroyuki Kawai, a lawyer, said, “There is strong social pressure to believe that cancer is not caused by the accident, and it took a lot of courage for the six people to file the lawsuit, which is why the time has come.
 TEPCO commented, “If the complaint is served, we will respond in good faith.
https://www.jiji.com/jc/article?k=2022011900881&g=soc&fbclid=IwAR0jA-AAx_XojY5Yngsp4n7eU8UrPgEU8A66AiSEXanInMIleC49saU_MWE

January 24, 2022 Posted by | Fuk 2022 | , , , , | Leave a comment

Signatures submitted to Tokyo High Court for site inspection, totaling 10,195

Jan. 21, 2022

On the morning of January 21, in the cold wind, the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Criminal Litigation Support Group submitted the third round of signatures to the Tokyo High Court to demand that the presiding judge of the 10th Criminal Division of the Tokyo High Court, Keisuke Hosoda, decide on the on-site inspection and examination of witnesses.

 In the criminal trial of the three former TEPCO executives who were forcibly indicted, the appeal trial at the Tokyo High Court started in November last year, and the key is to realize the on-site verification by the judges who were not employed in the first trial.

 At the second trial on February 9 at 2:00 p.m., the decision on whether or not to hold the on-site inspection and witness examination will be made, and this will be a major turning point in the appeal trial.

 At 10:30 a.m. on the morning of the 21st, more than 100 citizens gathered in front of the Tokyo High Court, despite the bitter cold, and the leader of the support group and lawyers representing the victims, Kaito and Okawa, appealed to the Tokyo High Court to conduct on-site inspection and questioning of witnesses.

 A little after 11:00 a.m., the leader of the support group and other representatives of the group, including attorneys Kaito and Okawa, submitted their signatures to the Criminal Division 10 of the Tokyo High Court. A total of 10,195 signatures were submitted so far, including 2,151 for the third round.

 While taking measures against coronary infection, the participants once again confirmed that they would rally for the second trial on February 9 at 2:00 p.m., aiming for victory in the appeal trial of the Fukushima nuclear power plant criminal trial to hold TEPCO responsible for the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident.

https://skazuyoshi.exblog.jp/29816568/?fbclid=IwAR1eoQIEW3YpTVXKb40E1jjCU5WTc0jdY68se5UGvBVorywP8UEFMxB5ro0

January 24, 2022 Posted by | Fuk 2022 | , , , | Leave a comment

Robot for removing nuclear fuel debris at Fukushima Daiichi

19 janv. 2022

Footage of a robot developed to remove nuclear fuel debris from the No. 2 reactor at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant is released.

January 20, 2022 Posted by | Fuk 2022 | , , , | Leave a comment