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Fukushima Thyroid-Cancer Victims Take TEPCO to Court

March 2, 2022

PRESS CONFERENCE: Fukushima Thyroid-Cancer Victims Take TEPCO to Court

Kenichi Ido, Attorney, Lead Counsel for the 3.11 Children’s Thyroid Cancer Lawsuit

Hiroyuki Kawai, Attorney, Co-counsel for the 3.11 Children’s Thyroid Cancer Lawsuit

March 3, 2022 Posted by | Fuk 2022 | , , | Leave a comment

Fukushima Disaster’s Impact on Health Will Be Challenged in Court 

By Thisanka Siripala

February 17, 2022

A link between radiation from the Fukushima nuclear disaster and cancer will be the focal point of the civil court case against operator TEPCO.

Almost 11 years have passed since the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant catastrophe. But even as Fukushima prefecture gets ready to launch a new revitalization slogan – “Making Fukushima’s reconstruction a reality one step at a time” – it is still struggling to overcome the lingering aftereffects of the accident. Earlier this month, a group of six men and women diagnosed with thyroid cancer as children filed a class action case against Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO), seeking $5.4 million in compensation.

Eastern Japan was hit by a massive magnitude 9.1 earthquake and 15-meter tsunami on March 11, 2011. The disaster shut off power and cooling to three reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, triggering the release of radiation for up to six days.

The plaintiffs, who are aged between 17 and 27, are seeking to hold TEPCO responsible for the thyroid cancer they developed. Two have had one side of their thyroid removed and four others have had a complete thyroidectomy and are planning or undergoing radiation therapy. The treatment has forced them to drop out of school or college and give up on their dreams. The plaintiffs argue that their thyroid cancer has created barriers to their education and employment as well as marriage and starting a family.

The Fukushima Daiichi meltdown was the worst nuclear accident since Chernobyl in 1986, which was followed by a spike in cancer cases in the region. In Japan a health survey conducted by the Fukushima prefecture found 266 cases of cancer among the 380,000 people aged under 18 at the time of the accident. The lawyers representing the plaintiffs argue that pediatric thyroid cancer is extremely rare, with an annual incident rate of two cases in one million people.

The plaintiffs added that in the past decade they have been forced to stay silent due to social pressure and the risk of public outrage over speaking out about the connection between the Fukushima nuclear accident and their thyroid cancer.

The Federation of Promotion of Zero-Nuclear Power and Renewable Energy, a civic group that includes five former Japanese prime ministers, sent a letter to the EU urging the elimination of nuclear power. In the letter, they stated that many children are suffering from thyroid cancer as a result of the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident.

However, the Japanese government believes there is no causal link between exposure to radiation from the accident and the children developing thyroid cancer. Prime Minister Kishida Fumio said at a House of Representatives Budget Committee meeting that “it is not appropriate to spread false information that children from Fukushima are suffering from health problems.”

At a press conference Takaichi Sanae, chairperson of the ruling LDP’s Policy Research Council refuted the letter sent by the federation. She stressed the government’s position that the cases of childhood thyroid cancer have been assessed by experts who have determined the accident is unlikely to have caused cancer.

Fukushima prefecture’s expert panel say there could be the possibility of “over-diagnosis” due to increased vigilance after the disaster, suggesting that some patients diagnosed with cancer did not need treatment. They say they are continuing to investigate the nature of each diagnosis. The Ministry of Environment also said they will continue to disseminate knowledge based on scientific findings to dispel rumors about the health effects of radiation.

Last week, the Fukushima reconstruction and revitalization council met to discuss the “diverse needs of the prefecture” and a long term response to support evacuees. Governor of Fukushima Uchibori Masao acknowledged that the prefecture is “facing many difficulties including the reconstruction and rehabilitation of evacuated areas and rebuilding the lives of evacuees and victims of the disaster.” There are also plans to establish a new national research and education organization in Fukushima that will devise measures to prevent and dispel rumors fueling discrimination toward evacuees and Fukushima food.

Taiwan recently lifted its blanket food import ban on Fukushima produce introduced in the wake of the disaster but there are 14 countries and regions that still maintain import restrictions. Additionally, Japan’s decision to discharge more than one million tonnes of low-level radioactive water from the crippled Fukushima nuclear power plant into the sea is another issue attracting negative publicity abroad.

https://thediplomat.com/2022/02/fukushima-disasters-impact-on-health-will-be-challenged-in-court/

February 20, 2022 Posted by | Fuk 2022 | , , | Leave a comment

Fukushima Thyroid Cancer in Kids – Epidemiologist Joseph Mangano – NH #556

  • Joseph Mangano is Executive director of Radiation and Public Health Project.  He is an epidemiologist – one who searches for the cause of disease, identifies people who are at risk, determines how to control or stop the spread, or prevent it from happening again. Joe has over 30 years of experience working with nuclear numbers and comes from a history of teasing out health information from data.  We spoke on Friday, February 11, 2022.

http://nuclearhotseat.com/2022/02/16/fukushima-thyroid-cancer-in-kids-mangano/?fbclid=IwAR2d_WRilJ3HlDPNgRKAMz3bU_cB77kLW3TJ_DvNzC25kFDTWHK9TFVrMjs

February 17, 2022 Posted by | Fuk 2022 | , , , | Leave a comment

Five successive prime ministers saying that “many children suffer from thyroid cancer”

February 4, 2022

Environment Minister Tsuyoshi Yamaguchi has complained about five successive prime ministers saying that “many children suffer from thyroid cancer.” However, pediatric thyroid cancer is a rare disease that only occurs in one million people, but after the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident, 266 people (10 years) have been diagnosed out of 38,000 people. Why don’t you say a lot of this?” (Attorney Takayuki Fujioka)

We received a letter of protest from Mr. Yamaguchi, Minister of the Environment, regarding the joint statement by five former prime ministers compiled and released by JAERI. In response to this, JAERI has released a rebuttal and questions. In this video, Hiroyuki Kawai, the secretary general of JAERI, talks about the issues involved. Click here for the full text of the rebuttal and questions

https://twitter.com/genjiren2017/status/1489409614248497154

February 7, 2022 Posted by | Fuk 2022 | , , , | Leave a comment

Release] Protest against the condemnation of the letter of the five former prime ministers

Protest Statement

Feb. 4, 2022

311 Children’s Thyroid Cancer Trial Lawyers: Kenichi Ido, Chief of the Defense Team, Hiroyuki Kawai, Vice-Chairman, Yuichi Kaiwata

Five former prime ministers who are truly concerned about the future of Japan (Junichiro Koizumi, Morihiro Hosokawa, Naoto Kan, Yukio Hatoyama, and Tomiichi Murayama) sent a letter to the President of the European Commission on January 27, 2022. In a letter dated January 27, 2022, five former prime ministers (Ichiro Koizumi, Morihiro Hosokawa, Naoto Kan, Yukio Hatoyama, and Tomiichi Murayama) wrote to the President of the European Commission entitled “Nuclear and Carbon Free: Excluding Nuclear Power from the EU Taxonomy is Possible. -In the letter, he talks about the current situation in Fukushima. In response to the passage in the letter that “many children are suffering from thyroid cancer”, Goshi Hosono, a member of the Diet, tweeted about the current situation in Fukushima, So Yamaguchi, Minister of the Environment, wrote a letter to five former prime ministers, Takaichi Takai, Chairman of the General Affairs Committee of the Liberal Democratic Party, expressed his protest, Uchibori, Governor of Fukushima Prefecture, made an appeal, and Kishida, Prime Minister of Japan, responded to the Budget Committee. The LDP Fukushima prefectural federation has sent a letter of protest, and the government and the LDP have attacked and condemned each other. The reasons for this are that the above passage is “erroneous information” (Minister of Environment, Prime Minister Kishida), “erroneous content” (Chairman of the General Affairs Council Koichi), “contrary to scientific facts” (Hosono Rep.), “encourages unwarranted discrimination and prejudice” (Minister of Environment, Prime Minister Kishida), “brings anxiety to the youth of Fukushima” (Hosono Rep.), and “causes (Hosono), and “spreading rumors based on false information” (Takaichi, Chairman of the Board of Governors).

However, it is an undeniable fact that pediatric thyroid cancer, which was said to occur in only one or two children per million people per year before the Fukushima nuclear accident, has increased in Fukushima Prefecture in the 11 years since the accident, with 266 cases in the Fukushima Prefectural Health Survey and 27 cases in other surveys, for a total of at least 293 cases.

The above accusation by the Liberal Democratic Party may be an attempt to say that radiation exposure is not the cause of the high incidence of childhood thyroid cancer, but this is not a scientifically settled issue and their statement is “inaccurate information. The Fukushima Prefectural Citizens’ Health Study Review Committee and UNSCEAR (United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation) UNSCEAR (United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation) deny the existence of a cause-and-effect relationship, it does not mean that these organizations have the authority to determine the existence of a cause-and-effect relationship. On the other hand, there are many experts who argue that a causal relationship should be recognized.

In this regard, the Ministry of the Environment seems to be based on the so-called over-diagnosis theory that the screening of the Fukushima Prefectural Health Survey only finds a large number of latent cancers that do not progress even if left untreated, but the over-diagnosis theory is not a proven theory. However, the over-diagnosis theory is not a proven theory. On the contrary, the scheme of the Fukushima Prefectural Health Survey was carefully designed to avoid over-diagnosis and over-treatment while fully recognizing the existence of latent cancers among thyroid cancers. When a cancer is found, it is not removed in a hasty manner. Rather, the progress of the cancer is assessed and its invasion into the surrounding tissues and metastasis to the surrounding lymph nodes are carefully investigated, and surgery is performed only in cases that meet the indications for surgery stipulated in the thyroid treatment guidelines. The thyroid surgeon who performed the removal of pediatric thyroid cancer in Fukushima Prefecture has clearly denied that he overdiagnosed the disease.

Pediatric thyroid cancer is said to progress more rapidly than thyroid cancer in adults. Although Fukushima Prefecture has not disclosed the total number of cases, it appears that a significant number of children have had recurrences after surgery. Of the six pediatric thyroid cancer patients who filed a claim for damages against TEPCO on January 27, four of them had their cancers recur after surgery. Is the Ministry of the Environment saying that these cases are also overdiagnosed?

All of the children in Fukushima Prefecture were exposed to a certain amount of radiation. It is natural for children who suffer from extremely rare diseases caused by exposure to radiation to suspect that exposure is the cause. According to a survey conducted by the NPO 3.11 Thyroid Cancer Children’s Fund, the number of children and adolescents suffering from thyroid cancer has been increasing. According to a survey conducted by the NPO 3.11 Children’s Fund for Thyroid Cancer, about 60% of children and their families affected by thyroid cancer believe that the cause of the disease is exposure to radiation. However, lawsuits claiming compensation for damages by pediatric thyroid cancer patients have only just been filed. One of the plaintiffs stated at the press conference for the lawsuit that he could not even tell that he had thyroid cancer. I strongly fear that this series of bashing will make it harder than ever for pediatric thyroid cancer patients and their families to speak out about their feelings and questions. They should be aware that their comments are the ones that “promote discrimination and prejudice” and cause secondary damage to the young people and their families in Fukushima.

What the government and the administration should do is to conduct a thorough investigation into whether or not the high incidence of thyroid cancer in children is caused by exposure to radiation, make the data public, have open discussions with the public, and if a cause-and-effect relationship cannot be denied, have TEPCO promptly compensate the victims. We also need to establish a permanent support system to relieve the suffering of the young people in Fukushima. Rather than suppressing the anxiety of pediatric thyroid cancer patients and their families and silencing them, the role of the government should be to eliminate any discrimination and prejudice that may be caused by the revelation of the facts.

The cause of the high incidence of pediatric thyroid cancer in Fukushima Prefecture must continue to be investigated in order to reach a scientific conclusion. The lawsuit filed by patients against TEPCO has just started. The Lawyers Committee strongly protests against this series of unjustified bashing of the five former prime ministers by the government and the Liberal Democratic Party.

That is all.

Source: Support Network 311: Children with Thyroid Cancer

https://www.311support.net/post/%E6%8A%97-%E8%AD%B0-%E5%A3%B0-%E6%98%8E?fbclid=IwAR3vKaXto3gRyNByZmHyWRB59aNX7FMf7yIoXzkAryINdwAEPwrFDh2xSWA

February 4, 2022 Posted by | Fuk 2022 | , , , , | Leave a comment

Environment Minister Yamaguchi flirts with five former prime ministers: “Thyroid cancer has nothing to do with the nuclear accident.

National Diet of Japan, House of Representatives, Budget Committee, General Questions, Environment Minister Tsuyoshi Yamaguchi

February 2, 2022

Environment Minister Sou Yamaguchi announced on Wednesday that he had sent letters of protest to five former prime ministers, including Junichiro Koizumi and Morihiro Hosokawa, for spreading false information about the health effects of radiation on children in Fukushima Prefecture.

 Koizumi and Hosokawa, as well as Naoto Kan, Yukio Hatoyama and Tomiichi Murayama, are opposed to the European Commission’s decision to include nuclear power plants as a “green” investment that contributes to decarbonization, as many children are suffering from thyroid cancer due to the accident at Tokyo Electric Power Co. He had sent a statement to the chairman of the committee dated last month 27. In his letter, Mr. Yamaguchi complained that the wording of the statement by the former prime minister and others “may lead to discrimination and prejudice and is not appropriate.
https://www.nikkan-gendai.com/articles/view/life/300797?fbclid=IwAR22vMJNVWo6niqyS-xO8yf7TpCS8TNhoTnMwt8UjtoE1jSeaKy_0AH5ZJY

February 4, 2022 Posted by | Fuk 2022 | , , , | Leave a comment

[Urgent Release] Examining the Significantly Reduced “Oral” Thyroid Radiation Exposure in the UNSCEAR 2020 Report

February 3, 2022

In a letter sent by five former prime ministers, including Junichiro Koizumi and Naoto Kan, to the European Commission, they stated that “many children are suffering from thyroid cancer” due to the accident at TEPCO’s Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant. Prime Minister Fumio Kishida responded at the Budget Committee of the House of Representatives on February 2 that the letter was inappropriate because it could spread false information that children in Fukushima Prefecture are suffering from health problems caused by radiation and promote unwarranted discrimination and prejudice. He responded. The governor of Fukushima Prefecture, Masao Uchibori, also wrote a letter to the former prime minister and others urging them to disseminate objective information based on “scientific findings,” saying that according to the opinions of experts, no causal relationship with radiation exposure has been recognized.

The basis for the current denial of thyroid cancer by the national and prefectural governments is that the thyroid exposure associated with the Fukushima nuclear accident is much lower than that of Chernobyl. However, the exact thyroid absorbed dose from the Fukushima nuclear accident has not been measured. All the figures currently being produced are merely estimates based on simulations and other data.

The same is true for the 2020 report of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), which the government places particular emphasis on. In particular, the 2020 report released in March last year is based on the same estimates as the agency’s 201 In particular, the 2020 report, which was released in March last year, is characterized by a significant decrease in the estimated radiation doses to the public compared to the report released in 2013. In the 2013 Report, the thyroid exposure from oral intake (infants (1 year old)) was uniformly 32.79 mGy in Fukushima Prefecture, but in the 2013 Report, it was significantly reduced from 1 to several mGy.

OurPlanetTV obtained 15,000 pieces of radioactive measurement data and meeting minutes from the Nuclear Regulation Authority and Fukushima Prefecture in the early stages of the accident. We added our own coverage and published the article in September last year.
Free release of Iwanami “Science” articles. https://www.ourplanet-tv.org/40513/

In response to the fact that the national government and the prefectural government have expressed the view that they deny the existence of thyroid cancer patients despite the fact that there are as many as 300 thyroid cancer patients, Iwanami Shoten will release the September 2021 issue of Science, which reports on the contamination of food immediately after the accident, in digital format free of charge.
https://www.ourplanet-tv.org/44455/?fbclid=IwAR0Z-2CfTEctWkfNg-GzphLXiTd7FCdnrnYwSodolzJz6DARqJkOdicPUb4

February 4, 2022 Posted by | Fuk 2022 | , , , | Leave a comment

Fukushima governor refutes ex-PMs’ anti-nuclear letter to EU

February 3, 2022

The governor of Fukushima has sent a written protest to five former Japanese prime ministers for saying that many children in the prefecture are suffering from thyroid cancer as a result of the 2011 nuclear accident.

Governor Uchibori Masao has taken issue with a letter the ex-leaders sent to the European Union last month calling on the bloc to pursue a nuclear-free society.

He wrote to the leaders on Wednesday, saying they should present objective information based on scientific evidence.

The letter dated January 27 and signed by Koizumi Junichiro, Hosokawa Morihiro, Kan Naoto, Hatoyama Yukio and Murayama Tomiichi, was a reaction to the EU’s plan to label some nuclear power plants as green investments.

Koizumi is an advisor to a private organization that promotes zero nuclear power and renewable energy.

The letter refers to the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant that was triggered by the 2011 quake and tsunami. The leaders say, “What we have witnessed in Fukushima over the last decade is an indescribable tragedy and contamination on an unprecedented scale.” They add, “many children are suffering from thyroid cancer.”

In Fukushima Prefecture, a survey has found 266 cases of confirmed or suspected thyroid cancer in people aged 18 years or younger at the time of the nuclear accident.

But a panel of experts commissioned by the prefecture says that no links have been established so far between the thyroid cancer cases and radiation exposure.

In his complaint to the ex-leaders, Governor Uchibori says providing accurate information based on scientific knowledge is crucial for the rebuilding of Fukushima.

He urged that when they refer to the current state of the prefecture, they should use objective information that is based on the prefecture’s views and reports by international scientific organizations.

Speaking at a Diet committee on Wednesday, Japanese Prime Minister Kishida Fumio called the letter by his predecessors inappropriate. Kishida said the letter spreads incorrect information that children in Fukushima are suffering health damage from radiation. He said it also raises concerns of promoting unreasonable discrimination and prejudice.

Last month, six people who were 6 to 16 years old and living in Fukushima at the time of the nuclear accident filed a lawsuit demanding that the plant operator pay damages for their thyroid cancer.

Their lawyers say this is the first time a group of residents has filed a lawsuit against Tokyo Electric Power Company over health problems they claim were caused by radiation from the nuclear accident.

The lawyers say the plaintiffs have had all or parts of their thyroid glands removed and some need lifetime hormonal treatment.

February 4, 2022 Posted by | Fuk 2022 | , , , , | Leave a comment

Open letter from five former Prime Ministers of Japan to the EU on nuclear power

February 2, 2022

Five former prime ministers of Japan wrote an open letter on 27 January to European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen asking her to review the proposal to consider nuclear energy as a possible alternative to fossil fuels.

The reasons for this demand lie in the consideration that nuclear energy is dangerous and uncontrollable, as the Three Mile Island disaster in the United States, Chernobyl in the former Soviet Union and the TEPCO plant in Fukushima have dramatically demonstrated.

This taxonomy also promotes the misconception that nuclear energy is a possible alternative to climate-altering sources when in fact the unresolved problem of nuclear waste and the danger inherent in nuclear power plants poses a risk to the environment and the very survival of mankind.

In the same letter, the German government’s decision to abandon nuclear energy, motivated in part by the Fukushima disaster itself, is considered courageous, and the European Union is urged to show the same courage by favouring only renewable sources among its energy conversion choices.

The letter in full

https://www.pressenza.com/2022/02/open-letter-from-five-former-prime-ministers-of-japan-to-the-eu-on-nuclear-power/

February 4, 2022 Posted by | Fuk 2022 | , , , | 1 Comment

Kishida says statement by five former prime ministers ‘inappropriate’: Thyroid cancer caused by Fukushima nuclear accident

Prime Minister Fumio Kishida (left foreground) speaks at the Budget Committee of the House of Representatives in the afternoon of February 2.

February 2, 2022

 Prime Minister Fumio Kishida criticized a statement issued by five former prime ministers, including Junichiro Koizumi and Morihiro Hosokawa, at the House of Representatives Budget Committee on Wednesday, saying that the statement was inappropriate because it included the suggestion that many children are suffering from thyroid cancer due to the accident at the Tokyo Electric Power Company’s Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant.

He was responding to a question from Yasushi Adachi of the Japan Restoration Association. The prime minister cited the fact that there is an assessment by experts that “at this point it is difficult to believe that this is an effect of radiation.
 The other five former prime ministers are Naoto Kan, Yukio Hatoyama, and Tomiichi Murayama. The statement, dated Jan. 27 and addressed to European Union (EU) Commission President VONDE ALAEN, objected to moves within the EU to promote nuclear power. The statement objected to moves in the EU to promote nuclear power generation, saying that “many children are suffering from thyroid cancer and an enormous amount of national wealth has disappeared” due to the accident at the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant.
https://www.jiji.com/jc/article?k=2022020201055&g=pol&fbclid=IwAR1dNKXb5JHqZI8EFYNLRgL6dizGQxmRL3EGc4v3m-4Ze6rCUlrH-mttOc4

February 3, 2022 Posted by | Fuk 2022 | , , , | Leave a comment

Fukushima Nuclear Disaster | Increased Thyroid Cancer in U.S.

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From 2013

Almost one third of children born on the Pacific coast of  the United States are now at high risk for thyroid cancer (and a host of other cancers that will be revealed over time.) The inevitable has happened. Radioactive Cesium isotopes from the leaking nucelar reactors in Fukushima, Japan have reached our Pacific shores and are contaminating our ocean, our, soil, our air, our food supply and our born and unborn children. This is only the shadow of things to come over the decades ahead.

When DNA, our genetic material is damaged,  the beginnings of cancer are at hand. Many cancers begin 20-30 years before diagnosis. So we really will not know all of the devastating health consequences of this nuclear disaster so far from our shores for a long long time. Pay attention. Cancer rates are sure to rise.

The fetus in the uterus of pregnant women, infants and young children, because they are growing so quickly and so their cells are dividing at a high rate and thus more vulnerable to DNA damage and  are much more vulnerable to the dangers of radiation exposure. Now we are seeing the troubling results that are the tip of the iceberg. I am reprinting this disturbing post from Nation of Change, on the tangible what we know is happening to our children…Thyroid Cancer risk. Many of the fish on the Pacific Coast have Cesium in their flesh. Now are food is contaminated and radioactive as well. Pay attention, radioactivity is invisible and insidious

Third of US West Coast Children Hit with Thyroid Problems Following Fukushima By Anthony Gucciardi

Still think that the Fukushima nuclear meltdown of 2011 never affected the United States public? Young children born in the United States West Coast, right in the line of fire for radioactive isotopes, have been found to be 28 percent more likely to develop congenital hypothyroidism than infants born the year before the incident.

The study followed children born in California, Alaska, Washingto, Hawaii, and Oregon between 1 and 16 weeks after the horrific meltdown at Fukushima back in March 2011. Published in the Open Journal of Pediatrics by researchers affiliated with the Radiation and Public Health Project, the information further lends credence to previous documentation regarding the way in which radioactive fallout ended up on US soil.

The researchers explained how radioactive fallout affected the entirety of the US in varying degrees:

Fukushima fallout appeared to affect all areas of the U.S., and was especially large in some, mostly in the western part of the nation,” they wrote.

Fukushima’s Effects on The US

The findings are likely no surprise to those who have been following the effects of Fukushima closely, as back in 2011 numerous reports surfaced regarding the ways in which Fukushima’s radioactive waste had made its way to the US geography in a big way. Despite Japanese officials downplaying the incident and its real devastating health consequences, even so much as to ignore the fact that Fukushima radiation was detected in Tokyo far beyond the evacuation zone, US scientists were quick to reveal their own measurements to the scientific community.
Even more shocking is the fact that hot particles, which are highly radioactive objects, have been found at 2 out of 3 Boston monitoring stations. In a new video report, nuclear experts detail the coming health epidemic that my result from Fukushima radiation: Read more

Scientists from UC Berkeley detailed even more concerning reports following the disaster, finding the highest cesium content in topsoil for each California location was consistent. The recordings were posted online along with the date of finding:

  • Sacramento, CA Topsoil on Aug. 16, 2011: Total Cesium @ 2.737 Bq/kg
  • Oakland, CA Topsoil on Sept. 8, 2011: Total Cesium @ 2.55 Bq/kg
  • Alameda, CA Topsoil on Apr. 6, 2011: Total Cesium @ 2.52 Bq/kg
  • San Diego, CA Topsoil on June 29, 2011: Total Cesium @ 2.51 Bq/kg
  • Sonoma, CA Topsoil on Apr. 27, 2011: Total Cesium @ 2.252 Bq/kg

But the levels were nothing compared to what Marco Kaltofen, PE, of the Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) recorded from his research. In his report presentation, entitled  ‘Radiation Exposure to the Population in Japan After the Earthquake’, Kaltofen found samples on US soil that were 108 times greater than what UC Berkley researchers were reporting.

http://www.integrativecanceranswers.com/fukushima-nuclear-disaster-increased-thyroid-cancer-in-u-s/?fbclid=IwAR0OfzQH5cfweUhFohkQKCOktyDp1RW5DIbZGHnAfOna2xx7yH-QRX0N9d8

January 12, 2020 Posted by | Fukushima 2020 | , , , | Leave a comment

Fukushima Journey, Pt. 2: Olympics Propaganda, Thyroid Cancers, Japanese Govt. Lies – 4 days in Fukushima Prefecture w/Beverly Findlay-Kaneko

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November 28, 2019

This Week’s Featured Interview:

  • Fukushima Journey: The “Disappearing” Nuclear Disaster – 4 days on-the-ground in Fukushima Prefecture with Beverly Findlay-Kaneko continues. She lived in Yokohama, Japan for 20 years until March 2011 after the Great Eastern Japan Earthquake. She worked at Yokohama National University and The Japan Times. Beverly has a Master’s degree in East Asian Studies from Stanford University, and speaks Japanese fluently.

    Since returning from Japan, Beverly and her husband, Yuji Kaneko, have been active in raising awareness about nuclear issues, including the nuclear accident at Fukushima. Their main activities have included organizing speaking tours, giving presentations, networking in activist and nuclear-impacted communities in the U.S. and Japan, and co-producing the annual Nuclear Hotseat podcast “Voices from Japan” special on Fukushima.

    This is the second half of the “Fukushima Journey” Nuclear Hotseat interview, based on more than three hours of source material. Pt. 1 appeared in episode #439 from November 19, 2019.

December 2, 2019 Posted by | fukushima 2019 | , , , , , | 1 Comment

Results of the first-round thyroid examination of the Fukushima Health Management Survey

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December 2, 2018
Abstract
After the accident occurred at the Tokyo Electric Power Company’s Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, the Fukushima Health Management Survey (FHMS) was initiated. The FHMS consists of a basic survey and four detailed surveys: a thyroid ultrasound examination, a comprehensive health check, a mental health and lifestyle survey, and a pregnancy and birth survey. In this article, we briefly summarized whether an association exists between radiation exposure and the observation of thyroid cancer cases according to the results of the first-round thyroid examination in the FMHS. Regarding this issue, Tsuda and his colleagues showed an association using an internal comparison (odds ratio (OR)=2.6, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.99-7.0) and an external comparison (incidence rate ratio =50, 95% CI : 25-90). However, for this internal comparison, Ohira and his colleagues used two ways of objective classifications of districts in Fukushima; (1) the group of municipalities of which proportion of the exposed external dose level of more than 5 mSv was higher than or equal to 1% (≧1% of 5 mSv), the group of municipalities of which proportion of the exposed external dose level less than 1 mSv was higher than or equal to 99.9% (≧99.9% of 1m Sv<99%), and others, and (2) the location groups applied by WHO. For the classification (1), they obtained OR=1.49 (95% CI : 0.36-6.23) from the highest group to the lowest, which was similar to the results of the classification (2). For the external comparison, Takahashi and his colleagues developed a cancer-progression model with several sensitivities under non-accident conditions, and showed 116 cases were possible to observe in Fukushima under non-accident conditions. Katanoda and his colleagues found an observed/expected ratio of 30.8 (95%CI: 26.2-35.9) of the prevalence of thyroid cancer among residents aged ≦ 20years (160.1 observed of cases and 50.2 expected cases), and a cumulative number of thyroid cancer deaths in Fukushima Prefecture of 0.6 under age 40 with the same method. This large disparity implied the possibility of over-diagnosis in thyroid examinations.
A researcher reported the results were unlikely to be explained by a screening effect, which implied the association between thyroid cancer cases and external radiation exposure. However, subsequently, a possibility that it might be a result of over-diagnosis of the thyroid examinations was pointed. And, no significant associations were found by applying objective classification of districts and by raising comparability with the incidence data of whole Japan, respectively. In the Basic Survey of FHMS, only individual external doses in the first four months after the accident has been observed. So neither external dose after the four months nor internal dose was applied in these studies. Further studies are necessary to clarify the existence of the association by applying the estimation of individual overall thyroid dose.
References (23)
[1] Fukushima Prefectural Governmental. The Basic Survey. http://fmu-global.jp/download/basic-survey-19/?wpdmdl=2585 (accessed 2018-02-01)
 
[2] Akahane K, Yonai S, Fukuda S, et al. NIRS external dose estimation system for Fukushima residents after the Fukushima Dai-ichi NPP accident. Sci Rep. 2013;3:1670. doi: 10.1038/srep01670.
 
[3] Thyroid Ultrasound Examination (Preliminary Baseline Screening). Supplemental Report of the FY 2016 Survey. http://fmu-global.jp/download/thyroid-ultrasound-examination-supplemental-report-of-the-fy-2016-surveypreliminary-baseline-screening/?wpdmdl=2690 (accessed 2018-02-01)
 
[4] Yasumura S, Hosoya M, Yamashita S. Study protocol for the Fukushima Health Management Survey. J Epidemiol. 2012;22(5):375-383.
 
[5] Shimura H, Sobue T, Takahashi H, et al. Findings of thyroid ultrasound examination within three years after the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant accident: The Fukushima Health Management Survey. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2017 Dec 14. doi: 10.1210/jc.2017-01603.
 
[6] Tsuda T, Tokinobu A, Yamamoto E, et al. Thyroid cancer detection by ultrasound among residents ages 18 years and younger in Fukushima, Japan: 2011 to 2014. Epidemiology. 2016;27(3): 316-322.
 
[7] Katanoda K, Kamo K, Tsugane S. Quantification of the increase in thyroid cancer prevalence in Fukushima after the nuclear disaster in 2011-a potential overdiagnosis? Jpn J Clin Oncol. 2016;46(3):284-286.
 
[8] Ohira, T, Takahashi H, Yasumura S, et al. Comparison of childhood thyroid cancer prevalence among 3 areas based on external radiation dose after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident. Medicine (Baltimore). 2016;95(35):e4472. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5008539/pdf/medi-95-e4472.pdf (accessed 2018-02-01)
 
[9] World Health Organization Health risk assessment from the nuclear accident after the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami based on a preliminary dose estimation. Geneva: WHO; 2013. p.38-43.
 
[10] Takahashi H, Takahashi K, Shimura H, et al. Simulation of expected childhood and adolescent thyroid cancer cases in Japan using a cancer-progression model based on the National Cancer Registry: Application to the first-round thyroid examination of the Fukushima Health Management Survey. Medicine (Baltimore). 2017;96(48):e8631. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5728738/pdf/medi-96-e8631.pdf (accessed 2018-02-01).
 
[11] Davis, S. Commentary: Screening for Thyroid cancer after the Fukushima Disaster: What do we learn from such an effort? Epidemiology. 2016;27(3):323-325.
 
[12] Jorgensen TJ. Re: Thyroid cancer among young people in Fukushima. Epidemiology. 2016; 27:e17.
 
[13] Korblein A. Re: Thyroid cancer among young people in Fukushima. Epidemiology. 2016; 27:e18-19.
 
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[15] Suzuki S. Re: Thyroid cancer among young people in Fukushima. Epidemiology. 2016;27:e19.
 
[16] Takahashi H, Ohira T, Yasumura S, et al. Re: Thyroid cancer among young people in Fukushima. Epidemiology. 2016;27:e21.
 
[17[ Takamura N. Re: Thyroid cancer among young people in Fukushima. Epidemiology. 2016;27:e18.
 
[18] Wakeford R, Auvinen A, Gent RN, et al. Re: Thyroid cancer among young people in Fukushima. Epidemiology. 2016;27:e20-21.
 
[19] Ochi S, Kato S, Tsubokura M, et al. Voice from Fukushima: responsibility of epidemiologists to avoid irrational stigmatisation on children in Fukushima. Thyroid. 2016;26:1332-1333.
 
[20] Rothman KJ, Greenland S, Lash TL. Modern Epidemiology. 3rd ed. Philadelphia; Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2008. p.47-48.
 
[21] Heidenreich WF, Kenigsberg J, Jacob P, et al. Time trends of thyroid cancer incidence in Belarus after the Chernobyl accident. Radiat Res. 1999;151:617-625.
 
[22] Jacob P, Bogdanova TI, Buglova E, et al. Thyroid cancer risk in areas of Ukraine and Belarus affected by the Chernobyl accident. Radiat Res. 2006;165:1-8.
 
[23] Ahn HS, Kim HJ, Welch HG. Korea’s thyroid-cancer “epidemic”-screening and overdiagnosis. N Engl J Med. 2014;371:1765-1767.
 
 

December 7, 2018 Posted by | Fukushima 2018 | , | Leave a comment

Fukushima teens thyroid cancers from overdiagnosis, ‘unlikely’ to be from radiation exposure!!!

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Results of mass screening of children, teens for thyroid cancer following Fukushima nuclear accident
November 29, 2018
Bottom Line: The accident at Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station in 2011 raised grave concerns about radioactive material released into the environment, including concerns over radiation-induced thyroid cancer. Ultrasound screenings for thyroid cancer were subsequently conducted in the Fukushima Health Management Survey. This observational study group includes about 324,000 people 18 or younger at the time of the accident and it reports on two rounds of ultrasound screening during the first five years after the accident. Thyroid cancer or suspected cancer was identified in 187 individuals within five years (116 people in the first round among nearly 300,000 people screened and 71 in the second round among 271,000 screened). The overwhelmingly common diagnosis in surgical cases was papillary thyroid cancer (149 of 152 or 98 percent).
 
US screening data from Fukushima shed light on thyroid cancer in kids
November 29, 2018 — The latest results of mass ultrasound screening of children for thyroid cancer after the Fukushima disaster were published online on November 29 by JAMA Otolaryngology — Head & Neck Surgery. The study provides vital data on thyroid cancer and may lead to growing demands outside of Japan for more ultrasound scans in younger people, increasing the risk of overdiagnosis, experts have warned.
In an observational study, Dr. Akira Ohtsuru, PhD, from the department of radiation health management at Fukushima Medical University, and colleagues analyzed the incidence of thyroid cancer in children and adolescents screened with two rounds of ultrasound within five years of the 2011 disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station. The main question they addressed was, what is the pattern by age group of cancer detection via ultrasound screening of the thyroid among children and young adults?
The first round of ultrasound screening was carried out between 2011 and 2013, and the second round between 2014 and 2015. A total of 324,301 individuals younger than 18 years at the time of the disaster were included in the analysis.
Thyroid cancer, or suspected cancer, was identified in 187 patients within five years (116 people in the first round among nearly 300,000 people screened and 71 in the second round among 271,000 screened). By far the most common diagnosis in surgical cases was papillary thyroid cancer (149 of 152, or 98%). Overall, the distribution pattern of the incidence rate by age group in second-round examinations increased with age, according to Ohtsuru and colleagues.
Looming risk of overdiagnosis
Large-scale ultrasound screening can identify many detectable cancers from a sizable pool of nonclinical and subclinical thyroid cancers among individuals of a relatively young age, in an age-dependent manner. However, to avoid overdiagnosis, an improvement in screening strategy based on the understanding of the natural history of thyroid cancer will be urgently needed, Ohtsuru and colleagues explained.
“The fundamental ethical principle of doing more good than harm should be central to accident management, including conducting thyroid screening that is designed to avoid the problems of potential overdiagnosis,” the researchers wrote. “We should not be influenced by the negative experiences or psychosocial issues of the examinees under the potential for overdiagnosis.”
Because the natural progression of thyroid cancer in young patients remains unknown, further studies are required, they believe. Data from the Fukushima Health Management Survey may contribute to understanding how to conduct future screening programs to both limit overdiagnosis and support an accurate evaluation of the effect of low-dose radiation on the thyroid glands of children and adolescents, they stated.
The 2011 disaster raised grave concerns about radioactive material released into the environment, including over radiation-induced thyroid cancer. Ultrasound screenings for thyroid cancer were subsequently conducted in the Fukushima Health Management Survey. The debate over whether a rise in thyroid cancer among children in Japan is related to the nuclear disaster — or whether it’s simply due to overdiagnosis as children near the site of the disaster are screened for the disease — has been ongoing since 2015.
Reaction to latest results
In a linked commentary also published in JAMA Otolaryngology — Head & Neck Surgery, U.S. experts welcomed the research.
“Before the Fukushima Survey, we did not know if there was a substantial reservoir of subclinical thyroid cancer in children and adolescents. These data show that there is a very large reservoir,” wrote Dr. Andrew J. Bauer, from the Pediatric Thyroid Center at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, and Dr. Louise Davies, from the VA Outcomes Group at the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center in White River Junction, VT.
More children and adolescents are likely to undergo ultrasound of the thyroid in the U.S., leading to the detection of a substantial reservoir of subclinical thyroid cancer. This could open up children to the risks and consequences of overdiagnosis and subsequent treatment that may worsen health, as has happened within a segment of the adult population, Bauer and Davies continued.
“We are still left with the difficult question of how to apply the concepts of overdiagnosis in this scenario. Pediatric thyroid cancer has a 98% rate of survival, even for patients with pulmonary metastasis, so benefits of treatment should not be considered in regard to effects on disease-specific mortality,” they pointed out.
Ohtsuru gave a lecture on this topic at the 5th International Expert Symposium in Fukushima on Radiation and Health, entitled “Chernobyl+30, Fukushima+5: Lessons and Solutions for Fukushima’s Thyroid Question.” His full presentation can be downloaded here.
 
Association between screening-detected thyroid cancers, radiation exposure ‘unlikely’ in Fukushima children
November 29, 2018
Many thyroid cancers detected by ultrasound screening in Japanese children in the 5 years after the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident mirror many low-risk, sporadic cases of adult thyroid cancer and are most likely not associated with radiation exposure, according to findings published in JAMA Otolaryngology Head & Neck Surgery.
“Large-scale mass screening of young people using ultrasonography resulted in the diagnosis of a number of thyroid cancers, including potential overdiagnosis cases,” Akira Ohtsuru, MD, PhD, professor in the department of radiation health management at Fukushima Medical University, Japan, told Endocrine Today. “These findings indicate that ultrasonography screening can identify many detectable cancers from large pool of nonclinical and subclinical thyroid cancers among individuals of a relatively young age, in an age-dependent manner.”
The level of radiation exposure in Fukushima immediately after the great earthquake in eastern Japan on March 11, 2011, has been deemed to be much lower than the levels reported in Chernobyl immediately after the 1986 nuclear power station accident, Ohtsuru and colleagues wrote in the study background. However, the researchers noted that there was a divergence in estimations of the thyroid equivalent dose of radiation during the early phase after the accident, as there was little direct measurement of the individuals, whereas radiation-induced thyroid cancers have been rated as causing some of the greatest concern after the accident.
“Thus, health surveillance, including thyroid screening, has been thought to be necessary for both scientific and social reasons,” the researchers wrote.
In an observational study, Ohtsuru and colleagues analyzed data from 324,301 Fukushima residents aged 18 years or younger at the time of the nuclear accident. Researchers assessed the number of detected cases of thyroid cancer during first (fiscal years 2011-2013) and second (fiscal years 2014-2015) rounds of screening, with age groups stratified by 3-year intervals. Researchers compared results against an age-specific incidence of unscreened cancers form a national cancer registry.
Researchers found that, among 299,905 participants screened in the first round (50.5% boys and men; mean age at screening, 15 years), 116 were diagnosed with malignant or suspected thyroid cancer. Among 271,083 participants screened in the second round, (50.4% boys and men; mean age at screening, 13 years), 71 were diagnosed with malignant or suspected thyroid cancer, according to researchers. In both the first- and second-round examinations, mean age at diagnosis was 17 years; however, mean tumor diameter was larger in the first- vs. the second-round screenings (mean, 12.7 mm vs. 9.7).
Papillary thyroid cancer was the most common pathologic diagnosis, they wrote, at 149 of 152 cases (98%). The researchers also noted that the distribution pattern by age group at the time of the accident increased with older age in both screening rounds, with an interval between screenings of about 2.1 years. The number of detected thyroid cancer cases per 100,000 persons was estimated to be approximately 175 for those aged 18 years at the time of the accident in the first round of screening and 97 for those aged 18 years at the time of the accident during the second round of screening.
Researchers calculated that the estimated age-conditional incidence rate of cases per 100,000 person-years was 0.5 for those aged 15 to 17 years, 1 for those aged 18 to 20 years and 1.7 for those aged 21 to 22 years.
“Although a longer observation period is needed, this pattern by age at the time of the accident differs from that of the Chernobyl nuclear power station accident; for example, there was a higher frequency of cases of cancer at younger ages with a relatively short latent period after the Chernobyl nuclear power station accident,” the researchers wrote. “Thus, an association between the large number of thyroid cancers detected and radiation exposure is thought to be very unlikely, in addition to the very low doses of radiation in the Fukushima nuclear power station accident.”
Ohtsuru added that, to ensure the merit of early detection and prevent overdiagnosis via large-scale screening, development of a careful monitoring system is urgently needed based on the understanding of the natural history of thyroid cancer.
In commentary accompanying the study, Andrew J. Bauer, MD, medical director of the Pediatric Thyroid Center at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, and Louise Davies, MD, MS, research fellowship director of the VA Outcomes Group at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in White River Junction, Vermont, wrote that researchers should not assume that every asymptomatically discovered case of pediatric thyroid cancer is a “triumph of early detection.”
“Going forward, research to better define which pediatric thyroid cancers are likely to progress, and a better understanding of the trajectory of the natural history of thyroid cancers detected in early life, is urgently needed,” Bauer and Davies wrote. “The extremely high prevalence of subclinical thyroid cancer shown by the Fukushima Survey, including many with lymph node metastases, suggests that we have much to learn about the natural history of lymph node metastases, but that we should not assume that every asymptomatically identified case of pediatric thyroid cancer is an instance of overdiagnosis.” – by Regina Schaffer
For more information:
Akira Ohtsuru, MD, PhD, can be reached at Fukushima Medical University, Department of Radiation Health Management, 1 Hikarigaoka, Fukushima 960-1295, Japan; email: ohtsuru@fmu.ac.jp.
Disclosures: One of the authors reports he received grants from commercial sponsor JCR Pharmaceuticals Co. Bauer and Davies report receiving travel funds from the International Agency for Research on Cancer.

December 7, 2018 Posted by | Fukushima 2018 | , | Leave a comment

5 more minors in Fukushima Pref. at time of nuclear accident diagnosed with thyroid cancer

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FUKUSHIMA — Five more people in Fukushima Prefecture who were 18 and under at the time of the 2011 nuclear accident were diagnosed with thyroid cancer as of the end of September this year, a prefectural investigative commission announced at a Dec. 25 meeting.
Fukushima Prefecture established the commission to examine the health of residents after the March 2011 triple meltdown at the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant. A total of 159 Fukushima prefectural residents who were aged 18 and under when the meltdowns occurred have now been diagnosed with thyroid cancer.
The commission stated on Dec. 25 that “it is difficult to think the cases are related to radiation exposure” from the disaster.

December 27, 2017 Posted by | Fukushima 2017 | , | Leave a comment