nuclear-news

The News That Matters about the Nuclear Industry Fukushima Chernobyl Mayak Three Mile Island Atomic Testing Radiation Isotope

TEPCO: Frozen soil wall effect limited

 

2018/03/01
Tokyo Electric Power Company, or TEPCO, says an underground frozen soil wall around its Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant has had a limited effect in reducing groundwater contamination.
 
The 1.5-kilometer-long barrier is designed to keep groundwater from flowing into reactor buildings that were damaged by the March 2011 earthquake, tsunami and nuclear meltdowns.
 
The wall was expected to be the main defense against groundwater contamination, as about 500 tons of water was being tainted daily by radioactive substances.
 
TEPCO officials on Thursday estimated the amount of new contaminated water to have decreased by about 95 tons a day from before the wall was built.
They said the estimate is based on 3 months of data including that from before and after the wall was almost completed last November.
 
TEPCO had introduced a so-called sub-drain system for pumping up water from wells dug around the buildings.
 
The officials estimated that the 2 measures resulted in a decrease of 380 tons of tainted groundwater a day, suggesting the wall’s effectiveness is limited and lower than that of the drain method.
 
The government plans to ask experts to look into whether the utility’s estimate is accurate.
 
Public funds worth over 300 million dollars have been used to build the wall. Its annual operating cost exceeds ten million dollars.
icewall march 1 2018.jpg

March 1, 2018 Posted by | Fukushima 2018 | , , , | Leave a comment

Thyroid cancer relapses in some Fukushima children

The 3.11 Fund for Children with Thyroid Cancer made the appeal at a news conference that a survey conducted by the fund shows that cancer returned to 9.5 percent, or 8, of 84 children diagnosed with thyroid cancer after the accident. They had to undergo second operations as a result.

 

 

2018/03/01
 
A private fund offering financial assistance to young people diagnosed with thyroid cancer after the 2011 Fukushima nuclear accident has called for a detailed follow-up survey of those who have relapsed.
 
The 3.11 Fund for Children with Thyroid Cancer made the appeal at a news conference in Tokyo on Thursday.
 
The fund’s name refers to March 11th, 2011, when a tsunami triggered by a powerful earthquake crippled a nuclear power plant in Fukushima Prefecture.
 
A survey conducted by the fund shows that cancer returned to 9.5 percent, or 8, of 84 children diagnosed with thyroid cancer after the accident. They had to undergo second operations as a result.
 
The fund says the 8 people were 6 to 15 years old at the time of the accident 7 years ago. Their cancers returned about 28 months on average after their first surgeries. One relapse occurred just a year later.
 
Fukushima Prefecture has been offering thyroid cancer screening for local residents who were 18 or younger at the time of the accident.
 
The 3.11 Fund pointed out that an expert committee advising the prefectural government has not taken up the issue of relapses among young thyroid cancer patients.
 
Fund director Hisako Sakiyama said that to get a clear picture of the health effects of the nuclear accident, it’s important to continue screening with particular attention on relapses.
Thyroid cancer relapses March 1 2018.jpg

March 1, 2018 Posted by | Fukushima 2018 | , , | Leave a comment

Fukushima flounder exported for first time since nuclear disaster

March 1, 2018
Flounder export March 1, 2018.jpg
A worker hefts a flounder into a box for export to Thailand in Soma, Fukushima Prefecture, on Feb. 28, 2018.
 
SOMA, Fukushima — Known as the pride of the Joban region along the Pacific coast, flounder caught off Fukushima Prefecture were exported on Feb. 28 for the first time since the nuclear disaster seven years ago.
The shipment will make its way to Bangkok, where it will supply Japanese restaurants in the Thai capital with close to 1 ton of flounder by the end of March. On Feb. 28, the roughly 100 kilograms of ocean-caught fish were stacked into ice-filled cases at the market in Soma, Fukushima Prefecture. Each flounder weighed between 1.5 to 2 kilograms, and Soma Futaba fisheries cooperative head Kanji Tachiya, 66, said, “While the number of fish caught along the coast is still few, the fact that Fukushima fish will be tasted abroad motivates us.”
The flounder along Fukushima’s coastline have thick white flesh and excellent flavor, even fetching high prices at Tokyo’s famous Tsukiji wholesale market. Restrictions on their export were lifted in 2016, and while business will continue on a trial basis, the flounder still cost 10 to 20 percent less than those caught in other regions.
The Fukushima Prefectural Government negotiated with a trading company in Thailand that did not impose import restrictions on marine products from the region following the nuclear disaster. Levels of radioactive cesium in all of the roughly 25,000 types of marine products caught off the Fukushima coast surveyed by the prefecture have fallen below the domestic standard of 100 becquerels per kilogram since April 2015, and the aim is to increase the amount, type and destinations for exported fish in the future.

March 1, 2018 Posted by | Fukushima 2018 | , , | Leave a comment

Radiation levels in Fukushima zones higher in 2017 than 2016, and still above government target despite cleanup: Greenpeace Japan

Look how the Japanese media are routinely censoring the news about the Fukushima situation.
In the first article  about the Greenpeace recent report, a short article published in Australia, are clearly stated:
1. Fukushima still has radiation 100 times higher than normal.
2. Greenpeace warned all areas surveyed, including those where people have been allowed to return, had levels of radiation similar to an active nuclear facility “requiring strict controls”, despite the fact that residents had lifted restrictions on access after years of decontamination efforts.
3. “This is public land. Citizens, including children and pregnant women returning to their contaminated homes, are at risk of receiving radiation doses equivalent to one chest X-ray every week.
4. This is unacceptable and a clear violation of their human rights,” Jan Vande Putte with Greenpeace Belgium, and leader of the survey, said.
In the second article about the Greenpeace recent report, a longer article published by the Japan Times in Japan, all those clearly stated 4 points have now disappeared, vanished, having been censored and left out, or spinned down, reduced, minimized such as:
1. “radiation 100 times higher than normal” becomes ” radiation levels higher than the government-set target of 0.23 microsieverts per hour, ranging from 0.2 to 0.8 microsieverts per hour” , meaning 4 times higher than the Japanese government-set target.
This is a typical example that shows you how the Japanese media, unfree from the Japanese government heavy censorship, have been for the past 7 years lying, hiding the true facts of the ongoing yet unsettled nuclear disaster in Fukushima, to the majority of the Japanese population.
n-radiation-a-20180302-870x580.jpg
A member of Greenpeace checks radiation levels in the village of Iitate in Fukushima Prefecture last October. | GREENPEACE / VIA KYODO
March 1, 2018
Fukushima radiation still high: Greenpeace
A new report by Greenpeace says Fukushima, the sight of 2011’s nuclear accident after an earthquake, still has radiation 100 times higher than normal.
Greenpeace says towns in Japan’s Fukushima prefecture, close to the disaster-hit Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, are exposed to excessive levels of radiation.
In a report published on Thursday, Greenpeace warned all areas surveyed, including those where people have been allowed to return, had levels of radiation similar to an active nuclear facility “requiring strict controls”, despite the fact that residents had lifted restrictions on access after years of decontamination efforts.
“This is public land. Citizens, including children and pregnant women returning to their contaminated homes, are at risk of receiving radiation doses equivalent to one chest X-ray every week. This is unacceptable and a clear violation of their human rights,” Jan Vande Putte with Greenpeace Belgium, and leader of the survey, said.
Japanese authorities have said these areas are progressively returning to normality after the massive 9.1-magnitude earthquake and resulting tsunami which struck on March 11, 2011, triggering the nuclear disaster at Fukushima.
The survey said that in the towns of Namie and Iitate, located between 10 and 40 kilometres from the Fukushima Daiichi plant and where evacuation orders were partially lifted in March 2017, radiation levels continue to be “up to 100 times higher than the international limit for public exposure”.
Greenpeace also noted the “ineffectiveness of decontamination work” in these areas, saying there remained a “significant risk to health and safety for any returning evacuee”, adding that Tokyo’s policy of “effectively forcing people to return by ending housing and other financial support is not working”.
The Japanese government had said radiation levels in the reopened zones posed no risk to human health, noting that its data was corroborated by the country’s medical experts and organisations such as the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation.
Considered the worst nuclear disaster since the 1986 Chernobyl disaster in Ukraine, the accident at Fukushima displaced tens of thousands of people, caused serious damage to the local economy.
Radiation levels in Fukushima zones higher in 2017 than 2016, and still above government target despite cleanup: Greenpeace Japan
Following the 2011 nuclear crisis, radiation levels at houses and areas nearby in a Fukushima village remain around three times higher than the government target despite cleanup work having been performed, an environmental group has said.
In some areas of the village of Iitate and the town of Namie, levels of radioactivity detected at some points among tens of thousands checked in surveys last September and October were higher than they had been the previous year, Greenpeace Japan said in a report released Thursday.
Most of the six houses surveyed in Iitate, located around 40 kilometers northwest of the crippled Fukushima No. 1 complex, logged radiation levels higher than the government-set target of 0.23 microsieverts per hour, ranging from 0.2 to 0.8 microsieverts per hour.
Some areas in the village had seen radiation levels rise from 2016, Greenpeace said. “There is a possibility (the environment) was contaminated again as radioactive materials that had accumulated in nearby forests may have moved around,” it said.
One house, located near a municipal office with slightly wooded areas nearby, marked lower radiation levels compared with the previous 2016 survey but levels at another five houses — which are near forests that have yet to be cleaned up — have remained almost the same.
The points surveyed covered areas in Iitate and Namie where evacuation orders have been lifted as well as some parts of Namie that remain designated as “difficult to return” zones following the Fukushima nuclear disaster, which was triggered by the massive March 2011 earthquake and tsunami.
The survey also showed that the effects of cleanup work conducted in 2011 and 2012 in the Tsushima district of Namie, located 40 km northwest of the Fukushima plant, had been limited, with one house there logging radiation levels of 5.8 microsieverts per hour at the highest readings and 1.3 microsieverts per hour on average.
The district is among areas designated as special reconstruction zones by the government. The state plans to carry out cleanup work and promote infrastructure development intensively at its expense to make such areas livable again.

March 1, 2018 Posted by | Fukushima 2018 | , , , , , , | 1 Comment

原発事故の写像 2018年3月最新放射線調査 Reflections of Fukushima

Screenshot from 2018-03-01 15:03:51

Published on 28 Feb 2018 国際環境NGOグリーンピース ジャパン

 

March 1, 2018 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Going home after 7 years of the accident – Story of Ms. Kanno – 事故7年目の我が家へ 福島県浪江町 – 菅野さんのストーリー

Screenshot from 2018-03-01 14:59:33

Published on 28 Feb 2018  国際環境NGOグリーンピース ジャパン

March 1, 2018 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Greenpeace investigation shows Fukushima radiation risks to last into next century

プレスリリース – 2018-03-01

Tokyo, 1 March 2018 – A comprehensive survey by Greenpeace Japan in the towns of Iitate and Namie in Fukushima prefecture, including the exclusion zone, revealed radiation levels up to 100 times higher than the international limit for public exposure.[1][2] The high radiation levels in these areas pose a significant risk to returning evacuees until at least the 2050’s and well into next century.

The findings come just two weeks ahead of a critical decision at the United Nations Human Rights Council (UNHRC) review on Japan’s human rights record and commitments to evacuees from the nuclear disaster.

“In all of the areas we surveyed, including where people are permitted to live, the radiation levels are such that if it was in a nuclear facility it would require strict controls. Yet this is public land. Citizens, including children and pregnant women returning to their contaminated homes, are at risk of receiving radiation doses equivalent to one chest X-ray every week. This is unacceptable and a clear violation of their human rights, ” said Jan Vande Putte, radiation specialist with Greenpeace Belgium and leader of the survey project.

Greenpeace Japan conducted the investigations in September and October last year, measuring tens of thousands of data points around homes, forests, roads and farmland in the open areas of Namie and Iitate, as well as inside the closed Namie exclusion zone. The government plans to open up small areas of the exclusion zone, including Obori and Tsushima, for human habitation in 2023. The survey shows the decontamination program to be ineffective, combined with a region that is 70-80% mountainous forest which cannot be decontaminated.

Key finding from the Greenpeace Japan survey:

  • Even after decontamination, in four of six houses in Iitate, the average radiation levels were three times higher than the government long term target. Some areas showed an increase from the previous year, which could have come from recontamination.

  • At a house in Tsushima in the Namie exclusion zone, despite it being used as a test bed for decontamination in 2011-12, a dose of 7 mSv per year is estimated, while the international limit for public exposure in a non-accidental situation is 1 mSv/y. This reveals the ineffectiveness of decontamination work.

  • At a school in Namie town, where the evacuation order was lifted, decontamination had failed to significantly reduce radiation risks, with levels in a nearby forest with an average dose rate of more than 10 mSv per year. Children are particularly at risk from radiation exposure.

  • In one zone in Obori, the maximum radiation measured at 1m would give the equivalent of 101 mSv per year or one hundred times the recommended maximum annual limit, assuming a person would stay there for a full year These high levels are a clear threat, in the first instance, to thousands of decontamination workers who will spend many hours in that area.

This contamination presents a long term risk, and means that the government’s long-term radiation target (1mSv/year which is equivalent to 0.23μSv/hour) are unlikely to be reached before at least the middle of the century in many areas that are currently open and into next century for the exclusion zone of Namie. In an admission of failure, the government has recently initiated a review of its radiation target levels with the aim of raising it even higher.

The Government’s policy to effectively force people to return by ending housing and other financial support is not working, with population return rates of 2.5% and 7% in Namie and Iitate respectively as of December 2017.

In November last year, the UNHRC’s Universal Periodic Review (UPR) on Japan issued four recommendations on Fukushima issues. Member governments (Austria, Portugal, Mexico and Germany) called for Japan to respect the human rights of Fukushima evacuees and adopt strong measures to reduce the radiation risks to citizens, in particular women and children and to fully support self evacuees. Germany called on Japan to return to maximum permissible radiation of 1 mSv per year, while the current government policy in Japan is to permit up to 20 mSv per year. If this recommendation was applied, the Japanese government’s lifting of evacuation orders would have be halted.

“Our radiation survey results provides evidence that there is a significant risk to health and safety for any returning evacuee. The Japanese government must stop forcing people to go back home and protect their rights,” said Kazue Suzuki, Energy Campaigner at Greenpeace Japan. “It is essential that the government fully accept and immediately apply the recommendations at the United Nations.”

Notes:
[1] Reflections in Fukushima: The Fukushima Daiichi Accident Seven Years On

[2] The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) sets a maximum dose of 1 mSv/ year in normal situations for the public, and in the range of 1-20 mSv/y under post-nuclear accident situations, such as that resulting from Fukushima Daiichi. The ICRP recommends that governments select the lower part of the 1–20 mSv/year range for protection of people living in contaminated areas, and “to reduce all individual exposures associated with the event to as low as reasonably achievable.”

Link to Photos and Videos

Contacts:
Chisato Jono, Communications Officer, Greenpeace Japan, email: chisato.jono@greenpeace.org, mob: +81 (0) 80-6558-4446

Jan Vande Putte, Greenpeace Belgium, Radiation Protection Advisor, Fukushima radiation research leader, email: jputte@greenpeace.org, mob: 81-(0)80-8912-7202

Kazue Suzuki, Energy Campaigner, Greenpeace Japan, email: suzuki.kazue@greenpeace.org, mob: +81- (0)80-3017-0046

Greenpeace International Press Desk, pressdesk.int@greenpeace.org, phone: +31 (0) 20 718 2470 (available 24 hours)

Source; http://www.greenpeace.org/japan/ja/news/press/2018/pr201803011/

March 1, 2018 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

The truth concerning nuclear accident induced thyroid cancers. Japan TVreport

In Japan we see the nuclear industry fight back concerning claims of thyroid cancers using all the tools in their armories. Meanwhile, dedicated health professionals, activist groups and even a Nobel prize winner Professor Masukawa has challenged the Japanese Governments version of events and consequences.

nuclear-news

Article by Shaun McGee (aka arclight2011)

Article posted to nuclear-news.net

Article posted 2 November 2017

In a recent Japanese television publication (Our Planet TV), a presentation of the effects in Chernobyl was made in Japanese and Belorussian with an English Power Point presentation. The presentation was from Victor Kondradovich from the Minsk Municipal Onocological Centre in Belarus.

The findings of this presentation shows the manipulation of the nuclear industry when it comes to reporting health issues after nuclear accidents. As many nuclear reactor and processing countries are trying to ease the allowable amounts of radioactivity we are allowed whilst playing down reported health effects.

In Japan we see the nuclear industry fight back concerning claims of thyroid cancers using all the tools in their armories. Meanwhile, dedicated health professionals, activist groups and even a Nobel prize winner Professor Masukawa  has challenged the Japanese Governments version of events and…

View original post 194 more words

March 1, 2018 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

An Taisce Ireland Welcomes Public Consultation UK Hinkley Point C, Nuclear Power Plant

“…..The estimates for compensation seem entirely unrealistic in the context of the costs incurred in Fukishima, and even then there is a significant shortfall to be met by a UK Government who will be struggling in the aftermath of a serious Nuclear event…..”
Screenshot from 2018-02-03 14:55:08
20th February 2018
Press Release

The Government has today launched public consultations on the UK’s Hinkley Point C, nuclear power station, 5 years after it should have under UN Conventions. The UK Government are building a nuclear power station, Hinkley Point C, on the north coast of Somerset, some 150 miles (~242 km) from Ireland’s East Coast.

Charles Stanley-Smith, An Taisce’s Communication Officer stated “These consultations have been hard won through court cases and escalation to the compliance committees of two UNECE conventions on consultation rights and obligations. This is the hard work of An Taisce, The Environmental Pillar and Friends of the Irish Environment and German MEP Ms Sylivia Kotting-Uhl”

He continued “The peoples’ rights to these consultations will become increasingly important in our ability to address transboundary impacts of UK projects on our environment, health and economy, into the future. Under UN Conventions, the peoples of neighbouring countries that could be affected by a project need to be consulted. Post Brexit, we may not be able to rely on EU law to safeguard us, but these are UN conventions For instance, the Irish people will now need to be consulted in terms of any other 5 proposed nuclear power station on the UK’s west coast”

Charles Stanley-Smith continued “An Taisce welcomes this Consultation and we would like like to encourage people to participate, in this consultation which is being organised through the Local Authorities across the country. The deadline for your submissions is 17th April 2018”

An Taisce challenged the planning permission and lack of transboundary consultation in the UK Courts [Note 1]. Then along with The Environmental Pillar and Friends of the Irish Environment, they continued their challenge through the compliance mechanisms of the relevant international conventions governing consultation on transboundary impacts. The committees responsible for compliance with the conventions have been robust in upholding the interests of the public.

Following the recommendations of one of these committees, a further round of consultation by the UK on Hinkley Point C happened between July and October last year. In those cases Germany, Denmark and the Netherlands facilitated their public being consulted. Irish eNGOs escalated their concern about the further failure by Ireland to provide for consultation during that period with the Irish public. This resulted in the committee writing to the Irish Government and invited Ireland to uphold the rights of the Irish public to be consulted. This is now finally happening in this extended round of consultation, commencing on Feb 20th, 2018. [Note 2]

We suggest some considerations the public could make in their submission:

  • The discounted economic loss to Ireland of an accident in a plant like Hinkley Point C being ‘conservatively’ estimated by the ESRI in a 2016 report [Note 3] as €161 billion ( scenario 4) ;
  • The serious deficits in the climatic modelling which the UK used in the UK’s assessment of the potential transboundary impacts in the event of an accident; [Note 4]
  • The lack of emergency response planning in Ireland to deal with such an incident to protect the public; The Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland, (RPII) in its 2013 report [Note 5] on the Radiological impacts of the proposed UK plants in Ireland, produced after the UK granted permission assumed the impacts to Irish people can be mitigated against by sheltering indoors, but fail to address basic considerations and practicalities of the feasibility of such mitigation given issues like the contamination of our largely uncovered water supply.
  • The effect on Ireland’s agriculture could be devastating. If an event was to occur in April for example when all the winter fodder is exhausted, new silage can’t be made, and animals would need to be kept inside without food or water. The extent of Insurance coverage in place in the event of an accident is also controversial. The estimates for compensation seem entirely unrealistic in the context of the costs incurred in Fukishima, and even then there is a significant shortfall to be met by a UK Government who will be struggling in the aftermath of a serious Nuclear event.
  • There are additional risks now consequent on Brexit. Currently we can rely on the controls associated with a number of EU Directives, and key EU principles regarding the polluter pays and the precautionary principal which underpin these directives set out in the EU treaties. Amendments are being drafted for the House of Lords debate on the Great Withdrawl Bill may or may not serve to adequately address these principals in the post-Brexit UK legislative codes. The extent of parliamentary oversight to changes in UK legislation post Brexit has already been acknowledged to be a hugely controversial issue, given the extent of powers being granted to amend legislation by regulation in the bill.
  • Also as part of Brexit the UK proposes to withdraw from the EURATOM treaty, which is concerned with a number of matters including Nuclear Waste and safety. The implications of this are entirely unclear.
  • Serious technical issues have become apparent with the design for the reactor pressure vessel proposed for use in Hinkley which have become apparent in Flamanville in France.

ENDS

For further information, contact:
Charles Stanley-Smith, Communications, An Taisce. Tel: +353 87 241 1995
email: publicaffairs@antaisce.org
An Taisce The National Trust for Ireland
www.antaisce.org

Notes

[1] History of Court Cases

  • Development Consent Order for Hinkley Point C was granted on 19th March 2013.
  • An Taisce on learning of the Secretary of State’s decision, mounted a Judicial Review challenge against the decision in the court of England and Wales, taking the matter all the way to the Supreme Court who ultimately ruled against.
  • An Taisce has sought a reference to the EU Court of Justice, (CJEU), to clarify the proper interpretation of Article 7 of the EU Environmental Impact Assessment Directive, (2011/92/EU) regarding the test for transboundary impacts, in light of the two UNECE Conventions which underpinned this article.
  • The UK Supreme Court refused the appeal on paper stating that the CJEU had already ruled on the matter.
  • Subsequently Friends of the Irish Environment, (FIE), supported by An Taisce made a complaint to the implementation committee of one of these conventions The UNECE Convention on Environmental Impact Assessment in a Transboundary Context” (the Espoo Convention),and also by a German Member of Parliament, Ms Sylivia Kotting-Uhl, and other complaints were also made to the Compliance Committee of the UNECE
  • These committees ultimately found the UK to be non-compliant with its consultation obligations in respect of Hinkley Point C.

[2] Details of Consultation Notice in Irish Times 20/02/2018 https://drive.google.com/file/d/1WthkQa7RIEtMNkzFPN9l4dwDEz3aH4yR/view?usp=sharing

[3] ESRI in a 2016 reporthttps://www.esri.ie/pubs/BKMNEXT313.pdf#page=5

[4] Professor John Sweeney’s Assessment

Professor John Sweeney assessed the assessment and reports the UK prepared under Article 37 of the EURATOM treaty and which the UK relied up on in determining its view on the potential for transboundary impacts from HInkley Point C in the event of an accident. Below he has provided a brief summary of his technical report, with a very stark and strong conclusion regarding the confidence on the competence of key elements of the Article 37 submission.

“Summary of Hinkley Concerns

  1. The risk of extreme meteorological events coinciding with an accident occurring at Hinkley are calculated on an unsound basis. The weather database used to estimate e.g. an event which might occur e.g. once in 10,000 years cannot be calculated with any confidence from the short run of data used by the Hinkley proposers. The statistical basis for this is further undermined by the fact that climate changes are currently underway in both the UK and Ireland which render reliance on a short historical climate database unsound.
  2. Similar concerns arise when calculating water levels at this coastal site. Existing tide gauges indicate sea level is rising all along the south coast of England. Current estimates are that sea level will continue to rise into the 22nd Century at least, with ultimate rises of several metres likely. The effect of this requires to be incorporated in any extreme water level calculation and certainly making estimates for the 1:10,000 year event is not statistically valid.
  3. Uncertainty exist as regards future storm surge changes. Combined with sea level rise this poses additional risks which are not handled using the precautionary principle by the Hinkley proposers. Water level considerations are crucial since spent fuel is to be stored for over a century at this coastal site.
  4. The dispersion model used dates from 1981 and several caveats to its use have been made by its original author. These caveats are particularly relevant to the site and situation of Hinkley Point and do not appear to have been considered adequately in the report.
  5. Any dispersion model based on progressive dilution downwind does not adequately consider meteorological conditions conducive to long range transport of a pollution plume in an undispersed state. Chernobyl exemplified this, resulting in serious implications for Irish upland farming. The worst case outcomes for Ireland are therefore not adequately considered in the dispersion modelling used.
  6. Ireland, unlike France and the Channel Islands, was excluded from any accident impact assessment. The Irish coast and the Channel Islands are equidistant from Hinkley and only slightly further than the nearest point on the French Coast. This raises issues of confidence about the extent to which the report can be considered competent. “

[5] RPII 2013 Reporthttp://www.epa.ie/pubs/reports/radiation/RPII_Proposed_Nuc_Power_Plants_UK_13.pdf

About An Taisce

An Taisce is a charity that works to preserve and protect Ireland’s natural and built heritage. We are an independent charitable voice for the environment and for heritage issues. We are not a government body, semi-state or agency. Founded in 1948, we are one of Ireland’s oldest and largest environmental organisations

http://www.antaisce.org/articles/an-taisce-welcomes-public-consultation-uk-hinkley-point-c-nuclear-power-plant

 

Further reading on UK based nuclear accidents damaging Ireland can be found here in a new Sellafield report – https://nuclear-news.net/2018/02/03/a-new-report-on-sellafield-highlights-the-likely-nuclear-damage-to-ireland-exclusive-to-nuclear-news-net/

March 1, 2018 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

New evidence of nuclear fuel releases found at Fukushima

February 28, 2018
Uranium and other radioactive materials, such as caesium and technetium, have been found in tiny particles released from the damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactors.
180228092241_1_900x600.jpg
“Our research strongly suggests there is a need for further detailed investigation on Fukushima fuel debris, inside, and potentially outside the nuclear exclusion zone,” said Dr Gareth Law.
 
Uranium and other radioactive materials, such as caesium and technetium, have been found in tiny particles released from the damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactors.
This could mean the environmental impact from the fallout may last much longer than previously expected according to a new study by a team of international researchers, including scientists from The University of Manchester.
The team says that, for the first time, the fallout of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactor fuel debris into the surrounding environment has been “explicitly revealed” by the study.
The scientists have been looking at extremely small pieces of debris, known as micro-particles, which were released into the environment during the initial disaster in 2011. The researchers discovered uranium from nuclear fuel embedded in or associated with caesium-rich micro particles that were emitted from the plant’s reactors during the meltdowns. The particles found measure just five micrometres or less; approximately 20 times smaller than the width of a human hair. The size of the particles means humans could inhale them.
The reactor debris fragments were found inside the nuclear exclusion zone, in paddy soils and at an abandoned aquaculture centre, located several kilometres from the nuclear plant.
It was previously thought that only volatile, gaseous radionuclides such as caesium and iodine were released from the damaged reactors. Now it is becoming clear that small, solid particles were also emitted, and that some of these particles contain very long-lived radionuclides; for example, uranium has a half-life of billions of years.
Dr Gareth Law, Senior Lecturer in Analytical Radiochemistry at the University of Manchester and an author on the paper, says: “Our research strongly suggests there is a need for further detailed investigation on Fukushima fuel debris, inside, and potentially outside the nuclear exclusion zone. Whilst it is extremely difficult to get samples from such an inhospitable environment, further work will enhance our understanding of the long-term behaviour of the fuel debris nano-particles and their impact.”
The Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) is currently responsible for the clean-up and decommissioning process at the Fukushima Daiichi site and in the surrounding exclusion zone. Dr Satoshi Utsunomiya, Associate Professor at Kyushu University (Japan) led the study.
He added: “Having better knowledge of the released microparticles is also vitally important as it provides much needed data on the status of the melted nuclear fuels in the damaged reactors. This will provide extremely useful information for TEPCO’s decommissioning strategy.”
At present, chemical data on the fuel debris located within the damaged nuclear reactors is impossible to get due to the high levels of radiation. The microparticles found by the international team of researchers will provide vital clues on the decommissioning challenges that lie ahead.
 
Story Source:
Materials provided by Manchester University. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.
 
Journal Reference:
1. Asumi Ochiai, Junpei Imoto, Mizuki Suetake, Tatsuki Komiya, Genki Furuki, Ryohei Ikehara, Shinya Yamasaki, Gareth T. W. Law, Toshihiko Ohnuki, Bernd Grambow, Rodney C. Ewing, Satoshi Utsunomiya. Uranium Dioxides and Debris Fragments Released to the Environment with Cesium-Rich Microparticles from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Environmental Science & Technology, 2018; DOI: 10.1021/acs.est.7b06309
 

 

March 1, 2018 Posted by | Fukushima 2018 | , , , | Leave a comment