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Fukushima: The ‘100 times normal’ radiation area outside exclusion zone – ‘Worrying!’

FUKUSHIMA investigators were left “worried” after recording radiation levels 100 times normal, leading them to suggest the exclusion zone should be increased.

 

 
 
Thu, Jul 4, 2019
 
The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster occurred after an accident at the nuclear power plant in Okuma, Japan and was the most significant nuclear incident since the devastating Chernobyl accident of 1986. The accident was started by a tsunami following the Tohoku earthquake on March 11, 2011, and while the active reactors automatically shut down, water flooded the emergency generators providing power to the coolers. The coolant loss led to three nuclear meltdowns, hydrogen-air explosions, and the release of radioactive material in units one, two and three between March 12 and 15.
 
A total of 154,000 people were evacuated from the area as a result and a 12-mile exclusion zone was put in place – later increased to 19 miles – with a roadblock being constantly guarded.
 
However, when Chernobyl researcher Yevgen visited as part of Amazon Prime’s “Radioactive Detectives” series, he was left shocked.
 
The narrator revealed in 2017: “Have the Japanese authorities determined the correct exclusion zone?
 
“The first big surprise is a completely unguarded borderline.
 
“Yevgen wants to carry out his first measurements here.
 
“He has to tell Kenzo that the radiation level exceeds the natural radiation 100 times over.
 
“The men are worried.”
 
Kenzo Hashimoto, a Japanese journalist claimed the exclusion zone needed to be increased as a result.
 
He said: “If the radiation is that high, the authorities should extend the border line even further.
 
“I don’t know exactly how the survey has been made – it seems very strange to me.
 
On July 5, 2012, the National Diet of Japan Fukushima Nuclear Accident Independent Investigation Commission (NAIIC) found that the causes of the accident had been foreseeable and that the plant operator, Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO), had failed to meet basic safety requirements such as risk assessment.
 
TEPCO admitted for the first time on October 12, 2012, that it had failed to take stronger measures to prevent disasters for fear of inviting lawsuits or protests against its nuclear plants.
 
There are no clear plans for decommissioning the plant, but an intensive cleanup programme is expected to take at least 30 years.
 
It comes after the shocking cost of a home inside Chernobyl’s exclusion zone was revealed during Amazon Prime’s “Chernobyl’s Cafe” series.
 
The 2016 documentary detailed: “In 1986, Chernobyl city had about 13,000 inhabitants and officially today there are none.
 
“Radioactivity in the city is near to normal.
 
“Homes were abandoned immediately after the disaster, people left everything.
 
“Some have returned and have put their homes back in order, they furnished them and they live there.
 
“In these neighbourhoods, life is modest and for a few hundred Euros, you can buy a small house with a garden and enjoy the tranquillity of a true country house.
 
“A small community exists and social life is slowly growing.”
 

July 16, 2019 - Posted by | fukushima 2019 | ,

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