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Nebraskans Are Building Solar Panels to Block the Keystone XL Pipeline

Mining Awareness +

From Greenpeace.org:
Nebraskans Are Building Solar Panels to Block the Keystone XL Pipeline
by Mike Hudema, August 15, 2017

“They’ll have to go under it, around it, or tear it down to get their dirty oil from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico.”

Environmentalists are sometimes criticized for not talking about solutions enough. The media often portrays people who oppose pipelines as ‘anti-development,’ for instance. The reality, however, is that we can both fight against dangerous pipelines and fight for solutions like renewable energy at the same time — and those fighting the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline just made that point more clear than ever.

Landowners and Indigenous groups are joining together to build solar projects directly in the path…

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August 24, 2017 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Hurricane as Rain Bomb — Rapidly Intensifying Harvey Threatens to Dump 20-32 Inches on Texas

robertscribbler

A hurricane moving over the much warmer than normal waters of the Northern Gulf of Mexico is expected to rapidly strengthen to major status with 115 mph or higher sustained winds over the next 36 hours before making landfall. Such rapid intensification brings with it the risk of severe storm surge flooding and damaging winds along the U.S. Gulf Coast. However, one of the most worrying features of this system is that it is incredibly moisture rich and new models now show a potential that the storm will dump as much as 20-32 inches of rain across parts of Texas as the storm stalls over the region for 5-6 days.

(Present model guidance for Hurricane Harvey’s rainfall totals show a significant…

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August 24, 2017 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

August 24 Energy News

geoharvey

Opinion:

¶ “Exxon Dared Critics to Prove It Misled the Public. These Researchers Just Called the Company’s Bluff.” • Science historian Naomi Oreskes and Harvard researcher Geoffrey Supran have published the first peer-reviewed, comprehensive analysis of Exxon Mobil’s climate communications. It adds heft to charges of deceptive climate denial. [Mother Jones]
(Thanks to Tad Montgomery.)

Exxon plant (Matt Brown | AP)

¶ “Trump officials rewrite Energy Dept study to make renewables look bad, fail anyway” • Energy Secretary Rick Perry’s long-awaited grid study is finally out. Trump officials clearly rewrote the previously leaked staff draft to make it look like renewable energy is a threat to baseload power and grid resilience, but they mostly botched the job. [ThinkProgress]

World:

¶ An economic survey released by the Indian government states that by 2026 installed capacity in the renewable energy sector will match that in the thermal power…

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August 24, 2017 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

August 23 Energy News

geoharvey

Science and Technology:

¶ Scientists found that some bacteria have a natural defence to cadmium, mercury, or lead that lets them turn the heavy metal into a sulfide, which the bacteria express as tiny crystals on their surfaces. These turn out to be semiconductors that the bacteria can use to photosynthesize atmospheric carbon dioxide into acetic acid, a chemical feedstock. [BBC]

“Cyborg” bacteria making and using tiny solar panels.

World:

¶ China has installed 24.4 GW of solar PV in the first six months of 2017, including an extraordinary 13.5 GW in the month of June alone, as developers rushed to complete installations to capitalize on a higher feed-in tariff that expired on July 1. The 24.4 GW is equivalent capacity to Australia’s entire fleet of coal-burning power plants. [CleanTechnica]

¶ As India’s energy needs are rising fast, the increased use of renewables could save the…

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August 24, 2017 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

China Builds 24 Billion Watts of Solar in Just Two Months as Trump Attacks Renewables and Defends Coal

robertscribbler

Between the present U.S. Executive Branch and China, we can really tell which government is serious about being a moral leader on the critical issue of climate change and which government continues to wallow in the land of backwards thinking and heartless denial. For as the Trump Administration is doing everything it can to defend the coal-fired ‘Satanic mills’ that are so radically transforming the world for the worst while attacking renewable energy, China is continuing to build the solar farms that are capable of replacing them like gangbusters.

More than 10 Billion Watts Per Month

In June, China added a staggering 13.5 billion watts (gigawatts) of solar panels to its present large and growing solar fleet. In July, the country added another 10.5 gigawatts of solar. The two month total of 24 gigawatts is more than half the size of the total U.S. solar fleet of 44.4…

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August 24, 2017 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

No-go zones keep kin from burying deceased Fukushima evacuees at ancestral gravesites

n-fukushima-a-20170825-870x678Buddhist monks offer prayers for victims of the March 11, 2011, earthquake and tsunami in Namie, Fukushima Prefecture, in March 2014.

 

In Fukushima, 3/11 fallout forcing remains to be stored at temples, ancestral gravesites to be moved

FUKUSHIMA – The remains of Fukushima’s deceased evacuees are being left in limbo because radiation is preventing them from being buried.

In municipalities that remain off-limits because of the fallout from the triple core meltdown at the Fukushima No. 1 power plant in March 2011, the inability of residents to return has put burials for their loved ones on hold.

Instead, many relatives are opting to leave remains in the hands of temples or moved their family graves out of their hometowns.

Choanji, a temple in a no-go zone in the town of Namie, is keeping the remains of about 100 people at a branch facility that was set up in the prefectural capital after the nuclear crisis began.

At the branch, a swordsmanship training room was renovated to enshrine remains that should have been buried in Namie.

Evacuees don’t want to bury the remains of family members in places with high radiation levels,” said the branch’s chief priest, Shuho Yokoyama, 76.

A 66-year-old resident of Minamisoma visited the temple branch on Aug. 12 for the Bon holidays to pray for her elder sister, who died after evacuating the area.

Her remains are kept there because her family’s grave is located in a no-go zone in Namie; the remains of her sister’s husband, who died before the disaster, are already in the family grave.

I am sorry that she is separated from her husband. I want their remains to be buried together,” the woman said.

To enter the no-go zone, residents need to submit applications to the municipal government in question.

The woman is unhappy with the system as she wants permission to enter the areas freely, at least during Bon, the traditional period for commemorating one’s ancestors. Since the disaster began, she has been unable to visit the grave of her brother-in-law.

At Choanji, 20 percent of some 500 families in the congregation have moved their ancestors’ graves to other areas.

Isao Kanno, 50, who hails from Namie but now lives in Tokyo, was in the area just before the remains of his father, who died two months before the meltdowns, were scheduled to be interred.

I can’t be evacuated alone and bury the remains in the grave” in a no-go zone, Kanno said. “I’m considering moving the grave somewhere else.”

Some, however, worry their hometown ties could fade if they move their graves.

Despite being designated a no-go zone, it is my hometown,” said a 57-year-old Tokyo resident who left the remains of one of his relatives at the temple branch.

It is the land of my ancestors, so I’ve never considered moving the grave,” he said.

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2017/08/24/national/no-go-zones-keep-kin-burying-deceased-fukushima-evacuees-ancestral-gravesites/#.WZ71vxdLfrc

August 24, 2017 Posted by | Fukushima 2017 | , | Leave a comment

Japan’s Lobbying to Export Fukushima Produce

If we are to believe the Japanese government and the Fukushima local government all Fukushima produce are deliciously safe for consumption and safe to be exported, all having passed the strictest controls for the foreign consumers 100% safety…..There is no left radiation, nor contamination in Fukushima Prefecture…. Smile and you will remain safe and healthy!!!

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Fukushima food exports to Malaysia rise as radiation stigma fades

KUALA LUMPUR – Fukushima Prefecture aims to export 100 tons of rice and 15 tons of peaches to Malaysia by next year, its governor said Wednesday, evidence of fading concern over the safety of food products from the site of the 2011 nuclear disaster.

“In the aftermath of the earthquake and the nuclear plant incident, the agriculture sector suffered very much. We have to deal with negative rumor. But things are slowly recovering,” Gov. Masao Uchibori said at a press conference in the Malaysian capital Kuala Lumpur.

“We inspect 100 percent of the rice and are working hard to bridge the gap between perception and reality.”

Malaysia began importing rice from Fukushima in May, and has brought in 29 tons so far, Ajwad Abu Hassan, the managing director of Malaysia rice importer Edaran Komachi Sdn., said at the same press conference.

Ajwad said his company aims to import another 48 tons by year-end, and even greater amounts eventually.

“Fukushima produces the best quality rice in Japan. We are proud to sell this rice,” said Ajwad. “We are targeting 100 metric tons a year hopefully. In fact, we are trying to increase from not only 100 metric tons but a container full every month.”

A full shipping container holds about 12 tons.

Akumul Abu Hassan, the managing director of another rice trading company, MHC Co. Ltd, said Malaysia currently consumes about 350 tons of Japonica rice a month imported from various parts of the world including South Korea, Vietnam and China. Only 20 to 30 tons comes from Japan, and that from other prefectures such as Akita, Niigata, Hokkaido and Hiroshima.

But Akumul said when it comes to quality, nothing beats rice from Japan.

“Compare to rice from Japan, that from Vietnam, 5 percent will contain broken grains. You don’t find that in rice from Japan,” Akumul said.

Malaysia began importing Fukushima peaches a year after the disaster, and Takashi Kanno, appearing at the same press conference as a representative of the National Federation of Agricultural Cooperatives, said “Malaysia was one of the first countries to accept and give us an opportunity.”

From almost zero in 2012, Fukushima exported 1.2 tons of peaches to Malaysia in 2013, increasing to 7.3 tons last year and 9.5 tons so far this year.

Fukushima is the second-largest peach producing prefecture in Japan after Yamanashi.

Uchibori said after meeting with trading companies involved in exporting peaches, the federation has set a goal of selling 15 tons a year to Malaysia, as peaches are now being sent by ship instead of by air, which will lower the cost.

Fukushima Prefecture also exports broccoli, shiitake mushrooms and persimmons to Malaysia.

https://japantoday.com/category/business/fukushima-food-exports-to-malaysia-rise-as-radiation-stigma-fades

August 24, 2017 Posted by | Fukushima 2017 | , | Leave a comment

Radiation Hotspots Near Tokyo

From Sugar Nat

Present radiation hotspots in Nagareyama city, Chiba Prefecture (near Tokyo)

 

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Measure taken at 1m from the ground : 0.57μSv/h

 

21032739_1763450793683671_4221181375008795887_n

Measure taken at 50cm from the ground : 0.89μSv/h

 

20953963_1763452647016819_2203591793701310620_n

Measure taken at ground level : 2.17μSv/h

 

Read more in Japanese :

http://hotspot-i-t.blogspot.fr/2017/06/blog-post_11.html?m=1

August 24, 2017 Posted by | Fukushima 2017 | , , | Leave a comment