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New research identifies Fukushima reactor material in the environment

Through the analysis of specific fallout particles in the environment, a joint UK-Japan team of scientists has uncovered new insights into the sequence of events that led to the Fukushima nuclear accident in March 2011.

 

3D-i-696x519.jpgLeft: A 3D image that allowed the researchers to discover the distribution of elements within the sample Right: An X-Ray Tomography scan showing the interior structure of the particle Credit: University of Bristol/Diamond Light Source

 

June 26, 2019

Air-fall material got from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) mishap has formerly been isolated and examined from regions across Japan, expanding many kilometers from the facility.

Like the Chernobyl accident of April 1986, the incident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) has been grouped by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) at Level 7 (the most serious) of the International Nuclear Event Scale (INES) as a result of the enormous amount of radioactivity released into nature.

Indeed, even now, eight years after the accident, significant areas encompassing the plant remain evacuated because of the high levels of radioactivity that still exist. It is anticipated that a few people may be unable to come back to their homes as an outcome of the accident.

Following the isolation of the sub-mm particulate from environmental samples obtained from localities close to the FDNPP, a new study has uncovered new insights into the sequence of events that led to the Fukushima nuclear accident.

The multi-organisation research, led by Dr. Peter Martin and Professor Tom Scott from the University of Bristol’s South West Nuclear Hub in collaboration with scientists from Diamond Light Source, the UK’s national synchrotron facility, and the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA).

Following the isolation of the sub-mm particulate from natural samples acquired from regions near the FDNPP, scientists used the high-resolution combined x-ray tomography and x-ray fluorescence mapping capacities of the Coherence Imaging (I13) beamline at the Diamond Light Source.

From these outcomes, it was conceivable to decide the location of the various constituents distributed throughout the highly- porous fallout molecule, including the precise places of micron-scale inclusions of uranium around the exterior of the particle.

Scientists then analyzed the specific physical and chemical nature of the uranium utilizing the Microfocus Spectroscopy (I18) beamline at Diamond.

By focusing on the profoundly focused X-ray beam onto the regions of enthusiasm inside the sample and analyzing the particular outflow sign produced, it was conceivable to confirm that the uranium was of nuclear origin and had not been sourced from the environment.

Final affirmation of the FDNPP origin of the uranium was performed on the particulate utilizing mass-spectrometry strategies at the University of Bristol, where the particular uranium mark of the considerations was coordinated to reactor Unit 1.

Just as crediting the material to a particular source on the FDNPP site the outcomes have also given scientists pivotal data to summon a component through which to clarify the occasions that happened at reactor Unit 1.

Dr Peter Martin (University of Bristol) and Dr Yukihiko Satou (Japan Atomic Energy Agency) at the Diamond Light Source facilities.
University of Bristol/Diamond Light Source

Dr. Peter Martin, senior author of the study said, “I am very pleased that this research has been recognized in Nature Communications. It is a tribute to the excellent collaboration of our partners at JAEA and Diamond Light Source. We have learned an invaluable amount about the long-term environmental effects of the Fukushima accident from this single particle as well as develop unique analytical techniques to further research into nuclear decommissioning.”

June 27, 2019 Posted by | fukushima 2019 | , , , | Leave a comment

Ringhals NPP -Seawater leak shuts down Swedish nuclear reactor

“Recent studies found that Swedes have become more negative towards nuclear energy, particularly since the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in Japan. According to a survey carried out by the SOM Institute at Gothenburg University, 44 percent of Swedes favor phasing out nuclear power, either immediately or at the end of the lifespan of the current plants. Only 35 percent were in favor of expanding the use of nuclear energy.”

Published: 21 December, 2012
RT

Swedish authorities have ordered the shutdown of a reactor at its largest nuclear power plant near Gothenburg following a seawater leak. The leak is the latest in a string of similar incidents that have plagued the Swedish nuclear industry.

“There is no safety problem” at Reactor 4 of the Ringhals plant, nuclear authority inspector Jan Gällsjo told the national TT news agency. However, the presence of saltwater in the pressurized water system is an irregularity that needs to be repaired, Gällsjo added.

The Ringhals power station is located on Sweden’s southwest coast near Gothenburg, the country’s second largest city.

Earlier this month, the Radiation Safety Authority ordered the shutdown of reactor O2 at the Oskarshamn plant due to safety concerns, the Local reported. Several days later, an investigation found cracks in two of the 10 pools in which nuclear waste is stored. Nuclear waste management contractor SKB was ordered to review security and safety requirements before the reactor can be brought back online.

A report published in October by environmental organization Greenpeace heavily criticized safety conditions at Sweden’s nuclear plants.

“We are killing off the myth that Swedish nuclear power is safe. Swedish power plants are old, have great security risks, there is a lack of both personnel and skills and a large number of incidents are occurring,” said Rolf Lindahl, one of the authors of the report.

The plants, which were built in the 1970s and 1980s, are being pushed to create more energy, which is putting a strain on the facilities. Rather than taking steps to guarantee the safety of the aging stations, plant operators seem to be motivated by “financial gains,” Lindahl said.

The Ringhal station had been slammed earlier for not having sufficient protection against earthquakes and floods, according to the report. It now seems that the Forsmark and Oskarshamn plants face the same threats from natural disasters.

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December 21, 2012 Posted by | Uncategorized | , | 1 Comment