nuclear-news

The News That Matters about the Nuclear Industry Fukushima Chernobyl Mayak Three Mile Island Atomic Testing Radiation Isotope

We Now Return to Your Regularly Scheduled Nuclear Crisis

 https://slate.com/news-and-politics/2018/02/the-olympics-sure-were-fun-now-back-to-the-terrifying-nuclear-crisis.html

The Olympics are over, and the high-stakes Trump-Kim showdown is no closer to resolution. By FRED KAPLAN, FEB 27, 2018 

Advertisements

March 3, 2018 Posted by | weapons and war | Leave a comment

Displayed sign carried during a demonstration in Japan, at the end of the seventh year…

28468697_1344420375663781_1147162460269051904_n.jpg
From Shuji-san:
 
Displayed sign carried during a demonstration in Japan, at the end of the seventh year…
 
“Do not forget Fukushima, but please do not come to Fukushima.”
“Do not forget Fukushima, but please do not eat anything in Fukushima.”
“When everyone comes to Fukushima for sightseeing, children of Fukushima will not escape.”
“When you eat the food of Fukushima, the children in Fukushima are eating radioactive substances. “

March 3, 2018 Posted by | Fukushima 2018 | , | Leave a comment

About Fukushima Food Contamination

28472116_1344425352329950_5486588740866408448_n
From Shuji-san:
 
It will become increasingly severe in the future to turn your eyes off from the facts or interpret the facts with distortion.
 
Exports from Japan will also increase.
 
If we do not keep informed only to those who are willing to face facts, there will be no end to the increase and spread of damage.
 
I am translating this illustration into native language of various countries and sending it.

March 3, 2018 Posted by | Fukushima 2018 | , | Leave a comment

Nukespeak: The language used about nuclear weapons helps make the idea of using them “clean’and “acceptable”

The antiseptic language of Nukespeak cleans up the very dirty business of nuclear weapons https://www.jsonline.com/story/opinion/contributors/2018/02/27/nukespeak-cleans-up-language-nuclear-holocaust/378235002/ Paul Carroll  March 1, 2018  The first nuclear explosion, in the New Mexico desert in July 1945, came from a massive spherical bomb with radioactive plutonium at its core. It was playfully called “The Gadget.”  

March 3, 2018 Posted by | 2 WORLD, culture and arts, weapons and war | Leave a comment

Climate change urgency: the Arctic is heating

Antarctic ice sheet loss and sea level rise Guardian[Excellent graphs]  1 March 2018 

dana1981 more https://www.theguardian.com/environment/climate-consensus-97-per-cent/2018/mar/01/decisions-today-will-decide-antarctic-ice-sheet-loss-and-sea-level-rise

A new study looks at how much global sea level will continue to rise even if we manage to meet the Paris climate target of staying below 2°C hotter than pre-industrial temperatures. The issue is that sea levels keep rising for several hundred years after we stabilize temperatures, largely due to the continued melting of ice sheets in Antarctica and Greenland from the heat already in the climate system.

The study considered two scenarios. In the first, human carbon pollution peaks somewhere between 2020 and 2035 and falls quickly thereafter, reaching zero between 2035 and 2055 and staying there. Global temperatures in the first scenario peak at and remain steady below 2°C. In the second scenario, we capture and sequester carbon to reach net negative emissions (more captured than emitted) between 2040 and 2060, resulting in falling global temperatures in the second half of the century.

The authors found that global average sea level will most likely rise by about 1.3 meters by 2300 in the first scenario, and by 1 meter in the second. However, there is large uncertaintydue to how little we understand about the stability of the large ice sheets in Greenland and especially Antarctica. At the high end of possible ice sheet loss, we could see as much as 4.5 meters of sea level rise by 2300 in the first scenario, and close to 3 meters in the second scenario.

The study also shows that it’s critical that our carbon pollution peaks soon. Each 5-year delay – a peak in 2025 instead of 2020, for example – most likely adds 20 cm of sea level rise by 2300, and could potentially add a full meter due to the uncertainty associated with the large ice sheets:

we find that a delay of global peak emissions by 5 years in scenarios compatible with the Paris Agreement results in around 20 cm of additional median sea-level rise in 2300 … we estimate that each 5 years of delay bear the risk of an additional 1 m of sea-level rise by 2300 … Delayed near-term mitigation action in the next decades will leave a substantial legacy for long-term sea-level rise.

And remember, this is all for scenarios in which we meet the Paris climate targets, which we’re currently not on pace to achieve. If we miss the Paris targets, sea levels will rise higher yet.

Another new study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, found that sea level rise has been accelerating. If the rate of acceleration continues – which the lead author notes is a conservative estimate – we would see an additional 65 cm (close to a meter above pre-industrial sea level) of sea level rise by 2100.

Yet another new study published in The Cryosphere using satellite data found that while the East Antarctic Ice Sheet has remained stable in recent years, ice loss from the West Antarctic Ice Sheet has accelerated. Antarctica is now discharging 1.93 trillion tons of ice each year, up from about 1.89 trillion tons per year in 2008. When accounting for snow accumulation, the continent is losing about 183 billion tons of ice per year – enough to raise sea levels by about 3 to 5 millimeters per decade by itself. The melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet is likewise accelerating and is now responsible for about 25% of annual sea level rise (8.5 millimeters per decade).

Meanwhile, the Arctic has been remarkably warm in February – as much as 35°C hotter than average in some areas. In mid-winter, when sea ice should be growing, in the Bering Sea it’s instead shrinking.

The hot Arctic is important because the temperature difference between the Arctic and lower latitudes is one of the main forces that keeps the jet stream moving steadily west-to-east. With a hot Arctic, the jet stream is weakened, leading to weird weather in the USA and Europe. As a result, the western states have been experiencing relatively quite cold temperatures, while the US east coast has been unseasonably hot.

To sum up, ice sheet melt is accelerating, as in turn is sea level rise. Even if we manage to achieve the Paris target of less than 2°C global warming above pre-industrial temperatures, we’re likely to eventually see more than a meter of sea level rise, and potentially several meters. The longer we take to reach peak carbon pollution in the coming years, the higher the oceans will rise. Disappearing sea ice in the rapidly-warming Arctic also appears to be causing increasingly weird and extreme weather in places like America and Europe.

March 3, 2018 Posted by | ARCTIC, climate change, Reference | Leave a comment

The plight of the world’s big lakes, in the era of climate change

What a great article! and magnificent photos!. And Kenneth Weiss has a degree in folklore! Doesn’t that tell us something?

We are in an age where we are constantly being told that STEM (Science Technology Engineering Maths) are what matters most – indeed, are all that matters. Well- yes, they do matter. But what about the humanities – arts, social studies, history literature, cultures? We need more Kenneth Weiss’s – more students of folklore !

Combating Desertification and Drought, TerraViva United Nations Some of the World’s Biggest Lakes Are Drying Up. Here’s Why. [see this article if only for the superb photos]   

“……………..Around the globe, climate change is warming many lakes faster than it’s warming the oceans and the air. This heat accelerates evaporation, conspiring with human mismanagement to intensify water shortages, pollution, and loss of habitat for birds and fish. But while “the fingerprints of climate change are everywhere, they don’t look the same in every lake,” says Catherine O’Reilly, an aquatic ecologist at Illinois State University and co-leader of a worldwide lake survey by 64 scientists.

In eastern China’s Lake Tai, for example, farm runoff and sewage stimulate cyanobacterial blooms, and warm water encourages growth. The organisms threaten drinking-water supplies for two million people. East Africa’s Lake Tanganyika has warmed so much that fish catches that feed millions of poor people in four surrounding countries are at risk. The water behind Venezuela’s massive Guri hydroelectric dam has reached such critically low levels in recent years that the government has had to cancel classes for schoolchildren in an effort to ration electricity. Even the Panama Canal, with its locks recently widened and deepened to accommodate supersize cargo vessels, is troubled by El Niño–related rainfall shortages affecting man-made Gatun Lake, which supplies not only water to run the locks but also fresh drinking water for much of the country. Low water levels have also forced limits on the draft of ships so the ships don’t run aground in the lake.

Of all the challenges lakes face in a warming world, the starkest examples are in closed drainage basins where waters flow into lakes but don’t exit into rivers or a sea. These terminal, or endorheic, lakes tend to be shallow, salty, and hypersensitive to disturbance. The vanishing act of the Aral Sea in Central Asia is a disastrous example of what can happen to such inland waters. In its case the main culprits were ambitious Soviet irrigation projects that diverted its nourishing rivers.

Africa’s Lake Chad is a sliver of its former self. Iran’s Lake Urmia has shrunk by 80 percent in 30 years. What remain are the carcasses of ships settled into the silt.

Similar scenarios are playing out in terminal lakes on nearly every continent, a combination of overuse and worsening drought. Side-by-side satellite images reveal the shocking toll. Lake Chad in Africa has shrunk to a sliver of its former self since the 1960s, heightening shortages of fish and irrigation water. Displaced people and refugees who now depend on the lake put an additional strain on resources. Shortages as well as tensions in the hot, dry Sahel are driving conflict and mass migration. Utah’s Great Salt Lake and California’s Salton Sea and Mono Lake have undergone periods of recession too, diminishing critical breeding and nesting areas for birds as well as playgrounds for recreational boaters.

After the Caspian Sea, Iran’s Lake Urmia was once the largest saltwater lake in the Middle East. But it has shrunk by some 80 percent over the past 30 years. The flamingos that feasted on brine shrimp are mostly gone. So are the pelicans, egrets, and ducks. What remain are piers that lead nowhere, the rusting carcasses of ships settled into the silt, and white, barren salt flats. Winds that whip across the lake bed blow salt dust to farm fields, slowly rendering the soil infertile. Noxious, salt-tinged dust storms inflame the eyes, skin, and lungs of people 60 miles away in Tabriz, a city of more than 1.5 million. And in recent years Urmia’s alluring turquoise waters have been stained blood-red from bacteria and algae that flourish and change color when salinity increases and sunlight penetrates the shallows. Many of the tourists who once flocked here for therapeutic baths are staying away.

Although climate change has intensified droughts and elevated hot summer temperatures around Urmia, speeding up evaporation, that’s only part of the story. Urmia has thousands of illegal wells and a proliferation of dams and irrigation projects that divert water from tributary rivers to grow apples, wheat, and sunflowers. Experts worry that Urmia could fall victim to the same overexploitation of water as the Aral Sea. ……..

We live in an era of the most forced migration since the Second World War. We are going to need to support those who are ravaged by climate change so they can migrate with dignity.

William Lacy Swing director general of the United Nations’ International Organization for Migration

In sheer numbers those fleeing “natural” calamities have outnumbered those fleeing war and conflict for decades. Still, these figures do not include people forced to abandon their homelands because of drought or gradual environmental degradation; almost two and a half billion people live in areas where human demand for water exceeds the supply. Globally the likelihood of being uprooted from one’s home has increased 60 percent compared with 40 years ago because of the combination of rapid climate change and growing populations moving into more vulnerable areas.

Most of these displaced people stay within their home countries. If they cross a border, they do not qualify for UN protections as refugees because they cannot claim they are fleeing violence or persecution. “We live in an era of the most forced migration since the Second World War,” says William Lacy Swing, director general of the United Nations’ International Organization for Migration. “This time, though, in addition to war, climate is looming as a major driver. We are going to need to support those who are ravaged by climate change so they can migrate with dignity.”……..

When glaciers first begin to melt, they provide an extra flush of water, explains Dirk Hoffmann, a German researcher based in La Paz who co-authored the book Bolivia in a 4-Degree Warmer World. “But we’ve probably reached peak water in most glacial watersheds,” he says, meaning that meltwater from glaciers will now diminish in the region until it is gone. …….

Second World War. We are going to need to support those who are ravaged by climate change so they can migrate with dignity.

William Lacy Swing director general of the United Nations’ International Organization for Migration

In sheer numbers those fleeing “natural” calamities have outnumbered those fleeing war and conflict for decades. Still, these figures do not include people forced to abandon their homelands because of drought or gradual environmental degradation; almost two and a half billion people live in areas where human demand for water exceeds the supply. Globally the likelihood of being uprooted from one’s home has increased 60 percent compared with 40 years ago because of the combination of rapid climate change and growing populations moving into more vulnerable areas.

Most of these displaced people stay within their home countries. If they cross a border, they do not qualify for UN protections as refugees because they cannot claim they are fleeing violence or persecution. “We live in an era of the most forced migration since the Second World War,” says William Lacy Swing, director general of the United Nations’ International Organization for Migration. “This time, though, in addition to war, climate is looming as a major driver. We are going to need to support those who are ravaged by climate change so they can migrate with dignity.”……..

When glaciers first begin to melt, they provide an extra flush of water, explains Dirk Hoffmann, a German researcher based in La Paz who co-authored the book Bolivia in a 4-Degree Warmer World. “But we’ve probably reached peak water in most glacial watersheds,” he says, meaning that meltwater from glaciers will now diminish in the region until it is gone. ……..http://www.ipsnews.net/2018/03/worlds-biggest-lakes-drying-heres/

March 3, 2018 Posted by | 2 WORLD, climate change, water | Leave a comment

Russia’s near nuclear disaster outside Murmansk in 2011

While Putin brags about new nuclear weapons, his Deputy Prime Minister admits near-disaster outside Murmansk in 2011,  https://thebarentsobserver.com/en/security/2018/03/while-putin-brags-about-new-nuclear-missiles-his-deputy-prime-minister-admits-world By Thomas NilsenMarch 01, 2018

Russian President Vladimir Putin spent much of his state-of-the-nation speech on Thursday talking about nuclear weapons. With a clear message to the United States, he especially highlighted new missiles that would be immune to possible missile defence shields.

“Nobody has anything like this,” Putin said simultaneously as a video animation was displayed on big screens, showing how both Russia’s new ballistic-  and cruise missiles can’t be intercepted.

Putin’s nuclear war-drumming were applauded by the audience in Moscow consisting of the country’s lawmakers, ministers, high-ranking officials and key business bosses. Around the world, the President’s speech got massive media attention.

What got much less attention, was a small sentence in a larger interview with Russia’s Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Rogozin published by newspaper Kommersant this week.

Rogozin, who was Russia’s ambassador to NATO in Brussels until December 2011, talks in the interview about his first days at work as Deputy Prime Minister in charge of defence industry.

“The presidential decree on appointment was issued on December 23,” Dmitry Rogozin says when explaining why he will remember the first days in new position for the rest of his life: “a fire on board the ballistic missile submarine “Ekaterinburg” in the dock of the shipyard in Roslyakovo.”

Rogozin and other military officials tried to predict what could happen and had to make quick decisions, because, as he puts it: “After all, the vessel did not unload the weapons before the repair: there were torpedoes on board, and regular ballistic missiles.”

Ekaterinburg” was at the time one of the Northern Fleet’s six ballistic missile submarines and a core part of the naval leg in Russia’s nuclear triad. The submarine, also known as K-84, is a Delta-IV class that normally carries 16 ballistic missiles, each armed with four nuclear warheads. That means up to 64 nuclear bombs in the missile tubes at the time when the fire started on December 29.

Additionally, the submarine is powered by two nuclear reactors.

The reactors were shut down when the K-84 was taken into the dock on December 8, and when the fire made headlines across Russia and international media, Defence Ministry officials assured the world that also the missiles had been removed. What Rogozin now says in the interview with Kommersant confirms what many for years have believed; the removal of the nuclear-armed missiles was simply not true.

Not removing the nuclear missiles or other weapons is a violation of the navy’s safety regulations and practice when submarines are taken into a dock for repair.

After about 20 hours, the fire on the rubber coating of the submarine was put out simply by lowering the dock and let seawater in. What worst-case scenario could have been if the torpedo fuel or ballistic missile fuel had caught fire is hard to imagine. 

Rogozin himself went to the shipyard just north of Murmansk a few days later to personally thank the workers who had saved the submarine “and all of us from the grave consequences.”

The R29RM missiles used liquid fuel and in a worst case scenario with burning fuel, the missiles could have exploded and fragmented the plutonium warheads and spread radioactivity to the surrounding area. Additionally, parts of the plutonium could have been taken up in the atmosphere by the smoke from the fire and  brought over longer distances by the wind.

In the aftermath of the fire, both Norway’s Foreign Minister Jonas Gahr Støre and Sweden’s Foreign Minister Carl Bildt said they were critical to the lack of official information from Moscow.

“Most of what I know, I have learned through the media,” Bildt said to Swedish TV. Støre said when the fire was debated in the Norwegian Parliament two months later that “when there is a fire in a submarine we are worried. There are extra reasons to be worried after what we have heard the last few days from official Russian spokespersons, that there could have been nuclear weapons on board.”

The question about possible nuclear weapons on board K-84 started to spread when the fire became known in the Murmansk area.

Roslyakovo is a settlement with a few thousand inhabitants located six kilometres north of Murmansk and seven kilometres southwest of the Northern Fleet’s main base Severomorsk.

More than 400,000 people were living within a radius of about 30 kilometres from the submarine on fire. That includes the two cities of Murmansk and Kola, and the five closed military towns of Severomorsk, Snezhnogorsk, Polyarny, Gadzhiyevo and Vidyaevo. The Norwegian town of Kirkenes is 145 kilometres away while Finland’s northernmost town of Ivalo is 230 kilometres from Roslyakovo.

Serious accidents involving nuclear weapons, including fires, are infrequent but have happened before. The best known was back in 1968 when an American B-52 carrying four hydrogen bombs crashed at Thule Air Base on Greenland. Radioactive plutonium was then spread over a larger area. In 1991, an are intest-missile exploded in the silo on board a Typhoon submarine loaded with 19 nuke-missiles and caught fire in the White Sea.

Two years before, the Northern Fleet’s submarine “Komsomolets” caught fire in the Norwegian Sea and sank with two nuclear torpedoes on board. “Komsomolets” and her two warheads are still on the seabed some 160 kilometres southwest of the Bear Island.

March 3, 2018 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Daniel Ellsberg on the urgent need to dismantle the doomsday nuclear weapons machine

You would not have these arsenals, in the US or elsewhere, if it were not the case that it was highly profitable to the military-industrial complex, to the aerospace industry, to the electronics industry, and to the weapons design labs to keep modernizing these weapons, improving accuracy, improving launch time, all that. The military–industrial complex that Eisenhower talked about is a very powerful influence. We’ve talked about unwarranted influence. We’ve had that for more than half a century.

……….  What’s it all for? It is for [military] service share of the budget. Lockheed Martin, Boeing, Grumman, Northrop. Jobs, jobs, jobs, jobs, as one after another official has put it, from James Baker to others. Profits, as I say, jobs, and campaign donations. 

Daniel Ellsberg on dismantling the doomsday machine,  Bulletin of Atomic Scientists, John Mecklin , 26 FEBRUARY 2018

More than 45 years after he became famous for leaking the Pentagon Papers and earning the wrath of President Richard Nixon and his plumbers, Daniel Ellsberg is again a focus of public consciousness. The hit movie The Post reprises part of the Pentagon Papers story, reminding older Americans (and explaining to younger viewers) how Ellsberg’s decision to reveal a top-secret history of duplicitous US policy in Indochina changed the course of the Vietnam War and American history.

And shortly before The Post premiered early in January, Ellsberg’s latest book, The Doomsday Machine: Confessions of a Nuclear War Plannerwas published to significant national media attention.

In the book, Ellsberg chronicles his early career as a RAND Corporation analyst deeply involved in the crafting of American nuclear war plans in the 1960s—plans that were meant to be more controlled and discriminating than earlier versions but, he came eventually to understand, were actually blueprints for the obliteration of civilization.

“Working, conscientiously, obsessively, on a wrong problem, countering an illusory threat, I and my colleagues at RAND had distracted ourselves and helped distract others from dealing with the real dangers posed by the mutual superpower pursuit of nuclear weapons—dangers which we were helping make worse—and from real opportunities to make the world more secure,” Ellsberg writes. “Unintentionally, yet inexcusably, we made our country and the world less safe.”

Since the 1970s, Ellsberg has been deeply involved in efforts to reduce world nuclear arsenals and eventually eliminate them altogether. He and I spoke at length earlier this year about how the danger of nuclear weapons might be conveyed more effectively to the general public. What follows is an edited transcript of parts of that wide-ranging conversation……….

John Mecklin: The major media tend to almost never actually confront or describe the actual effects of a major nuclear war. Why do you think that is?

Daniel Ellsberg: That’s hard for me to say, really. I certainly agree with you. I would say they have been shockingly derelict in reporting this. I can’t give an answer. I haven’t been able to ask their editors what’s going on

But it’s a very interesting question. My speculative answer would have to be that the major media have always supported basically—until quite recently perhaps—our basic nuclear arsenals. Insane as they are; they’re unjustifiable, if you really look at them critically. And yet they’re treated as though they are reasonable responses to the nuclear era, which they are not. Nothing reasonable about them at all.

You would not have these arsenals, in the US or elsewhere, if it were not the case that it was highly profitable to the military-industrial complex, to the aerospace industry, to the electronics industry, and to the weapons design labs to keep modernizing these weapons, improving accuracy, improving launch time, all that. The military–industrial complex that Eisenhower talked about is a very powerful influence. We’ve talked about unwarranted influence. We’ve had that for more than half a century.

……….  What’s it all for? It is for [military] service share of the budget. Lockheed Martin, Boeing, Grumman, Northrop. Jobs, jobs, jobs, jobs, as one after another official has put it, from James Baker to others. Profits, as I say, jobs, and campaign donations. It’s embedded in all 50 states of the union, one way or another, in the various expenditures, and very hard to get rid of. Almost impossible. I just don’t see that you can say it’s impossible……….I would also say that no significant change has occurred at all, and we are maintaining this mad policy. But it is being done, again, in the absence of almost any public awareness or debate. In the last several elections—but let’s take the last one in particular—nuclear winter, of course is not mentioned. But there’s really no dispute that came up significantly about the arms budget, about the nuclear budget, or any of the rest of it. That’s hardly an excuse, but it’s an explanation in a way for no media discussion of it, except in the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists, thanks a lot. Your role is essential but not sufficient, it would seem. ………. https://thebulletin.org/daniel-ellsberg-dismantling-doomsday-machine11539

March 3, 2018 Posted by | USA, weapons and war | Leave a comment

Nevada residents urged to renew the fight against Yucca Mountain nuclear waste dump plan

Nevada, keep up the fight against nuclear waste: RGJ Editorial Board (includes poll – currently 45% opposed)  http://www.rgj.com/story/opinion/editorials/2018/03/01/nevada-keep-up-fight-against-nuclear-waste-rgj-editorial-board/387365002/  RGJ Editorial Board  March 1, 2018 

March 3, 2018 Posted by | USA, wastes | Leave a comment

A new proposal to store nuclear waste in New Mexico

Proposal advances to store nuclear waste in New Mexico, https://abcnews.go.com/Technology/wireStory/proposal-advances-store-nuclear-waste-mexico-53456176

A new proposal to store nuclear waste underground in southern New Mexico — this time from nuclear reactors across the country — has cleared an initial regulatory hurdle and can now be vetted for detailed safety, security and environmental concerns, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission announced Thursday.

Federal nuclear regulators said the proposal from Holtec International to temporarily store spent nuclear fuel in southeastern New Mexico is sufficiently complete to begin the technical review process that eventually involves expert testimony and public comment.

Holtec is seeking an initial 40-year license for an underground storage facility that could accept radioactive used fuel piling up at reactors across the United States.

Southern New Mexico already is the site of the nation’s only underground nuclear waste repository that handles radioactive material from decades of bomb-making nuclear research. A 2014 radiation release at the Waste Isolation Pilot Project caused by an inappropriately packed container of waste forced the closer of that facility for three years, with extended repairs estimated to cost more than half a billion dollars.

For the proposed spent nuclear fuel storage facility, safety advocates have warned of transportation risks associated with moving massive casks of used fuel thousands of miles to New Mexico, and urged the public to speak up about the proposal.

“Up to now, it’s been Holtec talking to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for the last 11 months,” said Don Hancock, nuclear programs director for the Southwest Research and Information Center, an Albuquerque-based environmental protection group. “Now the public is going to be able to get involved.”

Many local residents and politicians including New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinezhave voiced support for Holtec’s plans.

In a written notice to Holtec, federal nuclear regulators outlined a series of reviews that could be completed by July 2020 — or be delayed and suspended, based on responses from the company and safety determinations.

Federal officials have long acknowledged that the future of nuclear energy in the U.S. depends on the ability to manage used fuel and high-level radioactive waste.

Since President Donald Trump took office, some members of Congress have shown renewed interested in the mothballed Yucca Mountain project in Nevada as a long-term solution. But the industry has shown support for temporary storage as part of the storage equation because of the amount of time it would take to license a facility at Yucca Mountain.

March 3, 2018 Posted by | USA, wastes | Leave a comment

Britain’s Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) wasted tax-payers’money bigtime , in its failed contract with Cavendish Fluor

Nucnet 1st March 2018, The Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) completely failed in both the procurement and management of a contract to clean up the UK’s Magnox
nuclear reactor and research sites, a report by the Public Accounts
Committee says.

The report, released on 28 February 2018, says this
disrupted an important component of vital nuclear decommissioning work and
cost the taxpayer upwards of £122m (€137m, $167m). The £6.2bn contract
— one of the largest awarded by the UK government — was to dismantle 12
first-generation Magnox nuclear sites.

It was awarded to Cavendish Fluor Partnership, a joint venture between UK-based Babcock International and
Fluor of the US. The committee, which oversees government expenditure,
said: “The NDA ran an overly complex procurement process, resulting in it
awarding the contract to the wrong bidder, and subsequently settling legal
claims from a losing consortium to the tune of nearly £100m.”

The committee also said the NDA, a public body established in 2004 to oversee
the clean-up of the UK’s nuclear legacy, “drastically
under-estimated” the scale of the work needed to decommission the sites
at the time it let the contract – a failure which ultimately led to the
termination of the Magnox contract nine years early.

The NDA did not have sufficient capability to manage the procurement or the complex process of
resolving differences between what the contractor was told to expect on the
sites and what it actually found, the committee concluded.

The NDA will now  have to spend even more effort and money to find a suitable way of managing
these sites after the contract comes to an official end in September 2019,
the committee said. The NDA may have further wasted taxpayers’ money by
paying its previous contractor for work that was not done. The NDA cannot
fully account for £500m of the £2.2bn increase in the cost of the
contract between September 2014 and March 2017. In particular, it does not
know whether the £500m cost increase was due to its incorrect assumptions
about the state of the sites when it let the contract or underperformance
by the previous contractor.
https://www.nucnet.org/all-the-news/2018/03/01/accounts-committee-says-nda-completely-failed-with-6-2-billion-uk-magnox-contract

March 3, 2018 Posted by | business and costs, decommission reactor, politics, UK | Leave a comment

Cancer epidemic: health and environmental toll of U.S. military operations on Terceira Island in the Azores

Anti-Nuclear Movement Founder Backs Cancer Crisis Clean-Up at US Base in Azores,  1 March 2018 , WASHINGTON (Sputnik) – The cancer epidemic sweeping Terceira Island in the Azores, home to the US Air Base at Lajes, is a health crisis that requires an immediate environmental cleanup, Dr. Helen Caldicott, founder of a Nobel Peace Prize anti-nuclear movement told Sputnik.

March 3, 2018 Posted by | climate change, health, OCEANIA | Leave a comment

New Jersey’s largest utility is canceling spending on nuclear power project

PSEG canceling nuclear plant spending due to stalled bailout, By: MICHAEL CATALINI, Associated Press 

Public Service Enterprise Group said in a Securities and Exchange Commission filing dated Wednesday that it will halt the projects at the Salem nuclear plant in southern New Jersey. A spokesman said the spending covered efficiency and reliability maintenance.

PSEG says the decision comes after “recent postponements” of a vote on legislation to provide the financial rescue. The bill, which has undergone several changes and was held during a recent session, includes clean-energy requirements that lawmakers say were sought by Democratic Gov. Phil Murphy.

PSEG filed the document along with Exelon, which is a co-owner of the plant. It said that funding for the projects may be restored if legislation is enacted “that sufficiently values the attributes of nuclear generation and Salem benefits from such legislation.”…….http://www.actionnewsjax.com/news/pseg-canceling-nuclear-plant-spending-due-to-stalled-bailout/709838467

 

March 3, 2018 Posted by | business and costs, USA | Leave a comment

The UK Energy Research Centre (Ukerc) wants a change in funding renewable energy projects, to make the system fairer

Guardian 2nd March 2018, The richest households should pay £410 a year more towards supporting
energy subsidies for wind farms, solar rooftops and home insulation
schemes, government-funded researchers have urged.

The UK Energy Research Centre (Ukerc) said that shifting environmental and social levies off
electricity bills and instead loading them on to general taxation would
reduce the cost of energy for more than two thirds of households. The
researchers argued the current approach to funding low-carbon power and
energy efficiency was regressive.

The poorest households spend 10% of their income on heating and keeping the lights on, compared to 3% for the
richest.

The report by Ukerc found that shifting the costs to taxation
would save the poorest 10% of households £102 a year, “a significant
difference for them”. Meanwhile the 10% of the country with the highest
income would pay an extra £410 a year, “a relatively small difference”
for such earners.

The two high income brackets below the richest group
would see rises of between £26 and £102 a year, while the remaining 70%
would see no change or a decrease.

John Barrett, professor of energy and  climate policy, who worked on the analysis, said the status quo was hurting
the switch to greener energy. Subsidies for low-carbon power cost
billpayers £5.2bn in 2016-17 but are projected by the Treasury to rise to
£8.6bn in 2024-25 as new wind farms and other projects come online.
Campaigners have said for years that funding green energy subsidies through
energy bills is regressive because the poor are disproportionately
affected, but there has been little political appetite for a change.
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/mar/02/richest-uk-households-should-pay-more-to-fund-clean-energy

March 3, 2018 Posted by | renewable, UK | Leave a comment

Greenpeace anti nuclear protestors broke into French nuclear station, set off fireworks – now gaoled

Greenpeace protesters jailed for fireworks stunt at French nuclear plant, The Local Fr.28 Feb 18A French court on Tuesday sentenced two Greenpeace activists to a minimum of two months in jail for breaking into a nuclear power plant and setting off fireworks last year.

Six other protesters were handed five-month suspended sentences for the October stunt at the plant in Cattenom, near the border with Luxembourg, which was intended to show the facility’s vulnerability to attack……..
Greenpeace said the fireworks were set off at the foot of a spent fuel pool — where nuclear plants store highly radioactive fuel rods that are removed from reactors after their use.
After Greenpeace activists broke into another nuclear plant in November, the French government opened a parliamentary inquiry into nuclear safety and security. https://www.thelocal.fr/20180228/greenpeace-protesters-jailed-for-fireworks-stunt-at-french-nuclear-plant

 

March 3, 2018 Posted by | France, opposition to nuclear | Leave a comment