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Cesium reaches interior of Arctic Ocean 8 years after Fukushima nuclear accident

The movement of radioactive cesium originating from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident to reach the Arctic Ocean

Dec. 14, 2021
Cesium-134, a radioactive material that leaked into the sea as a result of the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant of Tokyo Electric Power Co. 4, which was spilled into the sea after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident in 2011, reached the interior of the Arctic Ocean about eight years later, Yuichiro Kumamoto, a senior researcher at the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, summarized the results of a study by April 14. This is the first time that cesium-134 has been detected in the interior of the Arctic Ocean beyond its marginal seas.
 Mr. Kumamoto estimated that cesium-137 washed ashore in the same way. Although the amount of cesium detected is small, he speculates that it is spreading toward the center of the Arctic Ocean.
 After the accident, Kumamoto and his team analyzed seawater from the North Pacific Ocean and other regions. The seawater collected in the Arctic Ocean near latitude 73 degrees north of the Alaskan Peninsula in October 2007 had a concentration of cesium 134 (half-life of about two years) of 0.0 becquerel per cubic meter. 7 becquerels per cubic meter.
https://www.tokyo-np.co.jp/article/148778?fbclid=IwAR2S-MKeN7VgNoSdK7kUmjGXSQsoPrkUptG5sr1gcaHO0CdEgUGRYWCog8k

December 15, 2021 - Posted by | Fukushima 2021 | , ,

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