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Shipments of green laver seaweed from Fukushima resume after seven-year hiatus

As usual I would strongly recommend you to stay away from Japanese food products for safety’s sake. For the ones among you fond of sushi, if you eat sushi in a restaurant please make sure that they are using a non Japanese origin nori wrapping for their sushi, if you make your own sushi at home you better use non Japanese nori, Korean or Taiwanese…
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Green laver, known as aonori (アオノリ; 青海苔) in Japan and parae (파래) in Korean, is a type of edible green seaweed, including species from the genera Monostroma and Enteromorpha. It is commercially cultivated in some bay areas in Japan, Korea, and Taiwan.
It is used in its dried form for Japanese soups, tempura, and material for manufacturing dried nori and tsukudani and rice.
Nori is familiar in the United States and other countries as an ingredient of sushi, being referred to as “nori” (as the Japanese do) or simply as seaweed. Finished products are made by a shredding and rack-drying process that resembles papermaking.
 
SOMA, FUKUSHIMA PREF. – Shipments of green laver from Fukushima Prefecture restarted Monday for the first time in about seven years.
 
Radiation levels for the green laver, a kind of seaweed, were confirmed to be far below the government limit despite concern about contamination due to the crisis at the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear plant, officials said.
 
About 740 kilograms of green laver harvested Monday at aqua farms near Matsukawaura fishing port in the city of Soma was delivered to a local processing plant after being dehydrated to remove pebbles and other objects.
 
Fukushima was a major production area for green laver until the March 2011 tsunami caused major damage to local aqua farms and the port. The Fukushima product is used mainly for ramen and tsukudani (preserved foods), boiled down in soy sauce.
 
“Matsukawaura green laver features a good scent,” said Yuichi Okamura, a 62-year-old member of a local fisheries cooperative. “It’s as beautiful as before the disaster.”
 
Green laver from the prefecture is expected to be available only locally for the time being, as farming it will be on a trial basis for now.
 
Following the March 2011 tsunami and nuclear crisis, the Fukushima Prefectural Federation of Fisheries Co-operative Associations refrained from coastal fishery operations.
 
The test farming, carried out by local fishermen, is taking place more than 10 kilometers from the crippled nuclear plant.
 
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February 5, 2018 - Posted by | Uncategorized

1 Comment »

  1. The Trumputin Trolls from dreamcatcher. “Dont harm us we mean no harm”

    They say they are antinuclear. Do not worry, trumputin means no harm they say. Radchick, Dana Durnford, the enenews crew.
    Trumputin has opened, the most pronuclear power and pronuclear war regime, in history. His cointelpro agents swear , they care about nuclear and fukushima. Trumputin encourages Tepco to open more nucs. Encourages more tainted food to go to the world from Japan. Trumputin, encourages nuclear weapons and more reactors in the most unstable country in the world, Japan. If anyone critcizes the trumputin trolls, they openup their automated echo chambers, that are funded by dark money and republican nsa interests. Fox, infowars, all the altright sites. The overt nazi sites fullblast. They are the ultimate double-think agents. They are pushing hard for the noose to tighten around american democracies neck. The fascist state is moving ahead.

    Reply

    Comment by Gloria | February 5, 2018 | Reply


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