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The News That Matters about the Nuclear Industry

Kazakhstan to seal international nuclear fuel bank when nuclear reactor fuel rods are having problems?

http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:5KlR4S5MzTIJ:www.bne.eu/story5773/Kazakhstan_to_seal_international_nuclear_fuel_bank+&cd=4&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=uk&client=ubuntu

Business News Europe

Cached version only available as it was quickly pulled..  “Management perception” in light of all the nuclear fuel rod incidents occurring in France, UK and the USA. Japans Daichi unit 3 exploded in a different way to the other units and contained some MOX plutonium and nuclear waste fuel rods, did this aggravate the explosion? or were the fuel claddings worn or damaged from running too hot for too long?

bne
February 18, 2014

Kazakhstan is in the final stages of talks with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) on plans to host an international nuclear fuel bank.

As the range of countries investing into nuclear power plants grows, the bank will make it possible for them to buy fuel rather than setting up their own enrichment plants. The launch of the international bank then is designed to help prevent the proliferation of nuclear weapons.

“Kazakhstan is to host the international bank for low-enriched uranium and the IAEA is currently finalizing negotiations on an agreement,” says a statement from the Kazakh ministry of foreign affairs. “We believe that the development of multilateral approaches to the nuclear fuel , including the creation of guaranteed nuclear fuel reserves will promote the peaceful use of nuclear energy.”

A final decision on the bank was expected in 2013, but talks are still ongoing, the statement added. Kazakhstan is the world’s leading uranium producer, and turned out 38% of global production last year. Seventeen uranium mining projects run in the country, 12 of them joint ventures with foreign partners.

Astana has offered the Soviet-built Ulba Metallurgical Plant in Ust-Kamenogorsk, at the very eastern end of the country, as the site for the fuel bank, which will store and distribute low-enriched uranium internationally. In 2012, the head of state nuclear agency Kazatomprom claimed the plant is one of the safest places in the world for uranium storage.

More here;

UK nuclear submarine fleet increases its costs with an undecided future after “high fuel burn up” test of prototype reactor at Dounreay – UK stakeholders ignored again!

…The big nuclear companies threatened DECC from withdrawing all co-operation concerning nuclear matters if they insisted on asking for information that was needed for the stakeholders to argue their points. So, DECC (And NDA) was actually blackmailed (By the “individual and other companies”)….

https://nuclear-news.net/2014/03/06/uk-nuclear-submarine-fleet-increases-its-costs-with-an-undecided-future-after-high-fuel-burn-up-test-of-prototype-reactor-at-dounreay-uk-stakeholders-ignored-again/

European Parliament asking akward questions concerning the fuel cladding on nuclear fuel rods

Parliamentary questions
28 February 2014
P-002367-14
Question for written answer
to the Commission
Rule 117
Werner Langen (PPE)http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?type=WQ&reference=P-2014-002367&format=XML&language=EN
 Subject:  Fuel element cladding at the Cattenom nuclear power plant
In its issue of 14 February 2014 the Trierischer Volksfreund newspaper reported that the fuel element cladding at the Cattenom nuclear power plant had been examined and found to be actually or possibly damaged. If the cladding material were, say, severely corroded, fuel elements might need to be replaced ahead of time, and other problems could arise.1. Is the Commission aware that, according to French media reports, 25 out of the 58 French nuclear power plants have corroded fuel element cladding?

2. Has corrosion of fuel element cladding been known to occur at nuclear power plants, and have there been any proven cases at Cattenom?

3. Has risk analysis ever been brought to bear on what is one of the largest and most efficient, but also one of the oldest, nuclear power plants in France?

4. In the light of the stress testing of nuclear installations in Europe, how does the Commission view the safety implications of this type of corrosion?

5. Does corrosion damage of the kind described have to be reported to the International Energy Agency or neighbouring countries?

 

 

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March 10, 2014 - Posted by | Uncategorized

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