nuclear-news

The News That Matters about the Nuclear Industry Fukushima Chernobyl Mayak Three Mile Island Atomic Testing Radiation Isotope

Namibia: Uranium Association Launched

…Areva’s Trekkopje project, Valencia, Bannerman and Deep Yellow, were forced to redefine their resources, restructure operations, and retrench workers. The projects have basically been ‘moth-balled’.

Existing mines such as Rio Tinto’s Rössing and Paladin’s Langer Heinrich have also been forced to downscale operations through restructuring and lay-offs….

the turn of the century when prices spiked and led to the ‘uranium rush’. At one time there were over 40 exploration companies at work

http://allafrica.com/stories/201311221202.html

THE Namibian Uranium Association (NUA) was launched in Swakopmund on Tuesday.

NUA chairman Deon Garbers said the association aims to be the strategic management centre that will coordinate uranium activities and share ideas and facilities.

NUA is the advocacy body that represents the uranium industry exclusively. It argues for policy change that will let uranium compete on its merits as an energy source appropriate for the needs of the 21st century through research, factual information and advocacy,” he explained.

The association will also enable senior executives in Namibia’s uranium’s industry to shape the context in which the industry operates. Therefore, NUA’s first board members all hold executive management positions at each of the existing and developing uranium projects.

The association’s membership, likewise, includes all the local uranium mining operations and most of Namibia’s leading exploration companies and associated contractors.

The global uranium industry suffered a major blow in 2011 when a tsunami destroyed the Fukushima reactor in Japan, resulting in a price crash. This was aggravated by the selling of vast quantities of weapons-grade nuclear material from the ex-Soviet Union; the global economic slowdown and the natural gas developments in the United States.

These poor conditions, with a uranium oxide price of about US$35 per pound, have led to Namibia’s industry also experiencing a slump.

Areva’s Trekkopje project, Valencia, Bannerman and Deep Yellow, were forced to redefine their resources, restructure operations, and retrench workers. The projects have basically been ‘moth-balled’.

Existing mines such as Rio Tinto’s Rössing and Paladin’s Langer Heinrich have also been forced to downscale operations through restructuring and lay-offs.

What is expected to become the world’s second largest-uranium mine, Swakop Uranium’s Husab Project, is still going ahead as planned, but faces water and power supply challenges as well as having to deal with severely stretched contractor capacity.

Deputy Minister of Mines and Energy, Willem Isaacks, reflected on the development of the uranium sector from where it was dominated by Rössing Uranium till about the turn of the century when prices spiked and led to the ‘uranium rush’. At one time there were over 40 exploration companies at work.

Equally significant was the change in the regulatory environment. First, with only one mine, legislation was minimalistic. As the potential growth was foreseen, so too was the need for a more comprehensive control environment.

From there on, several industry bodies and policies were created; from the Uranium Stewardship Committee and the Uranium Institute, to the Atomic Energy Board and the implementation of the Atomic Energy and Radiation Protection Act. With the latter came the National Radiation Protection Authority, and now the NUA.

“This is a clear step that the industry continues to bring its part to the wheel of progress with a new reshaped self-regulating body,” he said.

He called the NUA a “watchdog” – “not to protect its territory against unwanted strangers, but to guard over themselves, to keep themselves on their toes and ensure that they do the right thing”.

November 24, 2013 - Posted by | Uncategorized

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: