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USA chemist chain Walgreens goes solar, bigtime

solar-jobAccording to Australian solar provider Energy Matters, if a business is paying more than 20 cents per kilowatt hour for electricity; a commercial solar power system sized to daytime consumption can pay for itself in just a few years – after which, the electricity is essentially free

Walgreens To Add 200+ Solar Power Systems http://www.energymatters.com.au/index.php?main_page=news_article&article_id=3801, 20 June 13,  Walgreens, the USA’s largest chemist store chain, says it will expand rooftop solar installations on its stores from 150 to more than 350.

With over 8,000 stores nationally plus distribution centers, Walgreens has substantial rooftop real estate; some of which it is putting to good use in harvesting power from the sun. The company started taking on solar panel projects in 2007.
According to the company, the addition of the 200-plus rooftop solar power systems will generate an estimated 13.5 million kilowatt hours annually, enough to meet the energy needs of around 1,400 households.

Part of the rollout will include 850 solar panels installed on the Walgreens net-zero energy, LEED Platinum store in Evanston, Illinois.

Walgreens will host the solar panel arrays and SoCore Energy will own, operate, and maintain the systems.

Among Walgreens’ other renewables efforts is a store in Oak Park, Illinois that uses geothermal energy and a distribution center in Waxahachie, Texas, that generates wind power.

Walgreens has committed to a 20 percent energy reduction across its chain of stores by 2020.

“Taking care of our environment is another way Walgreens can help people get, stay and live well in the communities we serve,” said Walgreens’ Menno Enters. “Walgreens will continue to strive for leadership in sustainability to create a happier, healthier environment for our customers and the communities we serve.”

While there’s certainly a warm and fuzzy motivator element for businesses to go solar and it can impact positively on customers, solar can also make very good business sense in terms of operational costs.

According to Australian solar provider Energy Matters, if a business is paying more than 20 cents per kilowatt hour for electricity; a commercial solar power system sized to daytime consumption can pay for itself in just a few years – after which, the electricity is essentially free

June 20, 2013 - Posted by | decentralised, USA

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