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America falsified history of nuclear bombs

When informed by the Secretary of War about the plan to drop the atomic bombs, General Dwight Eisenhower, Supreme Allied Commander, said the bomb was “no longer mandatory as a measure to save American lives.” After the war he said, “It wasn’t necessary to hit them with that awful thing.”

The Nuclear Gang Rides On, Counter Punch, Saul Landau, 2 Oct 10 “……History classes from grade school up do not often emphasize the fact that the United States ended the war in the Pacific by dropping two nuclear bombs on Japanese cities, which killed several hundred thousand civilians and left disease and destruction in their wakes.

When informed by the Secretary of War about the plan to drop the atomic bombs, General Dwight Eisenhower, Supreme Allied Commander, said the bomb was “no longer mandatory as a measure to save American lives.” After the war he said, “It wasn’t necessary to hit them with that awful thing.”

We celebrate. We learned that the gutsy President Truman saved lots of American lives that would have been lost in an invasion of Japan. We don’t learn in most history classes that Admiral William Leahy, President Truman’s Chief” of Staff, later called the bomb a “barbarous weapon” that was unnecessary. Leahy explained. “The Japanese were already defeated and ready to surrender… In being the first to use it, we … adopted an ethical standard common to the barbarians of the Dark Ages.” (The Decision to Use the Atomic Bomb, Vintage 1996)

Few Americans have a clear memory of our nuclear history — part of our heritage, just like the cruel deeds of 9/1//01.

In December 1945, radiation sickness gripped tens of thousands in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Top U.S. policy mavens nevertheless decided to conduct more nuclear “tests” — in Nevada and Bikini (yes, like the skimpy bathing suit).

In early 1946, a U.S. military governor of that atoll in the south Pacific informed the natives their home would become a test site for nuclear bombs — for the purpose of making a contribution to world peace.

Bikini residents sailed to another island. Don’t worry, the U.S. spokesmen assured them, within months you can return; everything will be the same.

For the next twelve years, the U.S. “tested” 67 nuclear weapons in the Marshall Island zone. In 1954, they exploded a hydrogen bomb “with power equivalent to 1,000 Hiroshima bombs.” (Peter Cohen, In These Times October 2010)

The fallout from the tests oozed over islands in a 7,000 square mile area. Rongelap or Rongerik don’t appear on tourist vacation maps. Radiation had saturated the palms, beaches, and lush vegetation along with people. Some of the radioactive venom “reached Australia, India and Japan.” (Cohen)

Decades later, some islanders testified at the International Court of Justice (The Hague) and revealed details of our common heritage, U.S. “tests” killed and sickened people in a US Trust Territory in which Washington “intended to promote the welfare of the native inhabitants.” (Cohen)

The testimony offered details of “jellyfish babies” born without bones or “purple grape babies.” My friend Paul Jacobs reported similar horrors in the 1970s. He traveled to the Nevada Test Site and told of the damage caused by fallout when winds blew radioactive particles over southern Utah and northern Arizona. (“Clouds Over Nevada,” The Reporter May 16, 1957)

“Testing” is also part of U.S. heritage, along with the distinction of being the only nation to use nuclear weapons. Over decades, hundreds of thousands have died from those war and peace tests, yet “security experts” continue to demand more testing; even environmentalists promote nuclear energy as “clean.” Have they forgotten? Or are they ghouls? The nuclear gang has enjoyed more lives than the proverbial cat.

“Paul Jacobs and the Nuclear Gang,” by Jack Willis and Saul Landau, won an Emmy in 1980.   Saul Landau: The Nuclear Gang Rides On

October 2, 2010 - Posted by | history, secrets,lies and civil liberties, USA

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