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Rapid growth in solar and wind power in UK

MORE than 10,000 megawatts per hour of renewable energy were produced in
Southampton last year. Figures from the Department for Business, Energy and
Industrial Strategy show 16,730 megawatts per hour (around 17 gigawatts) of
renewable electricity were generated in Southampton in 2020. This was 10%
more energy than the 15 GWh produced the year before, and 23% more than the
amount produced in 2014 – the earliest year of data available.

Across the UK, 134,600 GWh of renewable energy was generated in 2020, a 13% rise on
the year before, and above the 9% increase from 2018 to 2019. Climate think
tank Ember said huge falls in costs means the growth in offshore wind power
is set to go “parabolic” in the coming months.

Phil MacDonald, chief operating officer at the organisation, added: “But the Government is still
missing the opportunity of cheap onshore wind, and not doing enough to
explore earlier-stage technologies like geothermal and tidal. The biggest
producer of energy in Southampton last year was solar power, which
generated 10 GWh – 62% of the total.

 Daily Echo 8th Nov 2021

 https://www.dailyecho.co.uk/news/19700736.figures-renewable-energy-produced-southampton-yearly/

November 9, 2021 - Posted by | renewable, UK

1 Comment »

  1. That’s very nice, although as many researchers point out, it means far less about the UK’s climate emissions than at first glance. As for people like me – living on Universal Credit which gives my private landlord £325 a month for doing nothing at all – we are stuck paying private energy corporations for this allegedly free and bountiful renewable energy from the wind and the sun. I would love to have my own solar panels on the roof. It’s not going to happen without public funds which are clearly not forthcoming from an austerity-obsessed Tory regime. Let’s be realistic about renewables, not glib and starry-eyed. They are necessary but come with their own costs to the environment, societies and consumers.

    Comment by John Smith | November 9, 2021 | Reply


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