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Scandal of radioactive particles on Britain’s beaches

Radiation Free Lakeland 24th July 2018 , An urgent request has been sent to Sellafield to monitor and retrieve
radioactive particles from St bees beach ahead of Cumbria Wildlife
Trust”s ‘Beached Art’ day. Sellafield have treated this
straightforward request under Freedom of Information rules which means that
there will not be a reply for at least a month and then we may have to pay
for the request to be answered.

The request has been sparked by a citizen
science project carried out by Radiation Free Lakeland volunteers in
collaboration with nuclear science undergraduates at Worcester Polytechnic
Institute in the US. The accuracy of the independent report has been
confirmed by the Environment Agency (letter from EA below on original ) . Marianne
Birkby of RaFL says “the EA recognise the accuracy of our citizen science
project and the accuracy of the students work, but they fail to acknowledge
that our samples were taken without the use of expensive detecting (or any)
equipment,

Also plutonium was not tested for, so this report while accurate
does not reveal the full picture. This means that the volume and
viciousness of radioactive particles being washed onto our beaches is far
greater than is being admitted to. It also means the likelihood of
inhalation and ingestion of particles by beach users is far greater than
“low.” Cumbria Wildlife Trust and other beach users have faith in the
authorities when they say the beaches are safe. This faith is misplaced.

The nuclear waste scandal has been going on for decades polluting our
beautiful beaches with insidious radioactive particles and it will continue
unabated unless people square up to the nuclear industry and say enough is
enough”
https://mariannewildart.wordpress.com/2018/07/24/radioactive-sand-sculptures-by-cumbria-wildlife-trust/

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July 27, 2018 - Posted by | environment, UK

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