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Hold Onto Your Hat! Texas Wind Turbines Produce More Electricity Than Its 4 Nuclear Reactors (2 Nuclear Power Stations)

Mining Awareness +


Texas Power Stations (and Hurricane Harvey) – map below. Wind Farms are indicated by the grey wind sign and the purple and white signs are the two nuclear power stations – with two nuclear reactors each, i.e. a total of four large reactors.

https://www.eia.gov/special/disruptions/ [Update: They appear to have removed many of the layer functions. They can be found here without storm info: https://www.eia.gov/state/maps.php ]
From EIA.gov energy analysis of Texas:
QUICK FACTS
* Texas was the leading crude oil-producing state in the nation in 2015 and exceeded production levels even from the federal offshore areas.
* As of January 2016, the 29 petroleum refineries in Texas had a capacity of over 5.4 million barrels of crude oil per day and accounted for 30% of total U.S. refining capacity.
* Texas accounted for over 27% of U.S. marketed natural gas production in 2015, making it the leading natural gas…

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August 27, 2017 - Posted by | Uncategorized

6 Comments »

  1. Having trouble spotting the reactors. Can you tell me what city or boundary they are near. Thank you.

    Comment by GarryRogers | August 27, 2017 | Reply

    • 2 Plants 4 Reactors:
      Comanche Peak Unit 1, Unit 2 The Comanche Peak power plant is located in Somervell County.
      South Texas Project Unit 1, Unit 2 The South Texas Project (STP) is located in Matagorda County between Bay City and Palacios. https://www.eia.gov/nuclear/state/texas/

      Comment by Christina MacPherson | August 28, 2017 | Reply

      • Thank you.

        Comment by GarryRogers | August 28, 2017

      • Looks like Harvey came ashore pretty close to the STP plant. Let’s hope the 130-mile per hour winds caused no damage.

        Comment by GarryRogers | August 28, 2017

      • I don’t know much about it. But I am thinking that for nuclear reactors, the risk of flooding is a bigger danger. Then, in a heat wave, there are the problems of cooling water. They have sometimes (France I think) had to be shut because their cooling water discharge would have big effect on the river, or local sea area. Far from nuclear reactors being the cure for climate change – climate change could become the doom for nuclear reactors.

        Comment by Christina MacPherson | August 28, 2017

      • Thank you.

        Comment by GarryRogers | August 28, 2017


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