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World Nuclear Power Reactors & Uranium Requirements

3 May 2013

http://www.world-nuclear.org/info/Facts-and-Figures/World-Nuclear-Power-Reactors-and-Uranium-Requirements/#.UYjmc9dx0xB

This table includes only those future reactors envisaged in specific plans and proposals and expected to be operating by 2030.

The WNA country profiles linked to this table cover both areas: near-term developments and the prospective long-term role for nuclear power in national energy policies. They also provide more detail of what is tabulated here. (Click on picture to enlarge)

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Reactor data: WNA to 3/5/13 (excluding 8 shut-down German units)
IAEA- for nuclear electricity production & percentage of electricity (% e) 13/4/12.
WNA: Global Nuclear Fuel Market report Sept 2011 (reference scenario) – for U.

Operable = Connected to the grid;
Under Construction = first concrete for reactor poured, or major refurbishment under way;
Planned = Approvals, funding or major commitment in place, mostly expected in operation within 8-10 years;
Proposed = Specific program or site proposals, expected operation mostly within 15 years.

New plants coming on line are largely balanced by old plants being retired. Over 1996-2009, 43 reactors were retired as 49 started operation. There are no firm projections for retirements over the period covered by this Table, but WNA estimates that at least 60 of those now operating will close by 2030, most being small plants. The 2011 WNA Market Report reference case has 156 reactors closing by 2030, and 298 new ones coming on line.

TWh = Terawatt-hours (billion kilowatt-hours), MWe = Megawatt (electrical as distinct from thermal), kWh = kilowatt-hour.

66,512 tU = 78,438 t U3O8

** The world total includes 6 reactors operating on Taiwan with a combined capacity of 4927 MWe, which generated a total of 40.4 billion kWh in 2011 (accounting for 19.0% of Taiwan’s total electricity generation). Taiwan has two reactors under construction with a combined capacity of 2700 MWe, and one proposed, 1350 MWe. It is expected to require 1291 tU in 2013.

Note: This table is routinely updated approximately every two months, and more frequently as required.
Earlier tables on link

May 7, 2013 - Posted by | Uncategorized

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