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Nuclear power’s future not as bright as they say!

nuclear
power is like building an outhouse without putting a hole under it –
there is no place for the waste to go.

 Accidents will continue to occur,
especially as older plants are being refurbished. Costs are high.
Builds and repairs, refurbishment and refuelling cannot be completed
within – or even close to – estimated times, and accidents are
devastating.

Wishful thinking on nuclear power
By Dr. Dale Dewar, The StarPhoenix, December 21, 2012 Dewar is
executive director of the group Physicians for Global Survival.

highly-recommendedIn the article Cameco CEO bullish on nuclear future (SP, Nov. 30), Tim
Gitzel presents a report of the nuclear industry that is very much at
odds with the World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2012 and the
International Atomic Energy Agency.

While Cameco’s chief executive is well paid to sell the industry,
apparently being factual is unnecessary.

The authors of the World Nuclear Industry Status Report are not
particularly friendly to the nuclear industry, but neither are they a
bunch of rabid antinuclear environmentalists. They simply tell it like
it is. The IAEA promotes and licenses the nuclear industry worldwide.
Gitzel says there will be 80 new nuclear reactors online in 2021. To
make that a reality, there would need to be a lot more groundbreaking
today. Of the 59 reactors currently listed as being under
construction, nine have been on the list for more than 20 years, four
for 10 years and, according to the IAEA, 43 are not yet close to an
official startup date.

Some of Gitzel’s figures are wishful thinking. He says that four new
plants are being built in the United States. In fact, there are no new
plants being built south of the border. In addition to U.S.
cancellations, Brazil, France and India have cancelled their new
builds and the Netherlands may follow suit.

And China may want to have 26 under construction, but not a single
construction site has yet been opened. Constructions in Bulgaria and
Japan have been abandoned, and the Finnish Okiiluoto 3 site is so
delayed and so far over-budget that it is in jeopardy.

The nuclear industry has been its own worst enemy.
An industry born in the secrecy of the Manhattan Project, building the
nuclear bomb in the 1940s, it has continued to operate largely behind
closed doors. Power plant construction has been highly government
subsidized, consistently subjected to lengthy technical delays and
always massively overbudget.

Adding to this litany of faults is the failure of the industry to
convince any insurance agency to cover its liabilities in the case of
an accident.

When things go wrong – as they did at Three Mile Island, Chornobyl and
Fukushima – they go really wrong. The toll to human lives and the
environment is astronomical, cleanup impossible, and financial costs
beyond belief. The radiation that boils the water that creates the
power is messy.

It gradually destroys pipes and containment vessels, and finally clogs
up the fuel itself.

Seventy years of wishing (and trying) has not harnessed the atom or
even come close. It cannot even be contained. Furthermore, nuclear
power is like building an outhouse without putting a hole under it –
there is no place for the waste to go.
Each previous accident resulted from entirely different sequences of
human and technical failures. Accidents will continue to occur,
especially as older plants are being refurbished. Costs are high.
Builds and repairs, refurbishment and refuelling cannot be completed
within – or even close to – estimated times, and accidents are
devastating.  http://www.thestarphoenix.com/news/Wishful+thinking+nuclear+power/7729997/story.html#ixzz2Fnuq53yZ

December 22, 2012 - Posted by | Uncategorized

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