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6th June- world premiere of movie ‘The Beginning of the End of Nuclear Weapons’

Beyond Nuclear 2nd June 2019 , At 7pm, on the 6thof June, at the Village East Cinema, in Lower Manhattan,
Pressenza International Press Agency, of which I am a co-director, will
host the World Premiere of our new documentary on the Treaty to Prohibit
Nuclear Weapons.

The title, The Beginning of the End of Nuclear Weapons, is
a reference to the speech made by Setsuko Thurlow to the assembled throng
of dignitaries and International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear weapons (ICAN)
campaigners, during her Nobel Laureate Speech in December 2017 when the
Peace Prize was awarded to ICAN. The film charts the story of the
development of the atomic bomb through to the negotiations to prohibit
nuclear weapons, and is told through the interventions of 14 people whose
roles have been key in the fields of activism and diplomacy.

https://beyondnuclearinternational.org/2019/06/02/the-beginning-of-the-end-of-nuclear-weapons/

June 4, 2019 Posted by | ACTION, media, Resources -audiovicual, USA | Leave a comment

Accuracy of HBO’s “Chernobyl” mini series

“Chernobyl” the Mini-Series Faithfully Recreates the World’s Worst Nuclear Disaster   https://interestingengineering.com/chernobyl-the-mini-series-faithfully-recreates-the-worlds-worst-nuclear-disaster

HBO and Sky’s mini-series “Chernobyl” is a faithful retelling of the events of April 1986, when the world stood on the brink of disaster……..

An eye-opening retelling

Mazin said that Chernobyl arose out of his interest in writing something that addressed the fact that, “We are struggling with the global war on the truth.” For each episode, Mazin has created a podcast that can be found on Youtube.

For those who don’t know much about the disaster, the series is an eye-opener. For those who do know what happened, the series is a near-perfect recreation of the events that took place in Soviet Ukraine on the morning of April 27, 1986.

Researching for the truth

To create the series, Mazin consulted many different kinds of sources, “from government reports to first person accounts to scientific journals to historical works, photo essays.” And, he worked hard to avoid putting false drama into his scripts because as he said, “So much of what happens in the show is just shocking. It’s shocking to believe that that’s what happened.

Well, our feeling was if we started pushing the envelope on those things then we would diminish the impact of all the things that we were accurate about, so we stayed as accurate as we could.”

Location scouting for Soviet-era environment

The producers recreated Pripyat, the closest town to the disaster, in Fabijoniškės, a residential district of Vilnius, Lithuania. It retains an authentic Soviet atmosphere, and was used in the scenes where Pripyat is evacuated.

A twin to Chernobyl’s Reactor No. 4 was found at the decommissioned Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant at Visaginas, Lithuania. It was used for both exterior and interior shots. Ignalina is also a RBMK nuclear power reactor, the same type as the doomed Chernobyl Reactor No. 4. Several final scenes of the series were shot in Ukraine.

Public Response

The public’s response to Chernobyl has been overwhelmingly positive. The series has a 96 percent approval rating on Rotten TomatoesThe critical consensus on the site says, “Chernobyl rivets with a creeping dread that never dissipates, dramatizing a national tragedy with sterling craft and an intelligent dissection of institutional rot.”

In his review in The Washington Post, Hank Stuever described the series as an “effective, no-nonsense and highly researched dramatization …” and said that it is “committed to a disciplined, truthful and scientific account.”

On the site Metacritic, based on 26 critics, Chernobyl has a weighted average score of 83 out of 100, indicating “universal acclaim”.

In her article in The Atlantic Sophie Gilbert says of the series, “Whether you apply its message to climate change, the ‘alternative facts’ administration of the current moment, or anti-vaccine screeds on Facebook, Mazin’s moral stands: The truth will eventually come out.”

June 3, 2019 Posted by | media, Resources -audiovicual | Leave a comment

Breathtaking series on Chernobyl nuclear catastrophe


(
Foxtel Showcase 12 June 8.30 pm and 10.30 pm)

Chernobyl: horrifying, masterly television that sears on to your brain. This breathtaking series throws us right into the hellish chaos of the nuclear disaster – and its terrors are unflinching and unforgettable, Guardian, Rebecca Nicholson,  29 May 2019 After three of its five episodes aired, the miniseries Chernobyl found its way to the top of IMDB’s top 250 TV shows in history list. While the fan-voted chart might seem hyperbolic, given that the drama had only just crossed the halfway point, it is not undeserving of the honour. Chernobyl is masterful television, as stunning as it is gripping, and it is relentless in its awful tension, refusing to let go even for a second. That old ‘don’t spoil the ending’ joke about Titanic will inevitably be rebooted here, but it is confident enough to withstand any familiarity with the story.

May 30, 2019 Posted by | Belarus, incidents, Resources -audiovicual, Ukraine | Leave a comment

Rivetting new documentary series on the Chernobyl nuclear catastrophe

Chernobyl (2019) | What Is Chernobyl? | HBO

May 4, 2019 Posted by | Resources -audiovicual | Leave a comment

New miniseries dramatises the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear disaster

Irish Times 30th April 2019 A new five-part miniseries dramatising the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear explosion will bring “fresh eyes” to the disaster and its subsequent cover-up,
Chernobyl activist Adi Roche said at a screening of the drama in Dublin on
Tuesday.

Ms Roche said she hoped the series, named Chernobyl and made by
Sky in association with US broadcaster HBO, “wins every award going”
for its portrayal of the tragedy and those caught up in it. “Disasters
like Chernobyl can fade from the headlines, can fade from societal
consciousness, can fade from the memories of ordinary people,” Ms Roche
said.

“This series will reveal to a new global TV audience the ignominy,
the betrayal and the heroism behind the deadliest nuclear accident in human
history.”

https://www.irishtimes.com/business/media-and-marketing/chernobyl-tv-drama-will-bring-new-light-to-1986-nuclear-disaster-says-adi-roche-1.3876520

May 2, 2019 Posted by | Resources -audiovicual | Leave a comment

Podcast: The Nuclear History Of Chernobyl With Kate Brown

The Nuclear History Of Chernobyl With Kate Brown  https://www.wortfm.org/the-nuclear-history-of-chernobyl-with-kate-brown/

APRIL 29, 2019 BY A PUBLIC AFFAIR Thirty-three years ago, on April 26, 1986, the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in northern Ukraine experienced two explosions and a fire that released deadly levels of radioactive gas and ash. This event is widely considered the most disastrous nuclear power plant accident in history.

Historian Kate Brown says that “much of what we’re told about the Chernobyl disaster and its after-effects is incomplete or incorrect.” Today, she joins us on the show to share her research of Chernobyl and nuclear history and to discuss her latest book, Manual for Survival: A Chernobyl Guide to the Future. Along the way, she and Patty consider what happens when atomic energy is released; the impact of radiation on the landscape, on animal bodies, and on human bodies; and the environmental and public health consequences of large-scale technological disasters.

Kate Brown is a professor of environmental and nuclear history at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She is the author of A Biography of No Place: From Ethnic Borderland to Soviet Heartland (Harvard, 2004), Plutopia: Nuclear Families in Atomic Cities and the Great Soviet and American Plutonium Disasters (Oxford, 2013), and the recently-published Manual for Survival: A Chernobyl Guide to the Future (W.W. Norton, 2019). She serves as a senior editor of International Labor and Working Class History (ILWCH).

April 30, 2019 Posted by | Resources -audiovicual | Leave a comment

New film shows Japan the story of Japanese fishermen exposed to 1954 nuclear bomb test

U.S. film shines light on Japan boat crew exposed to 1954 nuke test, By Miya Tanaka, KYODO NEWS – Mar 14, 2019 – For many Americans, the story of the Japanese fishing crew who were exposed to a U.S. hydrogen bomb test in the Pacific Ocean 65 years ago may be a footnote in history easy to overlook.

But Keith Reimink, a 40-year-old American documentary filmmaker, reacted differently when he came across in 2014 a tiny paragraph mentioning the incident in a nearly 500-page book criticizing the U.S. management of nuclear weapons.

Little was mentioned except for the fact that the 23 Japanese men aboard the tuna fishing vessel Fukuryu Maru No. 5 suffered radiation poisoning and that one of them died. But the Pittsburgh-based movie director was intrigued, and by the end of the year, his group was already in Japan to film interviews with three of the former fishermen.

Four years on, Reimink’s indie film company released last September in the United States a 75-minute documentary called “Day of the Western Sunrise” that depicts the horror of nuclear weapons through the vivid accounts of the fishermen and flashbacks of the incident presented as animation.

“The vast majority of Americans have not heard about any suffering related to nuclear tests after World War II ended…People need to learn about the legacy of nuclear testing in America so that it doesn’t happen again,” Reimink, who made his debut as a film director in 2012, told Kyodo News when he recently came to Japan for the film’s first public screening in the country……….

The film opens by noting that most people believe that Japan’s experience of nuclear weapons ended with the U.S. atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August 1945.

But another tragedy occurred on March 1, 1954, when the United States conducted its largest-ever nuclear weapons test, code-named Castle Bravo, at the Bikini Atoll in the Marshall Islands. The explosion brought higher levels of fallout than predicted, contaminating the islands and boats sailing in the vicinity.

The three former Fukuryu Maru members recall in the film the moment of the blast that forever changed their lives. As a flash lit up the western sky, one of them shouted, “The sun rises in the west!”

A total of 22 crew members survived the initial illness, but further hardships awaited them. They were shunned by the local community amid rumors that radiation sickness was communicable, sometimes rejected when seeking marriage partners and haunted by fears that the exposure might still affect their health and their offspring as well.

Matashichi Oishi, 85, who has been the most active among the survivors in recounting his experiences in public, talks in the film about his first child being stillborn and deformed, which he kept a secret for a long time. “It could happen to anyone who is exposed to radiation,” he warns………

The footage revealed “personal and intimate” accounts of the fishermen, leading Reimink to think that the film should be “a Japanese story” and that there is “no room for an American opinion.”

As well as insisting on the narrator speaking in Japanese against the advice of many people, Reimink adopted an animation style inspired by Japanese traditional “kamishibai” storytelling that combines hand-drawn visuals with engaging narration.

The use of animation did not just help keep the production cost low, compared with using expensive archival footage, but is also expected to increase the educational potential for children of all ages, including for those who may be too small to understand the whole story but still are able to engage with the pictures……… https://english.kyodonews.net/news/2019/03/d05edfdbdf5b-feature-us-film-shines-light-on-japan-boat-crew-exposed-to-1954-nuke-test.html

March 16, 2019 Posted by | Resources -audiovicual | Leave a comment

Nuclear power is no solution to the climate crisis

Nukes Are No Answer To Climate Crisis RALPH NADER RADIO HOUR https://ralphnaderradiohour.com/nukes-are-no-answer-to-climate-crisis/?fbclid=IwAR1WWrHrMbT0bflR2p7fJDw89KeS_qb1fMSRcAX6ESDXanFL6A2hDNbM8To

February 25, 2019 Posted by | climate change, Resources -audiovicual, USA | Leave a comment

Photographer captures the eerie abandoned Chernobyl exclusion zone

News.com.au 23rd Feb 2019 , Eerie photographs taken recently show how nature is reclaiming an abandoned
town 33 years after the nuclear disaster at Chernobyl. The harrowing
pictures show what is left of the towns of Chernobyl and Pripyat in
Ukraine, with gasmasks scattered about and dolls left abandoned in a day
care centre. Other captivating photos show an abandoned supermarket with a
shopping trolley outside and a rusting bumper car. Dutch photographer Erwin
Zwaan, 47, travelled to the 28-kilometre exclusion zone around Chernobyl in
Northern Ukraine in 2016 and 2018 to photograph the ghostly ruins for his
book Chernobyl – 30+ Years Without Humans. The power plant and nearby town
Pripyat — once home to 50,000 people — remain more or less untouched
three decades after they were evacuated in 1986.

ttps://www.news.com.au/technology/environment/natural-wonders/haunting-photos-show-dozens-of-gas-masks-littering-chernobyl-as-nature-reclaims-nuclear-plant-blast-site/news-story/bb8e136f596b754ddf45430c2366d1e4

February 25, 2019 Posted by | Resources -audiovicual, Ukraine | Leave a comment

Time to jolt people out of their apathy about danger of nuclear war

It’s Time to Face Up to Our Nuclear Reality

The made-for-TV movie The Day After had an enormous impact on America’s national conversation about nuclear weapons in 1983. Resuming that conversation today is essential, and the movie holds some lessons about what that would take. The Nation, By Dawn Stover–  14 Dec 18 This article originally appeared as part of a special section on The Day After at the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists “…….The television movie The Day After depicted a full-scale nuclear war and its impacts on people living in and around Kansas City.

It became something of a community project in picturesque Lawrence, 40 miles west of Kansas City, where much of the movie was filmed. Thousands of local residents—including students and faculty from the University of Kansas—were recruited as extras for the movie; about 65 of the 80 speaking parts were cast locally. The use of locals was intentional, because the moviemakers wanted to show the grim consequences of a nuclear war for real Middle Americans, living in the real middle of the country. By the time the movie ends, almost all of the main characters are dead or dying.

ABC broadcast The Day After on November 20, 1983, with no commercial breaks during the final hour. More than 100 million people saw it—nearly two-thirds of the total viewing audience. It remains one of the most-watched television programs of all time. Brandon Stoddard, then-president of ABC’s motion picture division, called it “the most important movie we’ve ever done.” The Washington Post later described it as “a profound TV moment.” It was arguably the most effective public-service announcement in history.

It was also a turning point for foreign policy. Thirty-five years ago, the United States and the Soviet Union were in a nuclear arms race that had taken them to the brink of war. The Day After was a piercing wake-up shriek, not just for the general public but also for then-President Ronald Reagan. Shortly after he saw the film, Reagan gave a speech saying that he, too, had a dream: that nuclear weapons would be “banished from the face of the Earth.” A few years later, Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev signed the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty, the first agreement that provided for the elimination of an entire category of nuclear weapons. By the late 1990s, American and Russian leaders had created a stable, treaty-based arms-control infrastructure and expected it to continue improving over time.

Now, however, a long era of nuclear restraint appears to be nearing an end. Tensions between the United States and Russia have risen to levels not seen in decades. . Alleging treaty violations by Russia, the White House has announced plans to withdraw from the INF Treaty. Both countries are moving forward with the enormously expensive refurbishment of old and development of new nuclear weapons—a process euphemized as “nuclear modernization.” Leaders on both sides have made inflammatory statements, and no serious negotiations have taken place in recent years.

There are striking parallels between the security situations today and 35 years ago, with one major discordance: Today, nuclear weapons are seldom a front-burner concern, largely being forgotten, underestimated, or ignored by the American public. The United States desperately needs a fresh national conversation about the born-again nuclear-arms race—a conversation loud enough to catch the attention of the White House and the Kremlin and lead to resumed dialogue. A look back at The Day After and the role played by ordinary citizens in a small Midwestern city shows how the risk of nuclear war took center stage in 1983, and what it would take for that to happen again in 2018.

[Article goes on to detail the story]……

It is no coincidence that nuclear war begins in The Day After with a gradually escalating conflict in Europe. In one scene, viewers hear a Soviet official mention the “coordinated movement of the Pershing II launchers.”

The Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty that Reagan and Gorbachev signed in 1987 resolved that conflict, banning all ground-launched and air-launched nuclear and conventional missiles (and their launchers) with ranges between 500 and 5,500 kilometers, or 310 to 3,420 miles. However, Trump said in October that he plans to withdraw from the treaty, and on December 4 Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said the United States would withdraw in 60 days if Russia continues its alleged non-compliance. Gorbachev and Shultz, in a Washington Post op-ed published that day, warned that “[a]bandoning the INF Treaty would be a step toward a new arms race, undermining strategic stability and increasing the threat of miscalculation or technical failure leading to an immensely destructive war.”………

A BRIGHT TOMORROW?

In one scene in The Day After, a pregnant woman who has taken shelter in the Lawrence hospital along with fallout victims tells her doctor that her overdue baby doesn’t want to be born. You’re holding back hope, he says.

“Hope for what?” she asks. “We knew the score. We knew all about bombs. We knew all about fallout. We knew this could happen for 40 years. Nobody was interested.”

It won’t be long before another 40 years have passed. Americans have not yet perished in a nuclear war or its aftermath, but a new arms race is beginning and the potential for an intentional or accidental nuclear war seems to be rising…….. https://www.thenation.com/article/nuclear-weapons-bulletin-atomic-scientists/

December 15, 2018 Posted by | culture and arts, media, Resources -audiovicual | Leave a comment

The Twin Threats of Climate Change and Nuclear Annihilation- new documentary with Noam Chomsky

New Documentary by ChomskySpeaks.org with Noam Chomsky Challenges Establishment over Twin Threats of Climate Change and Nuclear Annihilation https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/new-documentary-by-chomskyspeaksorg-with-noam-chomsky-challenges-establishment-over-twin-threats-of-climate-change-and-nuclear-annihilation-300743226.html

Renowned public intellectual calls out Democrats and Republicans for escalating nuclear dangers and decries Republican Party “dedicated to the destruction of life”  NEWS PROVIDED BY
ChomskySpeaks.org 

Nov 02, 2018 BOSTONNov. 2, 2018 /PRNewswire/ — Executive Producer Randall Wallace and Director Patrick Jerome launch the online documentary, “Noam Chomsky: Internationalism or Extinction” on the website: http://ChomskySpeaks.org. Based on a lecture by the public intellectual who is often described as the “most quoted living intellectual,” the documentary brings both the activist energy and desperate concerns of climate change and nuclear escalation that are causing mass extinctions.

Against these dire realities, Noam Chomsky surveys “the internationalism” of inter-state cooperation and social movements as solutions. He notes the complicity of both Democratic and Republican parties in escalating nuclear tensions and nuclear proliferation.  At the same time, he condemns the Republican Party for profit-driven policies leading to climate-altering, carbon pollution. The documentary is a compelling and urgent warning explaining such ideas and tools as “the Anthropocene,” “the Doomsday Clock,” “species extinction,” “internationalism,” “denialism,” “non-proliferation,” “NATO expansion,” “climate accords,” and “climate debt” among many others.

Many non-partisan organizations collaborated in organizing the original lecture upon which the documentary is based; several also supported the production of the documentary as a starting point for further analysis. These included peace movement organizations in collaboration with the Boston-based movement-building center, encuentro5 (http://encuentro5.org) and the democracy movement’s Liberty Tree Foundation for the Democratic Revolution (http://LibertyTreeFoundation.org). The video adds to their efforts at expanding the public conversation about vital issues of the day. A grant from the Wallace Action Fund supported the documentary.

Chomsky concludes his lecture with sober reflection on the urgent challenges facing humanity: “The tasks ahead are daunting and they cannot be deferred.” Media Contact:

Suren Moodliar 
617-968-0880 
204337@email4pr.com   SOURCE ChomskySpeaks.org, Related Links   http://chomskyspeaks.org

November 5, 2018 Posted by | climate change, politics, Resources -audiovicual, USA, weapons and war | Leave a comment

Radioactive Contamination – podcast

Ocean Radioactivity Transfer to Land, Food, People: UK Marine Pollution
Expert Tim Deere-Jones.    Nuclear Hotseat 3rd Oct 2018 
http://nuclearhotseat.com/2018/10/03/ocean-radioactivity-transfer-land-food-people-uk-marine-pollution-expert-tim-deere-jones-nh-380/

October 22, 2018 Posted by | Resources -audiovicual | Leave a comment

The Low Level Radiation and Health Conference

Rik Garfit-Mottram 26th Aug 2018 The Low Level Radiation and Health Conference was set up in 1985 by members
of the public keen to find out more about these issues. Since its
inception, the conference has invited those carrying out research to
present their findings in an accessible way to members of the public and
those with an interest.

Thanks to Professor Carmel Mothersill we were able
to run on our event from one she organised for the International Union of
Radioecologists and kindly some of the IUR speakers stayed on to present.
In addition, Rik offered to film the entire event.

The first video has links to another 9:

  • Wildlife impacts: Recent findings concerning germline
    mutations in bugs and humans, Prof Tim Mousseau, University of South;
  • Biological effects of long-term chronic exposure: a case study on Scots
    pine populations around Chernobyl, Prof Stanislav Geras’kin, Head of
    Laboratory of Plant Radiobiology and Ecotoxicology from the Russian
    Institute of Radiology and Agroecology;
  • Organ damage from exposure to
    infrasound, Prof. Mariana Alves Pereira. She worked with the chief medical
    officer for the Portuguese Aeronautical Industry;
  • Gender Matters in the
    Atomic Age, Mary Olson, US Nuclear Information + Resource Service, NIRS.
  • Update on the situation with nuclear power in the USA. Mary Olsen, Nuclear
    Information and Resource Service.
  • Radiation Monitoring in the USA. Tim
    Mousseau, University of South Carolina. The Welsh Connection. John
    Urquhart. The ARGUS Monitoring Project. Graham Denman
  • Fracking and Waste
    Water Treatment in the UK. John Busby, Dr Ian Fairlie, given by Jill
    Sutcliffe.
  • Video 1 Chair: Prof David Copplestone, University of Stirling
    Alice Stewart1 Lecture, Biophotons. Prof. Carmel Mothersill, McMaster
    University, Canada.https://youtu.be/K2mmfiXpM6s

October 18, 2018 Posted by | Resources -audiovicual | Leave a comment

“Nuclear Savage: The Islands of Secret Project 4.1”- SANTA FE INDEPENDENT FILM FESTIVAL 2018

SANTA FE INDEPENDENT FILM FESTIVAL 2018

“Nuclear Savage: The Islands of Secret Project 4.1” and “Atomic Artist” Pasatiempo, Michael Abatemarco

      Oct 12, 2018

NUCLEAR SAVAGE: THE ISLANDS

    OF SECRET PROJECT 4.1  

      Documentary, not rated, 87 minutes

    ATOMIC ARTIST  Short documentary, not rated, 27 minutes

    Santa Fe’s own Adam Horowitz, producer, writer, and director of Nuclear Savage, begins this unsettling documentary on secret radiation experiments conducted on Pacific Islanders with a brief history of the Marshall Islands, from the first European contact there to the devastating tests on Bikini Atoll starting in 1946. Early in the film, footage is shown of the Castle Bravo detonation over the atoll, a 15-megaton hydrogen blast that, in addition to its deleterious impact on the environment, took an immediate and lasting toll on the health of human populations. In the 12 years after that first test, the U.S. government detonated nearly two dozen such devices in the area. That number increased to 67 by the end of the Cold War. The race to remain ahead of the Soviets in the development of nuclear weapons became the justification for denying the islanders the privilege of their humanity, with government officials choosing instead to regard them as simple savages.

    Parts of the islands remain uninhabitable, their residents unable to return to their homes due to high levels of radiation. They live in squalor on other islands, displaced by the thousands. The Marshallese government official in charge of foreign affairs from 2008 to 2009, when the film was in production, calls for greater scrutiny of U.S. documents that were declassified in 1993. These files lend weight to suspicions of cover-ups on the part of the American government concerning the deliberate radiation poisoning of island inhabitants. Horowitz presents credible evidence and does a fine job tying information that’s been available to the public for years with new information gleaned from the government’s Project 4.1, strongly implicating it as a top-secret operation to study radiation effects on unwitting subjects.

    It’s hard to refute the eyewitness testimony recounted in the documentary. One islander, a middle-aged woman, states plainly and wistfully, “They wanted to find out what would happen to us from the bomb. They used us as human experiments.” Video footage is shown of islanders from Rongelap Atoll who were exposed to heavy fallout from the Bravo blast and suffered severe radiation burns. No action was taken to see that the several hundred inhabitants of Rongelap were evacuated before the test. Young children were born with deformities or cancer, people’s hair fell out, and islanders began dying of cancer at alarming rates.

    Nuclear Savage is compelling, disturbing, thought-provoking filmmaking, in which Horowitz contrasts the idyllic music and customs of the islanders with footage of horrific events. Funded by Pacific Islanders in Communications, a public broadcasting company that provides programming to PBS, Nuclear Savage is a damning look at America’s presence in the Marshall Islands, and is an important, timely documentary. The film has won numerous awards at international festivals, including several jury prizes, and was an official selection at the Film Society of Lincoln Center in New York. An official screening was sponsored by the United Nations in 2015 in conjunction with nuclear nonproliferation hearings…………

    Jean Cocteau Cinema; “Atomic Artist” precedes “Nuclear Savage” at 1:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 20. Screenings include Q&As with the filmmakers.  http://www.santafenewmexican.com/pasatiempo/movies/nuclear-savage-the-islands-of-secret-project-and-atomic-artist/article_744df6d9-bfa7-5c2

    October 13, 2018 Posted by | environment, OCEANIA, Resources -audiovicual | Leave a comment

    French film docuementary – “Nuclear power – the end of a myth”

    Public Senat 22nd Sept 2018 By 2028, 34 of the 58 reactors will be celebrating their fortieth
    anniversary, the maximum operating age set during the construction of the
    park. EDF over-indebted does not have the means to replace these reactors
    at the end of their life.

    This film tells how France, by political choice,
    became totally dependent on nuclear energy until it got into a dangerous
    impasse. This film also shows that, at the same time as the aging of
    nuclear power plants, several strategic dams at EDF are showing some
    worrying signs of weakness.

    Who were the players in this nuclear power
    strategy? How was it imposed behind the scenes of the State, what were the
    key moments? What are the real reasons and risks today for extending the
    life of the fleet in operation? A rigorous investigation at the heart of
    the French nuclear machine with the testimonies of the various actors of
    the sector.
    https://www.publicsenat.fr/emission/documentaires/nucleaire-la-fin-d-un-mythe-132557

     


    Liberation 21st Sept 2018, [Machine Translation]
    The utopia of French nuclear energy dismantled, from
    the “Messmer plan” to the EPR. Public Senate broadcasts this Saturday night
    “Nuclear, the end of a myth”, a new docu supported on the flaws of the atom
    industry. A useful light at a time when the government must decide on the
    future of its reactors. The demolition of the French nuclear “model” and
    its national narrative has become a popular subject. After the Big Lie seen
    on Arte (who attacked the taboo of an attack on power plants) and Impasse
    broadcast by France 5 (which told how the damn shipyard EPR reactor is
    “sinking” EDF), here is Nuclear, the end of a myth, that we can discover
    this Saturday at 9 pm on Public Senate.
    https://www.liberation.fr/france/2018/09/21/l-utopie-du-nucleaire-francais-demantelee-du-plan-messmer-a-l-epr_1680417

    September 26, 2018 Posted by | France, Resources -audiovicual | Leave a comment