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Japan’s Onagawa nuclear reactor No 1 to be scrapped

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October 29, 2018 Posted by | business and costs, Japan | Leave a comment

“Clean Energy D.C. Act” – would lead Washington DC to 100% renewable energy by 2032

Green Matters 24th Oct 2018, Lawmakers in Washington D.C. are proposing one of the nation’s most
aggressive plans to cut carbon emissions. The “Clean Energy D.C. Act”
would roll out the strongest renewable electricity standard in the United
States, making the nation’s capital a world leader on climate change and
put them on an accelerated timeline to 100 percent renewable energy by
2032.

“This bill provides the bold action needed to match the urgency of
the climate crisis. It builds on the Clean Energy D.C. plan and the
District’s 12-year legacy of clean energy and green building policy
achievement, again blazing a path for other cities to follow,” said Cliff
Majersik, Executive Director of the Institute for Market Transformation in
a statement.  https://www.greenmatters.com/renewables/2018/10/24/19LG2w/dc-climate-bill-2030

October 29, 2018 Posted by | renewable | 1 Comment

Egypt’s renewable energy project – going for the green economy

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Middle East Monitor 27th Oct 2018 , Egypt is “entering the world of solar energy” after it inaugurated the
largest solar power plant in the world early this year, RT reported on Friday. Reporting the remarks of Egyptian official Hassan Abaza, RT said that the superpower plant was built in the city of Aswan, southern Egypt.
It began supplying the national grid last December. Abaza reiterated that this is the largest solar power plant in the world, noting that his country is heading towards more investment in this kind of power as part of its plans for sustainable development.
He also said that solar power energy is better than oil because it is renewable, stressing that the “green
economy” is a mechanism to achieve sustainable development.   https://www.middleeastmonitor.com/20181027-egypt-builds-largest-solar-power-plant-in-the-world/

October 29, 2018 Posted by | Egypt, renewable | 1 Comment

UK Law changed so nuclear waste dumps can be forced on local communities

October 29, 2018 Posted by | politics, UK, wastes | Leave a comment

Energy Secretary Rick Perry and Donald Trump saying different things about Yucca nuclear waste dump plan

Energy Secretary Says White House Still Backs Nevada Nuke Dump, Financial Express, By: Bloomberg  October 27, 2018

Energy Secretary Rick Perry said the White House still supports construction of a planned repository for nuclear waste in Nevada, despite President Donald Trump’s suggestion over the weekend that he was reconsidering.

When asked if the Trump administration still supports Yucca Mountain, Perry swiftly said “Yes.”

“I’m making this presumption by looking at a budgeting process and there was money in the president’s budget to manage Yucca,” Perry said, after giving remarks at the department’s Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, New York. Trump requested $120 million in his budget proposal for the geologic repository 90 miles north of Las Vegas.

……….Trump told a Nevada television station he was reconsidering his support after campaigning last weekend with Senator Dean Heller, an embattled Republican senator who opposes the project and is in a tight re-election battle.

“I think you should do things where people want them to happen, so I would be very inclined to be against it,” Trump said in Oct. 20 interview with KRNV-News 4. “We will be looking at it very seriously over the next few weeks, and I agree with the people of Nevada.”…….. https://www.financialexpress.com/world-news/energy-secretary-says-white-house-still-backs-nevada-nuke-dump/1363704/

 

October 29, 2018 Posted by | politics, USA, wastes | Leave a comment

USA’s subsidy to coal and nuclear power stalled, but still a possibility

October 29, 2018 Posted by | politics, USA | Leave a comment

Despite health dangers, Japan is sending residents back to irradiated Fukushima areas

October 29, 2018 Posted by | general | Leave a comment

Taiwan’s phaseout of nuclear power

Taiwan on right rack to phase out nuclear power: German envoy, Focus Taiwan, 2018/10/28 Taipei, Oct. 28 (CNA) By Joseph Yeh Taiwan’s government is on the right track to install more capacity for renewable energy as it moves toward phasing out nuclear power by 2025, Germany’s new top envoy to Taiwan told CNA during a recent interview.

During an interview conducted on Wednesday, Thomas Prinz, the new director general of German Institute Taipei, told CNA that based on his understanding, the Taiwan government’s plan to substitute nuclear energy is “very realistic and can be achieved.”

The German government decided to close down all the country’s nuclear power stations in the wake of the Fukushima accident in Japan on March 11, 2011, when the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear plant was hit by a tsunami after a magnitude 9 earthquake knocked out power to its cooling systems sending its reactors into meltdown.

“However, it is not only the decommissioning which is interesting, when you shut down nuke plants you have to find other sources of energy. That is where your government is so far on the right track to install more capacity for renewable energy,” he added.

Saying that Germany was the first country in the world to embrace renewable energy and seek to shut down fossil fuel energy, Prinz said 36 percent of energy in Germany is now generated by renewable sources…..
“So we have certain experience and that opens up a lot of possibilities for cooperation with the Taiwanese government,” he added. ………

President Tsai Ing-wen’s (蔡英文) administration has set itself the goal of phasing out nuclear energy in Taiwan by 2025. An amendment to the Electricity Act was approved by the Legislative Yuan on Jan. 11, 2017 requiring all nuclear power operations to end by 2025.

Meanwhile, Prinz said Germany has set a goal of reaching 65 percent of power generation by renewables in 2030…….. http://focustaiwan.tw/news/aeco/201810280009.aspx

October 29, 2018 Posted by | politics, Taiwan | Leave a comment

Russia preparing to discuss Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty with USA

Lavrov Says Moscow Preparing Answers To U.S. Nuclear-Treaty Concerns, Radio Free Europe, 28 Oct 18 Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov has said Moscow was drafting responses to a list of questions recently presented by the United States concerning a key Cold War-era arms control treaty.Lavrov made the comments on October 28, days after President Donald Trump announced that the United States would withdraw from the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty, repeating longstanding U.S. accusations that Moscow had violated the agreement.

The 1987 accord prohibits the United States and Russia from possessing, producing, or deploying ground-launched cruise and ballistic missiles with a range of between 500 and 5,000 kilometers.

“Just a week ago, a couple of days before they announced their intention to withdraw from the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty, the Americans via their embassy in Moscow sent the Russian Foreign Ministry an extensive list of questions which are a concern to them,” Lavrov said in an interview aired on Russian television.

“It is better to come to terms with Russia on an equal basis and it is not necessary to be friends,” the Russian minister also said. “We are not forcing a friendship.”………

START Under Threat?

In the wake of U.S. threats to withdraw from the INF Treaty, Lavrov said that the “fate of the New START Treaty is unclear.”

The New START Treaty limits strategic nuclear weapons. It was signed in 2010 and is due to expire in 2021, although the two sides could agree to extend it for another five years.

Russian President Vladimir Putin has warned that Washington’s withdrawal from the INF Treaty could lead to a new “arms race.”

Meanwhile, European members of NATO have urged Washington to try to bring Russia back into compliance with the nuclear arms control agreement rather than quitting it, diplomats say.

Speaking on October 28, U.S. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said the United States was in consultation with its European allies on the INF Treaty.

When asked whether he could rule out placing intermediate-range missiles on the ground if Washington left the INF Treaty, Mattis told reporters travelling with him to Prague, “I never rule things out like that, I also don’t rule it in.” ………https://www.rferl.org/a/lavrov-says-moscow-preparing-answers-to-u-s-inf-concerns/29568360.html

October 29, 2018 Posted by | politics international, Russia, USA | Leave a comment

America’s decision to abandon arms control treaty would be a ‘dire threat to world peace’ – Gorbachev

Mikhail Gorbachev decries US nuclear stance as ‘a dire threat to peace’ https://www.businesslive.co.za/bd/world/2018-10-28-mikhail-gorbachev-decries-us-nuclear-stance-as-a-dire-threat-to-peace/, Donald Trump withdrawing from a nuclear treaty signed in 1987 moves the former Soviet-era leader to say a nuclear war ‘cannot be ruled out’, 28 OCTOBER 2018 –  ANDREW OSBORN, Moscow — On Friday, Mikhail Gorbachev, the last Soviet leader, denounced a US decision to leave an arms control treaty that helped end the Cold War, saying it heralded a new arms race which increased the risk of nuclear conflict.

US President Donald Trump has said Washington plans to quit the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) treaty, which Gorbachev and Ronald Reagan signed in 1987. The pact eliminated all short- and intermediate-range land-based nuclear and conventional missiles held by both countries in Europe.

Gorbachev, in a column for the New York Times newspaper, said the US move was “a dire threat to peace” that he still hoped might be reversed through negotiations.

“I am being asked whether I feel bitter watching the demise of what I worked so hard to achieve. But this is not a personal matter. Much more is at stake,” he wrote. “A new arms race has been announced.”

Washington has cited Russia’s alleged violation of the treaty as its reason for leaving it, a charge Moscow denies. Russia, in turn. accuses Washington of breaking the pact.

Stationing of US land-based nuclear missiles in western Europe provoked mass protests in the 1980s. Some US allies now fear Washington might deploy a new generation of them in Europe, with Russia doing the same in its exclave of Kaliningrad, once again turning the continent into a potential nuclear battlefield.

If the US made good on its pledge to leave the treaty, Gorbachev said he hoped that US allies would refuse to be what he called launchpads for American missiles that Trump has spoken of developing.

Russian President Vladimir Putin said on Wednesday that Russia would be forced to target any European countries that agreed to host US missiles. Gorbachev, however, said that any disputes about compliance could be solved if there were sufficient political will.

It was clear, however, that Trump’s aim was to release the US from global constraints, he said, accusing Washington of destroying the “system of international treaties and accords” that underpinned peace and security after the Second World War.

“Yet I am convinced that those who hope to benefit from a global free-for-all are deeply mistaken. There will be no winner in a ‘war of all against all’ — particularly if it ends in a nuclear war. And that is a possibility that cannot be ruled out. An unrelenting arms race, international tensions, hostility and universal mistrust will only increase the risk.”

 

October 29, 2018 Posted by | general | Leave a comment

Ikata nuclear reactor goes back online

 https://www3.nhk.or.jp/nhkworld/en/news/20181027_10/

A reactor at the Ikata nuclear power plant in Ehime Prefecture, western Japan, has gone back online after being suspended for about one year.

The No.3 reactor restarted on Saturday. Workers in the central control room removed the control rods that suppress nuclear fission at 30 minutes past midnight.

Shikoku Electric Power Company shut down the reactor last October for regular inspections. It was kept offline by an injunction issued 2 months later by the Hiroshima High Court.

The ruling was revoked last month by another judge at the High Court, paving the way for a restart.

Shikoku Electric says if the process goes smoothly, the Ikata reactor will likely reach criticality — a self-sustaining nuclear reaction — on Saturday night.

It is expected to begin power generation and transmission on Tuesday, and start commercial operations on November 28th.

Ikata Mayor Kiyohiko Takakado in a statement called on Shikoku Electric to continue pursuing safety and reliability at the plant, and provide highly transparent information disclosure.

Members of a civic group opposing the nuclear plant on Saturday staged a demonstration at the site. One participant said she has heard nuclear reactors are needed to ensure stable energy supplies, but she finds it problematic life-threatening radioactive materials are being used to generate power.

October 29, 2018 Posted by | Japan, politics | Leave a comment

Yet another nuclear front group pretending that nuclear is “clean”- Ohio Clean Energy Jobs Alliance

October 29, 2018 Posted by | general | Leave a comment

A Modern Dictator’s Playbook — Mining Awareness +

7 min video link: http://youtu.be/SzrrsU1TslU A Modern Dictator’s Playbook (Extended) By Tom Steyer, who was among those recently targeted by what the FBI is defining as an improvised explosive device (IED). On can but wonder if there is a link between the President of the Philippines, Duterte (discussed in the video), and alleged bomb-maker Cesar […]

via A Modern Dictator’s Playbook — Mining Awareness +

October 28, 2018 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Japan’s government refuses UN call to stop returning evacuees to irradiated areas of Fukushima

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Japan rejects UN call to stop returns to Fukushima

 
Japan’s government lifted its standard for the acceptable level of radiation to 20 millisieverts per year from 1 millisievert after the Fukushima disaster
 
27 Oct 2018
Japan’s government on Friday (Oct 26) rejected calls from a UN rights expert to halt the return of women and children to areas affected by the Fukushima nuclear disaster over radiation fears.
UN special rapporteur Baskut Tuncak on Thursday warned that people felt they were “being forced to return to areas that are unsafe, including those with radiation levels above what the government previously considered safe.”
In the wake of the Fukushima disaster, Japan’s government lifted its standard for the acceptable level of radiation to 20 millisieverts per year from 1 millisievert.
It has been urged to revise that level back down again, but has rejected calls to do so, a decision Tuncak called “deeply troubling.”
“Japan has a duty to prevent and minimise childhood exposure to radiation,” he said.
But Japan’s government rejected the criticism, saying Tuncak’s comments were based on “one-sided information and could fan unnecessary fears about Fukushima,” a foreign ministry official told AFP.
Japan’s government has gradually lifted evacuation orders on large parts of the areas affected by the disaster, which occurred when a massive tsunami sent reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi plant into meltdown in March 2011.
But other areas remain under evacuation orders because of continued high levels of radiation.
Japan’s government has pushed hard to return affected areas to normal, but has faced criticism that what it refers to as “safe” radiation levels are not in line with international standards.
Around 12,000 people who fled their homes for fear of radiation have filed dozens of lawsuits against the government and the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO), the operator of the stricken nuclear plant.
The Fukushima disaster was the worst since Chernobyl in 1986, though there has only been one death linked to it. More than 18,000 people were killed or left missing in the tsunami that prompted the meltdown.

October 27, 2018 Posted by | Fukushima 2018 | , , , | Leave a comment

Stop forcing the return of women and child evacuees to radioactive parts of Fukushima – UN’s call to Japan

Cathy Iwane:
3 Things:
1. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has ALWAYS recommended 1 mSv per year to be ‘safe’ for human living conditions.
2. Japan arbitrarily INCREASED this level 20 TIMES to 20 mSv per year AFTER Fukushima Daiichi blew. Science proves this level DANGEROUS for women & children; thus, the UN calling out this human rights abuse.
3. Japan is funding billions of dollars for 2020 Olympic venues & athletes’ housing in Fukushima; BUT ending support for Fukushima évacuées, forcing many to return to dangerous radiation exposure.
 
 
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Students from Fukushima High School ride a bus and are told by Tokyo Electric Power Co. executive Yoshiyuki Ishizaki, right, about the Fukushima No. 1 Nuclear Power Plant’s No. 1 reactor, which just had a cover removed from its building, in Okuma, Fukushima Prefecture, on Nov. 18, 2016.

Stop sending women & children back to Fukushima fallout zone, UN expert tells Japan

26 Oct, 2018
A UN human rights expert has urged Japan to reconsider its policy of returning women and children to areas still high in radiation after they were displaced by the Fukushima meltdown.
Baskut Tuncak, the UN’s special rapporteur on hazardous substances, criticized the Japanese government’s decision to resettle citizens in areas with radiation levels above one millisievert per year, the threshold of health risk to groups particularly sensitive to radiation, including children and women of childbearing age.
“The gradual lifting of evacuation orders has created enormous strains on people whose lives have already been affected by the worst nuclear disaster of this century,” he said.
Tuncak presented his findings to a General Assembly committee meeting in New York. “Many feel they are being forced to return to areas that are unsafe, including those with radiation levels above what the government previously considered safe,” he added in a news release.
The Japanese government dismissed his concerns, blaming one-sided information and expressing concern that the statement could stoke “unnecessary fears” about the site of the March 2011 nuclear disaster.
After the earthquake and subsequent power plant meltdown, the Japanese government raised its acceptable radiation levels to 20 millisieverts. The UN last year issued a recommendation to return the level to pre-meltdown standards, but Japan ignored the request.
Over seven years later, radiation levels around Fukushima remain high, as has the apparent level of denial within the Japanese government. They recently announced plans to release about a million tons of wastewater contaminated with radioactive elements into the Pacific Ocean, claiming high-tech processing had reduced the contaminants to safe levels, but was forced to admit that 80 percent of the water remained contaminated after local residents protested the dumping plans.
The government has been removing evacuation orders gradually and plans to repeal all of them within five years, regardless of the contamination level in the areas. Japan was slow to enact the evacuation orders initially – only residents within a 3km radius of the meltdown were told to evacuate immediately after the accident, and four days later, residents 30km away were still being told to shelter in place. However, it was already allowing resettlement in areas within 20km of the plant by 2014.
Tuncak has clashed with the Japanese government before. In August, he and two other UN human rights experts criticized them for putting at risk the lives of those involved in the Fukushima clean-up. An earlier UN report showed that 167 plant workers had received radiation doses that increased their cancer risk.
Only last month did the Japanese government admit that even a single plant worker had died as a result of radiation exposure. The unnamed man, whose job included measuring radiation levels immediately after the meltdown, was exposed to about 195 millisieverts of radiation and developed lung cancer after leaving his job in 2015.
 

UN envoy: Halt children’s return to Fukushima

October 26, 2018
A UN envoy has urged Japan to halt the return of children and young women to nuclear accident-hit Fukushima, calling the government’s radiation exposure limit too lax. But the Japanese side is refuting the advice.
Human Rights Council Special Rapporteur Baskut Tuncak on Thursday was speaking to a committee of the UN General Assembly.
The government set the exposure limit at 20 milisieverts per year as a condition for lifting evacuation orders issued for parts of the prefecture after the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident.
Tuncak criticized the government for not taking into account the council’s recommendation that the limit be one milisievert.
A Japanese delegate countered by saying the limit is based on a 2007 recommendation by the International Commission on Radiological Protection.
He also said the government has been consulting Japanese experts on the matter, and that Tuncak’s reports give Fukushima a negative reputation.
But Tuncak said the experts recommend that the annual limit be one milisievert in normal times. He added that risk remains as long as radiation levels exceed this threshold.
Tuncak urged Japan to apply the principle to children and women of reproductive age.

UN rights expert urges Japan to halt returns to Fukushima

October 26, 2018
GENEVA (Kyodo) — The Japanese government must halt the return of women and children displaced by the March 2011 nuclear disaster back to areas of Fukushima where radiation levels remain high, a U.N. human rights expert said Thursday.
The special rapporteur on hazardous substances, Baskut Tuncak, also criticized in his statement the government’s gradual removal of evacuation orders for most of the irradiated areas as well as its plan to lift all orders within the next five years, even for the most contaminated areas.
“The gradual lifting of evacuation orders has created enormous strains on people whose lives have already been affected by the worst nuclear disaster of this century. Many feel they are being forced to return to areas that are unsafe,” he said.
An official of Japan’s permanent mission to the international organizations in Geneva refuted the statement, saying it is based on extremely one-sided information and could fan unnecessary fears about Fukushima.
Tuncak expressed concerns about people returning to areas with radiation above 1 millisievert per year, a level previously observed by Japan as an annual limit so as to prevent risks to the health of vulnerable people, especially children and women of reproductive age.
“It is disappointing to see Japan appear to all but ignore the 2017 recommendation of the U.N. human rights monitoring mechanism to return back to what it considered an acceptable dose of radiation before the nuclear disaster,” he said.
In the wake of the Fukushima nuclear incident, the Japanese government heightened the annually acceptable level of radiation to 20 millisieverts, raising concerns for the health of residents.
In August, Tuncak and two other U.N. human rights experts jointly criticized the Japanese government for allegedly exploiting and putting at risk the lives of “tens of thousands” of people engaged in cleanup operations at and around the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, a claim Tokyo dismissed.

October 27, 2018 Posted by | Fukushima 2018 | , , , | Leave a comment