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The News That Matters about the Nuclear Industry

Breaking! Imports from Tanzania grown with Uranium dust from Uranium mining for Global supermarkets? UK and India affected?

The project was recently visited by Paul Wolfowitz, President of the World Bank, whoviewed the project as an innovative approach that shows that using the country’s traditionalculture is not a barrier to economic progress and supports his point that sustainable economichealth in Africa depends on working with local customs and practices.

The first crop that the pioneer MIMs were asked to grow was baby corn. The market, obtained by Gomba, existed in Europe, and the crop is straightforward to grow, and the smallholders have been growing maize for years. It has proved a suitable trial crop, allowing systems to be ‘bedded down’ before more demanding crops, such as mange tout, sugar snap or podded peas are attempted. A future development can be to seek fair trade registration for the grower groups

Tanzania exports a relatively small volume of vegetables to the UK (Figure 8.1) concentrated on five products, although green beans represent the major export by far, with year on growth since 2003 (Figure 8.2). Tanzania does not export any significant volumes of fruit, although cashews are listed under fruit and nut exports (HTS 0802), with exports predominantly to India.

Thanks to the stable climate of the country, we are able to produce seed throughout the year enabling us to easily obviate seed shortages and to introduce new varieties quickly. In the dynamical vegetable seed market, this is of essential importance.

Cucumber, tomato, sweet pepper and melon. These are the principal crops of which we produce hybrid seed in Tanzania. However, our programme is expanding more and more with numerous other crops.

Uranium dust used as pesticide in Tanzania: urgent need to stop this

Action needed’ on uranium use in Tanzania, DW 11 Nov 12, Reports say Tanzanian farmers have used uranium dust as a pesticide. Immediate inspections are needed, says Ute Koczy, a member of the German parliament and Green Party spokeswoman on development issues.

DW: Tanzanian media have reported that local farmers have used uranium dust to protect their crops. When you found out about this, you wrote an open letter to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) as well as the president and prime minister of Tanzania. What did you call for in the letter?

http://nuclear-news.net/2012/11/12/uranium-dust-used-as-pesticide-in-tanzania-urgent-need-to-stop-this/ for

The production of fresh produce in Africa for
export to the United Kingdom:

October 2006

Tanzania
Tanzania exports a relatively small volume of vegetables to the UK (Figure 8.1) concentrated
on five products, although green beans represent the major export by far, with year on growth
since 2003 (Figure 8.2). Tanzania does not export any significant volumes of fruit, although
cashews are listed under fruit and nut exports (HTS 0802), with exports predominantly to
India.

[...]

The production base has two nuclear estates and currently 2,070 SSGs (pers. comm. Dr Alan
Legge – Gateway to Growth) supplying vegetables to the UK retails and wholesale markets
(Table 8.1). The number of dependents associated with the export sector is over 32,000 and
opportunities for expansion exist. The estimates are based on the number of smallholders and
rural labourers working on the estates and their direct dependents.

[...]

Principal constraint: the infrastructure and technical capacity of farmers in Tanzania, for
export crops to meet the requirements of the EU market is in need of improvement.68
However, the principal constraint in Tanzania is actually a cultural – political one in that
Tanzania is still in the process of change from a socialist to a market oriented economy. At
the same time the socio-economic cultural background is overwhelmingly subsistence
agriculture. These two aspects of the present developmental status of the country promote a
strong focus on smallholder development and a particular reluctance to let go of
preconceptions. This reluctance is evident all the way from the smallholder through the
social and political hierarchy. Developing smallholder market oriented programs has in the
past concentrated on trying to help them to grow better, rather than promoting those
structures which will bring market to them. A successful model needs to be built on
developing demand, not supply.

[...]

The first crop that the pioneer MIMs were asked to grow was baby corn. The market,
obtained by Gomba, existed in Europe, and the crop is straightforward to grow, and the
smallholders have been growing maize for years. It has proved a suitable trial crop, allowing
systems to be ‘bedded down’ before more demanding crops, such as mange tout, sugar snap
or podded peas are attempted. A future development can be to seek fair trade registration for
the grower groups

[...]

There is a diagram showing the supply route to European supermarkets

http://www.dfid.gov.uk/r4d/PDF/Outputs/EcoDev/60506FI_7Mapping_different-value-chains.pdf

EurepGAP is a common standard for farm management practice created in the late 1990s by several European supermarket chains and their major suppliers. GAP is an acronym fo rGood Agricultural Practices.

In September 2007, EurepGAP changed its name to GLOBALGAP. The decision was taken to reflect its expanding international role in establishing Good Agricultural Practices between multiple retailers and their suppliers. A series of the standards can be accessed online [1].

In February 2009 GLOBALGAP launched ‘ChinaGAP’ following successful completion of the benchmarking of ChinaGAP against the GLOBALGAP Good Agricultural Practice reference code.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EurepGAP

Attend the 11th GLOBALG.A.P. SUMMIT in Madrid and be part of a debate that simply couldn’t be more important to all our futures – how to deliver food safely and sustainably now and in years to come.

Exchange experiences and network with top international retailers, brand manufacturers and producers. Listen to thought-provoking speakers. Be better informed and prepared for the difficult decisions ahead.

If the future of global agriculture matters to you, then this is an event you simply cannot afford to miss!

We look forward to seeing you on 6 – 8 November 2012, in Madrid, Spain!

SPONSORS

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Bronze Sponsors Copper Sponsores







http://www.summit2012.org/

Tanzania

Ideal is the location of our production station Tanzania. Thanks to the stable climate of the country, we are able to produce seed throughout the year enabling us to easily obviate seed shortages and to introduce new varieties quickly. In the dynamical vegetable seed market, this is of essential importance.

http://www.enzazaden.co.uk/AboutUs/org/subsidiaries/Tanzania/

Canadian Soil Quality Guidelines for Uranium:
Environmental and Human Health
Scientific Supporting Document

PN 1371
ISBN 978-1-896997-64-3 PDF

Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment 2007

Extract from page 31

[...]

Canadian Soil Quality Guidelines for Uranium:
Environmental and Human Health
Scientific Supporting Document

PN 1371
ISBN 978-1-896997-64-3 PDF

[...]

http://www.ccme.ca/assets/pdf/uranium_ssd_soil_1.2.pdf

Terrestrial Plants
There is some evidence to suggest that hormesis (i.e., stimulation of growth at low
concentrations) may occur in some plants exposed to uranium. In a study that examined effects
of depleted uranium on growth of three grass species, one of the species showed evidence of
hormesis (Meyer et al. 1998b). In a study by Gulati et al. (1980), wheat exposed to uranium
concentrations of 1.5, 3.0, and 6.0 mg/kg showed increased yield compared to controls. This
trend was not observed with tomato, however, where even the lowest concentration, 1.5 mg/kg,
resulted in a 10% reduction in yield (Gulati et al. 1980). Nonetheless, observed growth increases
in certain plants exposed to uranium-rich soils have lead some researchers to suggest that
uranium may be a micronutrient for higher plants (Cannon 1952; Morishima et al. 1976);
however, conclusive proof is lacking. Meyer et al. (1998b) suggest that a potential mechanism
for the hormesis might be enhanced uptake of phosphorus due to interactions of uranium with
phosphate to form complexes (Meyer et al. 1998b)

November 12, 2012 - Posted by | Uncategorized

2 Comments »

  1. [...] Reveals Little Progress, Yet Provides a Way Forwardray ban warrior goldHaavistolta mainio kirjaBreaking! Imports from Tanzania grown with Uranium dust from Uranium mining for Global supermarkets .wp-pagenavi { font-size:12px !important; } [...]

    Pingback by Depleted Uranium | November 13, 2012 | Reply

    • The uranium dust is the result of poor control of the Kayelekera Uranium Mine on the Malawi side. The country has no nuclear legislation and aboveall is not a signatory of the NPT, that is why is causing uranium flying all over Tanzania!

      Comment by David | November 13, 2012 | Reply


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