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Infant deaths linked to Fukushima radiation – report ignored by govt and media

[In April 2011] the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reported increased levels of radiation in the air, water and milk right across the U.S. that were 100s of  times above normal levels. 

while deaths were reported across all age categories, infants under the age of one-year old were the demographic hardest hit. The increase in 2010-2011 deaths among infants in the spring was 1.8 percent, compared to a decrease of 8.37 percent in the preceding 14 weeks.  Infant deaths were highest “because their tissues are rapidly multiplying, they have undeveloped immune systems, and the doses of radioisotopes are proportionally greater than for adults,”

 this study, which was released publicly on December 19, 2011, was not covered by mainstream media, but mostly watchdog groups and alternative, underground and fringe publications. There has been little reported about the after affects of Fukushima of late.

In an audio news conference, Mangano says the reaction of the nuclear industry and government will likely be a smear campaign to the report’s credibility

14,000 U.S. Deaths Linked to Fukushima Nuclear Meltdown: Infants Hardest Hit,The Province,   Tess Zevenbergen January 9, 2012. The first study linking radioactive fallout to 14,000 U.S. deaths as a result of Fukushima’s nuclear meltdown following the 9.0 magnitude earthquake and tsunami that struck the coast of Japan on Friday, March 11th last year has been published in the International Journal of Health Services (IJHS). According to a news release issued over the PR Newswire, the study is the first peer-reviewed study to appear in a medical scientific journal that documents the health hazards associated with the Fukushima nuclear explosion and meltdown catastrophe.

The study, authored by epidemiologist Joseph Mangano MPH MBA and Executive Director of the Radiation and Public Health Project, and Janette Sherman, a toxicologist and adjunct professor at the University of Michigan, states the number of radiation-related deaths linked to the Fukushima disaster is comparable to the number of deaths following the Chernobyl meltdown of 1986. The results of the study were gleaned from looking at U.S. death rates during the period Fukushima occurred, as well as in previous months and years.

“This study of Fukushima health hazards is the first to be published in a scientific journal. It raises concerns, and strongly suggests that health studies continue, to understand the true impact of Fukushima in Japan and around the world. Findings are important to the current debate of whether to build new reactors, and how long to keep aging ones in operation,” stated Mangano.

Radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl disaster, the largest nuclear meltdown the world has ever witnessed, was connected to more than 16,500 related deaths in the 17 weeks immediately following the explosion and fire at the Chernobyl Nuclear power plant in the Ukraine. In comparison, the Fukushima nuclear meltdown is being linked to 14,000 U.S. deaths in the 14 weeks preceding the explosion at the Fukushima nuclear plant.

Just six weeks following the explosion of nuclear reactors at the Fukushima plant, scientists supposedly detected a plume of toxic fallout heading to U.S. shores. The news release also states that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reported increased levels of radiation in the air, water and milk right across the U.S. that were 100s of  times above normal levels. However, on May 3, 2011 less than two months after the Fukushima nuclear explosion and fire, the EPA returned to its regular RadNet monitoring and analysis operations after reporting declining radiation levels. Watchdog groups and critics however criticized the EPA for alleging “rigging” Japanese nuclear radiation equipment which caused them to report lower levels of radioactive fallout.

Part of the evidence the study uses to argues its case of radiation-related U.S. deaths is gleaned from death stats reported by the Center for Disease Control(CDC). The CDC publicly issues weekly reports on numbers of deaths for 122 U.S. cities with a population over 100,000, or about 25-30 percent of the U.S.  population. Fourteen weeks after Fukushima fallout arrived in the U.S. (March 20 to June 25), deaths reported to the CDC rose 4.46 percent from the same period in 2010, compared to just 2.34 percent in the 14 weeks prior. Estimated excess deaths during this period for the entire U.S. are about 14,000. The study further estimates that based on continued research, the U.S. death toll may rise as high as 18,000.

The study claims while deaths were reported across all age categories, infants under the age of one-year old were the demographic hardest hit. The increase in 2010-2011 deaths among infants in the spring was 1.8 percent, compared to a decrease of 8.37 percent in the preceding 14 weeks.  Infant deaths were highest “because their tissues are rapidly multiplying, they have undeveloped immune systems, and the doses of radioisotopes are proportionally greater than for adults,” said Mangano.

What startles me is that this study, which was released publicly on December 19, 2011, was not covered by mainstream media, but mostly watchdog groups and alternative, underground and fringe publications. There has been little reported about the after affects of Fukushima of late.

In an audio news conference, Mangano says the reaction of the nuclear industry and government will likely be a smear campaign to the report’s credibility. ….. To listen to the audio news conference for this study click here. For a complete copy of the study click here.   http://blogs.theprovince.com/2012/01/09/14000-u-s-deaths-linked-to-fukushima-nuclear-meltdown-infants-hardest-hit/

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January 10, 2012 - Posted by | health, Reference, USA

1 Comment »

  1. An article like this needs to be read with caution. Much as it pains me to agree with a pro nuclear writer, I can’t help noticing the logic in this statement from pro nuke Josh Bloom, writing in Forbes:

    “The only two (barely) conceivable ways that such a plume could kill anyone are cancer or radiation poisoning. Cancer can be ruled out immediately, since there is no way it could even begin to develop in such a short period of time, let alone kill anyone. Cancers take years, or even decades, to grow—not weeks. And, almost all of the radioactive material released was iodine-131, associated with thyroid cancer, which is one of the slowest growing and least deadly cancers.

    ..in the 14 weeks following the accident, there were 82 “extra” deaths in New York and 336 in Philadelphia, compared to the same time period in 2010. At the same time, Los Angeles— which is 3000 miles closer to Japan—had 246, while in San Diego there were 137 fewer deaths. And if that doesn’t make sense, consider Houston. Although the city had 484 “extra” deaths during this time, in the 14 weeks prior to the accident there were 1,649 fewer deaths (45%) than in 2010. Must have been a very healthy year there. Or some utterly meaningless data.

    Upon closer examination of the data, things get worse. The authors—used data that is essentially useless. What data was available came from a very small number of samples, and these showed very little radioactivity. For example, they analyzed a grand total of 67 milk samples and found measurable radioisotopes in just 15 of them.
    Likewise, in 153 samples of drinking water, only 36 had any
    radioactivity.”

    Comment by Christina MacPherson | January 12, 2012 | Reply


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